Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Turks use diet patch to ease Ramadan fasting  (Read 3808 times)
Halima
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reps: 397
Posts: 1714



« on: Aug 25, 2008 08:17 PM »

Turks use diet patch to ease Ramadan fasting
8/22/08

ANKARA (AFP) - Turkish Muslims plan to resort to appetite suppressing diet patches to help them get through the daily fast during the Ramadan holy month, Anatolia news agency reported on Friday.

One of the most popular questions asked on a helpline run by Turkey's religious affairs directorate is "whether diet patches are suitable for fasting" and "whether the use of diet patches will amount to foul play," the report said.

Theologists have reassured them they have nothing to worry about.

"Fasting is a way of disciplining the body. Those who use diet patches try to achieve the same. That's why diet patches are not objectionable," said Mehmet Baris, the muftu, or highest Muslim authority, in the southern province of Adana.

The patches, which release appetite-supressing ingredients to the body through the skin, cannot be considered as corrupting the fast because their effect amounts to "showering or applying a pomade on the skin" rather than eating, theology professor Kerim Yavuz said.

During Ramadan, which starts on September 1, observant Muslims eat a light pre-dawn meal and fast until sunset, a practice aimed at fostering self-discipline, sacrifice and empathy for the poor.
Logged

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira

Faizah
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reps: 31
Posts: 365



« Reply #1 on: Aug 25, 2008 08:30 PM »

Now why didn't I think of that.  A diet patch to deal with the hunger pangs and a B-12 patch to keep my energy level up.

Fa'izah
Logged

Halima
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reps: 397
Posts: 1714



« Reply #2 on: Aug 25, 2008 08:46 PM »

Ramadan Diet Patches Stir Controversy
8/24/08

IslamOnline.net & Newspapers

CAIRO — The use of appetite suppressing diet patches to help Muslims get through the daily fast during the holy month of Ramadan are leaving Saudi and Turkish scholars at odds.

Sheikh AbdulWahhab Bin Nassir Al-Tirairi said the diet patch will be banned if it supplies the body with nutrition.

"It (fasting) strengthens human will and trains a Muslim to rise to the challenges of life," said Tirairi, a former professor at Riyadh-based Al-Imam Mohammed Bin Saud Islamic University.

"It also gives us the ability to control our desires and it gives us a chance to test our patience."

The Saudi scholar said the patches should be medically tested to see if they can be considered nutritious.

Anatolia news agency reported Friday that Turkish Muslims are planning to resort to diet patches to help them get through the daily fast during Ramadan.

According to the Diet-patch.com, Band-Aid-like patches stick to the skin and its weight loss ingredients seep into the body system via the skin.

The patches help control appetite, stimulate metabolism, nourish the muscular system, eliminate toxins, reduce water retention and reduce fatigue.

"When a Muslim fasts, she/he will experience how poor people normally feel," said Tirairi.

"This will surely push a Muslim to help the poor."

Ramadan, the ninth month on the Islamic lunar calendar, will fall this year in early September.

In Ramadan, adult Muslims, save the sick and those traveling, abstain from food, drink, smoking and sex between dawn and sunset.

No Objection

But Turkish scholars said the diet patches were permissible in the holy fasting month.

"(The patches' effect amounts to) showering or applying a pomade on the skin (rather than eating)," theology professor Kerim Yavuz told Anatolia news agency.

According to Anatolia, one of the most popular questions asked on a helpline run by Turkey's religious affairs directorate is "whether diet patches are suitable for fasting" and "whether the use of diet patches will amount to foul play."

Mufti Mehmet Baris, Turkey's highest Muslim authority, said there was nothing to worry about the use of diet patches.

"Fasting is a way of disciplining the body," he said.

"Those who use diet patches try to achieve the same. That's why diet patches are not objectionable."
Logged

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira

Fozia
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reps: 1244
Posts: 2658



« Reply #3 on: Aug 25, 2008 11:24 PM »

salam

Interesting that its allowed, showering and applying whatsits to the body is not absorbed into the blood stream tho is it?


Wassalaam
Logged

And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186

Abdurahman
Bro
Sr. Member
*

Reps: 44
Posts: 390


Oh Allah, Guide us to the Straight Path.


« Reply #4 on: Aug 26, 2008 03:53 PM »

Asalamualaikum wrt wb,


All praise be to Allah.


According to thedietchannel.com, these patches contain: "Fucus vesiculosus, a brown algae found in oceans and seas. It contains iodine, which manufacturers claim stimulate the thyroid gland to speed up metabolism. Other diet patches feature ingredients such as guarana, 5-HTP, zinc pyruvate, DHEA, yerba mate, lecithin, flaxseed oil, L-Carnitine, and zinc citrate."


It also states the algea are "high in protein."


Thus, since these patches contain various nutrients such as iodine, proteins, lecithin, oils, vitamins, etc. they are haram, according to the Shariah, since they provide nutrition to the body and this is akin to eating.  Even if a patch or injection does not contain these ingredients, it is still not permissible to bypass the hunger and thirst of fasting, just as the Children of Israeel bypassed the Sabath by setting their nets on Friday and taking the fish on Sunday.


Alhamdulillah, if a Muslim finds it unbearable to contain his thirst or hunger do to illness, travel, old age, weakness, or other valid medical excuse, they can always make up the day later when it is easier for them.  Unfortunately, due to the lack of Imaan in our Ummah, people resort to conveniences such as taking patches to bypass the hunger of fasting.


May Allah guide our Muslim brothers and sisters to follow the Sunnah, and let us reach Ramadan, and earn forgiveness through our good acts during this blessed month.


And Allah knows best.
Logged

Be merciful to those on earth, and the One in the Heavens will be merciful to you.

Halima
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reps: 397
Posts: 1714



« Reply #5 on: Aug 26, 2008 05:06 PM »

My personal take on this is: why not fast Ramadan the way Allah (SWT) prescribed in the Qur'an through Rasulullah (SAW)?

Why look for short cuts, especially when you are fit and able?

Allah, the merciful (SWT) has already given reprieve during Ramadan to children, the elderly, the sick, the travelers, women during their menses and in during pregnancy if not able, for those breastfeeding, etc.

Logged

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira

Fozia
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reps: 1244
Posts: 2658



« Reply #6 on: Aug 26, 2008 05:40 PM »

salam

You kow, fasting isn't actually so difficult when one comes down to it.

Yes the first day of fasting is probably the most taxing one, as ones body is effectively going thro a very intensive detox. I can practically guarantee I will be down with a migrane by Iftar on day one. However it gets easier, and by the end ones body tends to have adapted.

I dont understand people wanting to take shortcuts, when there are those in the world who have no food to eat and will not be looking forward to a banquet after sunset.

Instead of patches, I really do think people should donate the money to charity and pray to Allah to ease their 'suffering' and the ummahs in general, if they feel its that bad. There's nothing like empathy to increase the love for between our hearts for our brother and sisters who truly are suffering from hunger pangs with no ease in sight.

Besides which if it were harmful, fasting would not be a pillar of Islam.


Some people dont know they're born, really they dont.


Wassalaam

Logged

And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186

Faizah
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reps: 31
Posts: 365



« Reply #7 on: Aug 26, 2008 09:16 PM »

As salaamu alaikum

I'm not so sure it's necessarily that people are looking for a shortcut so much as a means to continue about their daily routine with minimal interruption that can be prevented.  I can only speak for myself but no matter if it is the first day or the last day somewhere around 2P my energy disappears.  On the weekends it's fine because I can just take a nap; however during the workweek I don't have that option because I have to be at work to earn a living to take care of myself and my children since there is no one else available to take on that responsibility.

To the point of "there are those in the world who have no food to eat and will not be looking forward to a banquet after sunset"- should any of us be gorging ourselves with a daily banquet?  One of the points of fasting is to gain a deeper understanding of the conditions that others face on a daily basis; so going without food/drink during daylight hours only to overindulge and "make up" for it after sunset defeats the purpose.  Further as was mentioned in something I read a few years ago; if the expectation is to enjoy a large meal at the end of the day who is supposed to cook it during the day and doesn't that take that person away from another purpose of Ramadan - a spiritual renewal by spending more time devoted to faith?

Fa'izah
Logged

jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reps: 2770
Posts: 7130


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #8 on: Aug 27, 2008 12:05 AM »

wsalam,

how come no one told us dieting people about this diet patch!!! maan... i coulda sure used this!! as for fasting...i think people should fast. seriously we need to feel the hunger and the pain and not make it easy for ourselves. if a person cannot fast though and it's too difficult for them they are excused islamically so i don't see what the issue is.
Logged

LeylaNur
Sis
Jr. Member
*

Reps: 1
Posts: 91


Remembrance of Allah is the true source of peace..


« Reply #9 on: Aug 27, 2008 04:03 AM »

I actually agree with Faizah. While in an ideal world or a Muslim country where many are fasting and it is common, and also workdays are usually made earlier and people go home earlier, I believe fasting is easier.

In Western societies such as the U.S. where employers are not used to fasting people and those at work may be on the road and at work from 6:30am-6:30pm or later, they are around people microwaving and bringing in hot, scented food, or with air blowing on them to dehydrate them.. Not to mention besides all that, bosses NOT being agreeable to the issues that fasting people may have such as:

- not so fresh breath
- employees not being so mentally focused when they start getting hungry. People really DO need brain food. (I've had my bosses whine at me for me being "off", fasting was NOT an acceptable excuse for them, especially when they heard I'd be like that all month)

Add all this to the Muslim usually being an outsider in the workplace (especially hijab wearing women), and Ramadan fasting can be a recipe for disaster. It's not that you are physically unable and you will suffer and die so much as even a small lapse in performance can interfere with your livelihood and perhaps even jeopordize your job.

For some people a patch or appetite suppressant could be a real savior regarding their jobs. This is even more important for doctors, lawyers and high-responsibility individuals who really cannot afford to be "off" at all or someone could be dead. (surgeons)
Logged

I try to remember to count my blessings each day because I have many:

To be thankful for my health, and that of my loved ones, the presence of my husband and the continuation of our marriage, that we can pay our bills and have food on the table..

So many blessings but often, so little thanks!

AbdulBasir
Bro
Jr. Member
*

Reps: 85
Posts: 81


« Reply #10 on: Aug 27, 2008 06:44 AM »

salam

This is nuts, what's next? People performing tawaf in Segways? Have we as Muslims become so weak that we can't handle a little abstinence for a few hours without taking drugs? Before saying anything else, as already stated above, I think it's important to mention that the legality of an appetite suppression patch for a fasting person is debatable, because the ingredients (e.g amino acids) could, by some definitions, be considered a form of nutrition. It's not like a lot of them are a just a single drug, they are combinations, plus the issue of medical necessity (or lack thereof) would also come into play for such a concession.

But putting that issue aside, even if it were deemed acceptable by our scholars in the letter of the sacred Law, is it really in the spirit of the Law?

It's sad how soft we are; the people before us worked as hard or harder than us, and with less resources at their disposal, and they did just fine. Historically Muslims have been more creative, insightful, and intellectually productive during Ramadan. In physically demanding work, schedules were adapted or people continued to do what they were doing and just struggled through it. Hakeem Olajuwon was a professional basketball player and struggled; he would be the first to say that it wasn't easy, but he would also say that he played better during Ramadan. I still remember one year Ramadan was the entire month of February, and he was named player of the month that month because his play went to even higher levels!

Perhaps if we prepared and adapted better for Ramadan it wouldn't seem so difficult. There are so many built-in measures in the sunnah of fasting that will make so much things easier, like voluntary fasting outside of Ramadan, in Sha'ban or even Mon/Thurs, ayaam-al-beed for acclimatization, eating a proper suhoor for proper nutrition and energy levels, the use of the miswak for hygiene etc etc.  And for those that cannot fast, the Shar'iah is broad and clear in dealing with those special situations.

But for the rest of us who have no medical excuse and feel a little pang of hunger and use that as an excuse for our lack of productivity or a lapse or loss of focus? That is a bogus excuse; honestly in a high-pressure, high-responsibility profession there are *no* excuses, so no point making an excuse like that anyways. I know plenty of Muslims in professions that would be deemed high-responsibility or mentally intensive, professions where lives and livelihoods are on the line, literally, and they fast and do just fine, walhamdulillah. A lot of that has to do also in how we perform our work outside of Ramadan; if we perform it with ihsaan and itqaan (perfection) as we are encouraged to do, we should be just as proficient, if not more so, during Ramadan, like Br. Hakeem.

Unfortunately we've become so soft that we tend to be people of excuses rather than people of action, and this is just a manifestation of that. We really need to just toughen up. I do agree that fasting is more difficult in a non-Muslim environment, but let's deal with it and do even better. Like many of you I've worked in environments where some non-Muslims are incredibly supportive during Ramadan while others are just rooting for you to fail and mess up. You know, the type that show no respect, who think they can taunt you with food in you face and what not. I personally get stoked with stuff like that and say bring it on; that just makes the challenge and the equivalent reward (if Allah accepts) greater, provided the intention is pure and for the sake of Allah. Use that as motivation and do even better in the job, so that you put all those people with spiritual cow-bells around their neck who graze all day at the vending machines and coffee shops to shame. Let them see what a Musim can do, even with a wordly handicap, and perhaps they'll start to take notice of the Divine assistance the true saa'imoon are blessed with .

Before Umrah once, the Sahaba were considered down and out when they were experiencing fever, and the Quraysh were pleased at their weakness. So the Prophet SAS ordered them to uncover their shoulders in tawaf and jog in the early circuits to show their strength. The Quraysh were astonished  Shocked and were basically like whoa we better not mess with these people!

We're an ummah of toughness and strength because we rely on the source of all strength, Allah, and follow the example of the strongest of men, in all respects, Rasuallah SAS. That's the reason we do the same thing in tawaf tho this very day. Let us uncover our shoulders, strip off that appetite suppression patch and all other unessentials that weigh and slow us down on our journey towards Allah, and get a move on.

Apologies if I came on too strong (no pun intended) or harsh. This topic just really got me going; I can't remember the last time I wrote a post this long. I'm even more pumped for Ramadan now Wink. Have a blessed Ramadan everyone!

salam


Logged

Fozia
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reps: 1244
Posts: 2658



« Reply #11 on: Aug 27, 2008 11:38 AM »

salam

I completely disagree with any percieved shortcuts in fasting.

Firstly the diet patches from my take will supress appetite, not alleviate tiredness which in my experience comes from waking for suhoor, my days are generally 18hours long in Ramadan, I also work full time, I have to. But you know what, so what?

Fasting and experiencing the discomforts of fasting for a few days does help us see a little of what those living in abject poverty are going thro, theres no better spur to give to charity than to experience the actual hardship yourself firsthand.

Fasting makes one appreciate that which we do have. And when I said banquets it was meant as a figure of speech. Altho, ex used to insist on something like a ten course iftar..... which I will not have to do any longer Alhumdulillah.

But above all, fasting is about submitting to the will of our creator, we are surrounded by food and yet we abstain from eating and engaging in other worldly pleasures for a small duration of time because our creator has asked us of it.
I love it because I am doing as Allah has decreed, very seriously, Ramadan is my acting out my declaration to Allah that I hear and I completely obey. It's not a hardship at all when considering it in those contexts.

I have a handfull of work colleagues ho would love to hear me complain about fasting, but it's not a hardship, it is not a horrible barbaric practice. It helps my body detox, and I feel my body improves from the rest given it for a month in every twelve to recover from the relentless digesting of all the rubbish I ingest usually.

I always loved Ramadan as a child, I always ached to fast like the grown ups. Now I can I'm not going to wish it away. I figure every little discomfort I experience I can present to Allah. If I'm ever asked what did you do for me? I'll say, I spent one month in every twelve submitting to your will completely, despite the discomfort to me.

I hope all our brothers and sisters on this board and beyond have a wonderful and beneficial Ramadan.



Wassalaam
Logged

And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186

blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reps: 31
Posts: 1649



« Reply #12 on: Aug 27, 2008 02:46 PM »

Asalamualaikum

I agree with brother Abdul Basir and sister Fozia. may Allah swt reward those who deal with the hardship and make the difficult easy. may Allah swt ease the suffering around the world and make it eazy on the people who dont have a choice but to fast not only in Ramadan but every day. May Allah swt help us become tough Muslims and fear none but Him.
Logged

tq
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reps: 189
Posts: 381


« Reply #13 on: Aug 27, 2008 02:53 PM »

Assalamo elikuim
I agree 100% with Br.AbdulBasir - Jazak Allah khair for the post.
Sure its going to be tough smelling coffee at work but its not going to kill us, Inshallah Smiley Fasting is about getting tough, feeling the hunger and controlling our nafs - Sahabas fought wars during fasting .
Sr.Fozia we also look forward to ramadan, as they say its time to recharge Smiley
Wasalam
tq
Logged

Hayfa
Sis
Newbie
*

Reps: 1
Posts: 19


« Reply #14 on: Aug 27, 2008 06:42 PM »

Asalam Alaikum,

It is interesting that this is for Muslims in "Muslim" countries, where having a shorter work day etc. is fairly common and accepted to work a "lighter" load.

I have always been impressed with people who do physically, highly demanding jobs and fast' like people on road crews or consrtuction. I also wonder about people who have jobs like surgeons, those that do those intensive, long operations.. maybe they make it up, donate to to feed people etc.. Guess its good most surgeries are in the mornings.. but some like transplants, emergency room personel etc have as much control.

 
Logged

LeylaNur
Sis
Jr. Member
*

Reps: 1
Posts: 91


Remembrance of Allah is the true source of peace..


« Reply #15 on: Aug 27, 2008 07:36 PM »

I MAY be wrong, but I think that Turkey, even though it is predominantly Muslim is actually a SECULAR country. Again, maybe I'm wrong, but I don't think they get special compensation (shorter workdays) for Ramazan. I THINK they are in the 9-5(ish) boat with the rest of us Westerners.
Logged

I try to remember to count my blessings each day because I have many:

To be thankful for my health, and that of my loved ones, the presence of my husband and the continuation of our marriage, that we can pay our bills and have food on the table..

So many blessings but often, so little thanks!

Halima
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reps: 397
Posts: 1714



« Reply #16 on: Aug 28, 2008 07:51 PM »

I am a single (divorced) Mom and I have always worked.  I live in a country where Muslims are only 15% of the population.  At work, we do not get any special treatment because we are fasting.  We report at work in the morning (08:00 a.m.) like everybody else and leave at COB (16:30 p.m.) like everybody else.  I have always been the only bread winner yet Ramadan never fazed me.  Today, I was fasting my own fast (Thursday) and work was heavy, I had to ran out of the office during lunch hour to do an important errand and was back to continue from where I left.  Still I was able to fast without any problems, ALHAMDU LILLAH.

The colleague I share the office with is a Christian.  When I am praying my Dhur (Zuhur) prayer, she always vacates the office for me or keeps quiet till I finish my Salah.  She was courteous to ask me if I will be offended if she ate in front of me during Ramadan.  I said: 'Not at all!'  I told her that for me, fasting is a religious obligation that I have to full fill hence I condition my mind and heart to fast for the sake of Allah.  No outward temptation will distract me.  Then she said that out of courtesy and respect for my faith, she will ensure that she does not eat in front of me, anyway.

Some of parts of Kenya are very hot.  From 30, 35 to 40 degrees celcius  during the day.  Yet Muslims living in these parts of the country fast religiously without resorting to any short cuts or complaints.  They go to work too.

As for a banquet after sunset, don't Muslims share iftar with the less fortunate?  Masjids here offer iftar to Muslims who do not have a place to break their fast.  Even Muslim inmates are given food donations during Ramadan.  It is part of the charity of feeding the less fortunate.  So, it covers one aspect of devotion.

A diet patch to relieve fatigue/hunger pains is a true short cut.

May ALLAH SWT help us keep our faith intact, Ameen.  May we fast as prescribed while we are able, Ameen. 

Halima
Logged

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira

BrKhalid
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reps: 273
Posts: 1352



« Reply #17 on: Aug 31, 2008 07:45 AM »

Asalaamu Aliakum  bro

There is no doubt that fasting in the West brings about additional challenges especially with the long summer months approaching.


What I find sad, however, are those in the Middle East who stay up all night smoking shisha and what not and with the full knowledge that they can lie in after Fajr because of the reduced working hours!!  Undecided


InshaAllah let's all get pumped up and make this Ramadhan as benefical as we can!!
Logged

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]

jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reps: 2770
Posts: 7130


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #18 on: Aug 31, 2008 08:18 AM »

ws,

The interesting thing we're assuming in this discussion is that fasting is harder in "Western" countries. Why do we say that? There are still many, many people who live in third world Muslim countries-- India, Indonesia, Afghanistan, Sudan, Nigeria,  wherever --where their fasting is surely way harder than our 9to5 AC office work so I don't get it? Should we all just start taking various things to "get around" truly "fasting".

Weird thing I read just last night about how the Jews were legislated not to fish on the day of the sabbath Sat. and that was the day the fish always came to the top and was plentiful so a few of them came up with this idea of leaving a net out there on Friday night and then on Sunday morning pulling it up with all the fish, and they were condemned by God for that. Why? Cuz they were just trying to get around the rule of the Creator. And this rule was there perhaps as a test, or for a wisdom or something else, yet they tried to get around it.


Quote
InshaAllah let's all get pumped up and make this Ramadhan as benefical as we can!!

yayyy I'm more excited now that it's almost here!! another interesting thing I heard today... in many things in nature we see some things before it that indicate a great event to come, like before a sunrise we see rays and a lightened sky and colors and then the sun rises. just like that we should take the time to mentally and physically prepare ourselves for the sunrise of Ramadan.

ws
Logged

Halima
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reps: 397
Posts: 1714



« Reply #19 on: Sep 02, 2008 06:43 AM »

There is no doubt that fasting in the West brings about additional challenges especially with the long summer months approaching.

That is exactly the point!  How come there are no complaints when Ramadan coincides with the winter months when the days are extremely shorter?  For Muslims who are not in the west, Ramadan days are a full day every year! Yet people welcome the Holy Month with full cheer and pleasure.

Quote
InshaAllah let's all get pumped up and make this Ramadhan as benefical as we can!!

Ameen, Ameen, Ameen!
Logged

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: