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Author Topic: Warning to Communities about Black/Purple/Dark/Chemicals in Henna!  (Read 7809 times)
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« on: Aug 19, 2008 09:56 AM »


as'ssalamu-alaikum:

Henna hazard: Chemical causes ornate allergies


Harsh dye can swell popular tattoos into itchy, blistery swirls and shapes


URL: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26080350/

The American Academy of Dermatology recently issued a warning that a chemical found in black henna tattoos can cause a severe allergic reaction, causing the skin to redden, swell and blister — but only where the henna is applied, leaving people with bubbly blisters in shapes like suns, stars and flowers.


As henna body art has become mainstream in the last few years, often peddled at summer carnivals and concerts, dermatologists report increasingly treating patients, especially teen girls and young women, with these often elaborate looking allergic reactions.


“Just because they’re temporary, people think they’re safe,” says Dr. Sharon E. Jacob, a dermatologist at the University of California, San Diego.


Natural henna vs. black henna


While true henna is made from harmless plants, black henna uses a chemical called para-phenylenediami ne, or PPD, which makes the tattoo dry quickly and last longer — and in some cases, that’s much, much longer.


“These skin allergies themselves are not dangerous,” says Dr. Colby Evans, a dermatologist in private practice in Austin, Texas. “But they can cause scarring or darkness to the skin that can be permanent."


Despite the potential for creating a permanent souvenir from that trip to Mexico, the scarring generally will go away on its own within a few weeks. But it's almost always odd-looking. This week, the New England Journal of Medicine published Evans’ account of a particularly intense case: A 19-year-old Kuwaiti woman Evans treated after she returned from a wedding, where she had black henna applied to her forearms, hands and fingers. A week later, her swirly, flowery henna was overwritten with a swirly, flowery blister.

Last year, Evans also treated a young man with a similar allergic reaction to henna that took an even more bizarre form: a blister on the back of his neck in the perfect shape of an eagle.


In both cases, Evans prescribed steroid creams to bring the swelling down.


Lifelong allergies to some medications


But Evans and other dermatologists warn that just one bad reaction to black henna can be enough to cause permanent sensitivity to PPD, and that allergy can cross-react with chemical relatives in certain anesthetics and medications for heart disease, hypertension and diabetes.


“The allergy you can develop is lifelong,” says Jacob. But she’s found that people, especially teens, are generally unimpressed by her warnings of reactions to medication, so she reserves this for the kicker: “It may mean you can never dye your hair again.”

While PPD is used in most hair dyes, allergic reactions aren’t very common because it isn't applied directly to the skin, and in black henna the concentration of PPD is 10 times higher, Jacob estimates. But a PPD sensitivity could cause an allergic reaction after even the slightest contact with the chemical.


Kim Geiger's blister faded away within a month, and her mom says she hasn't had any allergic reaction to medication since. But Debbe Geiger often wonders how anyone could ever tell the difference between safe, natural henna and black henna.


“This was a little booth set up at the hotel pool, and I didn’t think anything of it,” she says.


Experts say there are a few easy ways to tell the difference between true henna and black henna. For one, henna is never black — it’s red, which darkens to a brownish color on the skin as it dries. Real henna starts to fade away within a few days, so be wary of a henna tattoo artist who boasts of tattoos that will last any longer than that.


But both mom and daughter Geiger aren’t taking any more chances; they’re staying far away from all things henna. “It looks so harmless," Debbe Geiger says, "but you have to watch these ingredients they’re using.”
© 2008 MSNBC Interactive
 
URL: http://www.msnbc. msn.com/id/ 26080350/
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« Reply #1 on: Aug 19, 2008 10:48 AM »

salam

A colleagues little grand daughter, had a really bad reaction to black henna, colleague was really surprised that the black henna wasnt all natural.

It's because we're accustomed to henna being all natural from a plant that people dont realise the black henna stuff is loaded with chemicals.


Wassalaam

And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186
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« Reply #2 on: Aug 25, 2010 09:05 PM »

wsalam,

I'm bumping this here. This weekend there was a ramadan festival here at the mosque and a girl was doing henna that seemed natural but burned some of the girls Sad Apparently "It smells real and the color is very nice, but comes out almost like a gel and when it dries a layer comes off like flaking plastic covering but some of it doesn't come off and is bonded with the skin, then when that comes off it takes the skin with it!" The color seems purple not even black so no one realized!! Be warned people it can cause permanent scarring and worse!! Only use natural henna and henna you know exactly what's in it and where it came from.


How can you tell if it's real/natural henna??

 *If you or someone you know is considering a henna tattoo, there are ways to check if the dye used is pure henna. The powder used to make the henna  paste, as well as the paste itself, should be green. If it is a very dark brown or black, and/or has a chemical smell, it may be Black Henna. If you witness someone getting a temporary tattoo that stains quickly, and is a dark black versus the reddish brown stain of pure henna, it is likely Black Henna.
   * Ask the artist questions! Did they make their own paste? If so, what's in the henna paste? There should be 4 main ingredients: henna powder (made from the leaves of the henna plant); an acidic liquid (eg. lemon juice, tea, coffee); sugar (this is the glue that keeps henna on your skin); and essential oil (look for safe EOs eg. Tea Tree, Lavender, Cajeput, Ravensara and/or Eucalyptus... Mehndi oil is unregulated and can contain strong Clove oil, ammonia and even kerosene!) If the artist can't answer your questions, don't let them henna you.
    * Look for ICNHA certified henna artists: International Certification for Natural Henna Arts. A rigorous test and practical exam is required to get this certification. This ensures that you are dealing with an educated artist who only uses natural henna. Ask to see their certificate of achievement.
    * Cross-examine by using the list below:



Real henna :

    * is made from dried, ground-up henna plant leaves... not the roots, bark, twigs or other parts of the plant. Only the leaves contain the dye.
    * smells like fresh soil/hay/spinach. It may also smell of the other ingredients: tea/coffee/lemon juice and essential oils (eg. lavender, eucalyptus)
    * will only stain skin in oranges, browns, reds and burgundies, in light to dark shades. It does not produce jet black stains or other colours (e.g. blue).
    * stains your skin for 1-4 weeks. The longer the paste is left on your skin, the darker the stain will be.
    * paste is like mud, sitting on top of your skin. It will flake off as it dries, and just needs to be picked off, not washed off.
    * will leave an orange stain on your skin, after the paste is flaked off.
    * takes 24-48 hours to completely darken (oxidize).
    * benefits your skin; it doesn't hurt it. Henna has been used for centuries as an antiseptic, astringent, antibacterial, antifungal, antispasmodic (relaxing), antipyretic (cooling), topical sunscreen, antiperspirant, a treatment for sunburn & eczema, in the prevention & masking of foot odour, as a skin moisturizer & conditioner, and as a treatment for alopecia (hair loss).
    * will feel very cool on your skin. (Fortunately, heat will help extract the dye from the paste, so you can cover up if you feel too cold.)
    * will not leave blisters, open sores or scars on your skin... No matter where location it is applied!


More info and scary pictures: http://www.hennabyholly.com/blackhenna.html
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« Reply #3 on: Aug 25, 2010 09:14 PM »

WARNING: DO NOT EVER USE BLACK HENNA!

It is not the real plant-based henna which when painted on leaves a brown or reddish colour on your skin.

The black henna looks pretty but it is likely to contain POISONOUS dyes and chemicals and can cause SEVERE ALLERGIC REACTIONS in as many as one in ten ( not always on the first application which may only sensitize you to it, so if you have ever got one of these black henna patterns done without incident, please don't get it done again.)

Remember when I said the two dollars admission fee to the Mnarani Natural Aquarium was the best two dollars I ever spent? Well, this was the WORST three dollars I ever spent.



I got this done in front of my beach hotel in Nungwi, Zanzibar by a very nice local woman. She painted a very beautiful design. Unfortunately, this whole experience was a nightmare afterwards.

The design felt okay at first, but I had second thoughts about having done this almost right away, and tried to peel the henna paste off only ten minutes later (they recommend you leave it on for an hour). I ran up to the bathroom in our room and tried to wash it off, but as was common in our hotel the water was not currently working.

Fortunately they got the pump going withing the hour and I took off what I could. It still felt okay, but that inner little voice of mine was already telling me that this had been a bad, bad, idea. I tried to hush it. After all, I've had henna applied many, many times in my life and never had a problem: at bellydance parties in Canada, in the city of Marrakech in Morrocco. But that was real henna, not the black henna.

It was during the night (when my arm began to itch and burn) that I began to realize I was having an allergic reaction and by the time I was on the flight from Nairobi to England I was nauseous and the blisters were at least an inch high. I wouldn't have thought it possible for your skin to contain so much fluid...



Flashforward: This Black Henna resulted in visiting two hospitals over the next several days after I arrived back in London, England. I received a severe second-degree chemical burn which resulted in huge painful blisters and blackened tissue. My arm weeped pus for several weeks and had to be swaddled in a rubberized second-skin and bandages. I took antibiotics for the blood poisoning that occurred.

A year and a half later I consider myself very fortunate to not have a disfiguring scar. But I still have faint outlines on my arm where the black henna was painted on even now.

Yeah, don't do what I did on vacation, folks.
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« Reply #4 on: Aug 25, 2010 09:19 PM »



A horrified mother today warned of the dangers of temporary henna tattoos after her four-year-old son was left with a permanent flower-shaped scar.

Charlie Latimer suffered horrific burns to his arm after he was given the floral design on holiday in Portugal.

Charlie begged his parents to let him have the tattoo after they walked past a street artist on the Algarve.

But within days of having the design, his upper arm began to bleed and blister after his body reacted to the dye.

Charlie was rushed to hospital and placed on a course of antibiotics following the family's return to the UK on August 29.

He now has a two-inch scar of a flower on his bicep, which doctors say could remain there for the rest of his life.

Mother Katie Latimer, 37, said she had 'terrible guilt' after allowing her son to have the temporary tattoo.

Mrs Latimer, a writer from Bath, Somerset, said: 'He will be scarred for the rest of his life. My son's beautiful, smooth four-year-old skin is now all blistery and scarred.

'He will have to live with this now for the rest of his life, although we are keeping our fingers crossed that it could one day disappear.

'Charlie has been told he can never have a tattoo or dye his hair for the rest of his life due to the seriousness of his reaction.'
Charlie Latimer whose armed was burned after having a henna tattoo

The incident took place when Charlie and his seven-year-old sister Olivia were taken on the Latimer's annual 10-day holiday to Lagos.

The family flew out on August 19, but disaster struck when Charlie sat for the 15-minute henna tattoo of a red flower on August 27.

Henna, a natural plant extract, fades within 10 days and is usually completely harmless.

But some unscrupulous artists mix henna with a cheap hair dye paraphenylenediamine, or PPD, which can burn the skin.

Charlie's skin began peeling within days of their return to the UK and he was given a course of antibiotics.

When his condition failed to improve, his mother and father John, 34, rushed him to Bath's Royal United Hospital where he was kept in overnight.
beach at Lagos near Portugal

Disaster: Charlie's skin began bleeding and blistering after he had the 15-minute tattoo from a street artist while on holiday in Lagos, Portugal

Dr Chris Lovell, a consultant dermatologist at the hospital, said parents should be aware of the dangers henna poses.

He said: 'Under European rules, it is illegal to use PPD in henna tattoos and most professional salons use pure henna, which rarely causes allergies.

'But these rules are not always enforced and people getting their tattoos on beaches and in some developing countries, where the controls are less strict, are at greater risk.

'I would strongly recommend that travel agents and companies warn their customers about the potential hazard and parents make themselves aware of the potential risks of henna tattoos.'

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1212530/Holiday-henna-horror-boy-4-scarred-life-flower-tattoo.html#ixzz0xeQ5DLBT
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« Reply #5 on: Aug 25, 2010 09:40 PM »

Sick...

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