Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Introducing Ramadan to neighbors?  (Read 2184 times)
Anonymous
Bro
Sr. Member
*

Reps: 224
Posts: 355


ANONYMOUS Post


« on: Sep 04, 2008 10:17 AM »

Do you do anything to introduce Ramadan or actually Islam to your neighbours at this time? I am trying to be thoughtful to them but I worry they will think it preaching?
Logged

This post submitted using the ANONYMOUS button on the main Madina menu. Please reply here publicly so that the original poster can read any replies.

Fozia
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reps: 1247
Posts: 2661



« Reply #1 on: Sep 04, 2008 11:13 AM »

salam

I take a plate of food round at Irftar time, tell them its the ramadan and we share our food when we break fast.

I make more friends this way.



Wassalaam
Logged

And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186

jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reps: 2781
Posts: 7137


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #2 on: Sep 06, 2008 05:34 AM »

ws,

I knew one palestinian sister in school who would have these chocolates and would have a nice ramadan message printed up and put inside with them.

You can even order or make things like these "Peace cookies" to give to your neighbors.





I didn't really do anything for ramadan but after it was over for eid I would bring in baklava or cake or something for my co-workers and they seemed to really appreciate that Wink

Logged

blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reps: 31
Posts: 1649



« Reply #3 on: Sep 06, 2008 05:29 PM »

salaam

Fozia thats a really good idea! 

Jannah yah thas what I would do...
Logged

jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reps: 2781
Posts: 7137


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #4 on: Sep 15, 2008 10:35 AM »

Found this nice related article:

8 tips on sharing Ramadan with your neighbors

Ramadan is a great opportunity to share Islam its values of spirituality, generosity and kindness with others, especially your neighbors. It's a great time to do Dawa and explain our faith as well as our Muslim culture. And Dawa and intercultural understanding are very much needed in the current atmosphere of anger, tension and sadness in the wake of September 11, 2001.

Here are some ideas on how you can share the joy with your neighbors this Ramadan.

1. Begin with Dua

Make Dua that Allah give you and your family the sincerity, strength, motivation and wisdom to do this. Dawa is hard work, and it needs preparation, commitment and organization.

2. Put up a Ramadan banner on your door

This can be something handmade or something more formal.

But don't stop there. Print out a factsheet on Ramadan and stick that on the door to educate readers passing by about the blessed month and what it means to Muslims. Include some pictures of Ramadan (i.e. everyone sitting together and eating for Sehri and Iftar, what kind of food is served, etc.)

3. Send neighbors Iftar snacks

Include a note with the food that the month of Ramadan is here and you are sharing your joy with them.

You can offer snacks that are not just "American" but also ethnic, especially things like Pakoras, Samosas, and other finger foods. Include index cards with the snacks listing all of the ingredients. This will help neighbors avoid food that causes allergies.

4. Give kids Ramadan Mubarak balloons and candy

Let your neighbors' kids also feel the happiness of Ramadan by including chocolate and candy among your snacks. Balloons also add a nice touch, and if you can get some printed which have "Ramadan Mubarak" written on them, they may remember the blessed month even after it has passed.

5. Publish Ramadan information in your neighborhood newsletter

If you are part of a tenants' association, a group within your housing complex or your neighborhood block parents' association and they publish a newsletter, inform them about Ramadan and prepare a short write-up about the month. Don't just present dry facts about Ramadan though. Discuss how your family celebrates it, or how you celebrated it back home. This is a great way of informing many more neighbors about Ramadan.

6. Have a neighborhood Iftar gathering

You don't have to invite everyone. Perhaps just the closest neighbors can attend this event. Send handmade invitations for an "Iftar gathering" at most a week in advance (avoid the word "party" as it may be misunderstood to mean a gathering including alcohol, etc.).

Ask about allergies or other food issues before establishing the menu. Include American and ethnic food.

Also, have some written material on Ramadan available for your guests. You can print out this factsheet and put it on some fancy paper to add to the festive air of the evening.

At the gathering:

Be cordial, generous and friendly, but maintain Islamic rules of behavior and modesty. This should not be a "party" in the common understanding, but more of a religious celebration that is spiritual and respectful to all.

Don't impose information. Just let guests ask questions, if they want to. As well, be ready for questions about Islam and violence/terrorism, the oppression of women, etc. Give neighbors the benefit of the doubt and clarify their misunderstanding in a calm, gentle manner.

Talk about Ramadan not just in America, but also in different Muslim countries. How it differs in terms of what kinds of foods are served or timing, etc. This will make Ramadan come alive and be seen as something real and spiritual versus just another religious obligation.

7. Get your kids on it

Tell your kids to inform other neighbors' kids what Ramadan is all about and have the children invite their classmates to your Iftar gatherings.

8. Talk about what Ramadan means to you

What's it like to fast? How do you work/go to school and still fast? What kind of food do Muslims eat during Iftar and Sehri? These are some questions you may be asked. Don't just point your guests to the pamphlets. Tell them and use some personal examples they can relate to.
Logged

Anonymous
Bro
Sr. Member
*

Reps: 224
Posts: 355


ANONYMOUS Post


« Reply #5 on: Oct 03, 2008 09:09 AM »

Do you worry about the hand shake? Is it better to leave the food with a note and go?
Logged

This post submitted using the ANONYMOUS button on the main Madina menu. Please reply here publicly so that the original poster can read any replies.

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: