// What I Learned and Heard From Two Days Among American Muslims
    Peace be upon you,
    Welcome to Madinat Al-Muslimeen, the City of the Muslims. Please feel free to visit the different hot spots around the Madina and post any discussion, articles, suggestions, comments, art, poetry, events, recipes, etc etc. Basically anything you would like to share with your sisters and brothers!! Non-muslims are also of course quite welcome to share their comments. If this is your first time here, you need to register with the city council. Once you register you have 15 days to post your mandatory introduction and then you will be upgraded to a Madina Citizen, God Willing. Please note that our city does have regulations which are listed in the city constitution. Read them carefully before moving in. P.S. - You can also post anonymously if you wish. P.S.S. - Also be sure to check out our ARCHIVES from 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 & 2007. :)

Random Quote: The Righteous Salaf were as fearful of their good deeds being squandered, or not being accepted, as the present generation is certain that their neglect would be forgiven. - Hasan al-Basri
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What I Learned and Heard From Two Days Among American Muslims  (Read 2896 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 279
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7144


I heart the Madina


WWW
« on: Sep 07, 2008 11:18 AM »


What I Learned and Heard From Two Days Among American Muslims

Robert Parham
09-05-08

The annual convention of the Islamic Society of North America was more like an annual convention of Baptists than most Baptists would want to know: leaders wrapped the will of God around appeals for funds; scripture citation was frequent; cell phones rang at inopportune times; participants were more interested in hallway fellowship than platform presentations; displays sold books, CDs, DVDs, religious trinkets and hair loss-prevention products. Some speakers were dynamic; others were pedantic. Some attendees were smartly dressed; others were casually clad.

Unlike Baptist conventions of the South, the ISNA convention had more strollers, more teenagers and a lot more racial and ethnic diversity. Many adults spoke with an accent (although most children were linguistically as American as apple pie). Only one or two women wore the burqa. Most had headscarves. A number lacked any head coverings.

 

Rank-and-file members and leaders showed more hospitality than I've received at any number of Baptist meetings. 

 

Thumbing through the Saturday morning program, I finally decided to attend the 75-minute workshop titled "Thinking Outside the Mosque: How Muslim Institutions Can Change America."

 

Little did I know that I would hear one of the most compelling and significant Muslim American leaders—Hamza Yusuf—who converted to Islam as a teenager and co-directs the Zaytuna Institute. Much of what he said would resonate in Baptist churches.

 

Yusuf said early in his presentation: "The idea today of liberty in the United States has become licentiousness. People are free…to surrender themselves to the worst qualities of their selves."

 

Toward the end of his presentation, he told a packed room with every seat taken and every aisle filled with attentive Muslims: "Moral actions have physical implications in the real world…. [W]hen you pollute you get global warming…. [W]hen you do things that are wrong, things in the physical world come back to affect you. It is the law of cause and effect."

 

"People want to deny this aspect of human society, of the moral universe that we live in. But we are religious people and we are committed to this view. It is dangerous to point the finger at any individual and say God that affected them with this, that or the other. We don't have any right to do that. That is true. But when bad things happen, it is often as a direct result of what we have wrought….This is the koranic and biblical perspective of the world and until we return to that view we are just deceiving ourselves," he said.

 

Yusuf noted earlier that European Christians once placed churches at the center of their cities, because God was at the center of their lives. But now, he said: "We put malls in the center of our cities. The most important thing for modern man is consumption. It is just buying and spending."

 

Warning about mosque building, Yusuf pointed out that the worst type of money is the money spent on buildings.

 

"Sometimes in building the building, we forget what is meant to be inside the building…. You have to have meanings before you have blocks," he said, lamenting that the centrality of God and the purpose of the mosque are often lost.

 

"Islam is … a state of being," he said, in which one submits one's entire being to God.

 

Yusuf asked, "What is taqwa? Taqwa (consciousness of God or fear of God) is a state of being in which a person has a conscious awareness of God. And so their actions are in accordance with what God has dictated."

 

Another workshop panelist, Ayesha Gray Henry, also an American convert, talked about showing the way of Islam without shoving it down the throats of others.

 

"I don't say 'the Qur'an says' … I just help people," she said. "One of the biggest contributions that Muslims can make is being who they are."

 

In another venue, Sayyid Syeed, ISNA's national interfaith director, reported that the All Dulles Area Muslim Society collected funds to help rebuild a Christian church burned down in Pakistan, a story unreported in the American press.

 

In the Muslim-Baptist taskforce meeting, Syeed recalled a Southern Baptist Convention booklet on praying for Muslims at Ramadan, targeting Islamic believers during their holiest period of fasting and praying. He said the ISNA ordered 800 booklets to teach Muslim children about the lack of understanding of Islam.

 

Goodwill Baptists have much in common with goodwill Muslims. One thing is without doubt: If Baptist Christians and Muslims are not at peace, then much of the world can't be at peace. From what I saw and heard, goodwill Muslims may be trying a lot harder to be peacemakers than goodwill Baptists.
LeylaNur
Sis
Jr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 0
LeylaNur has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 91


Remembrance of Allah is the true source of peace..


« Reply #1 on: Sep 07, 2008 08:16 PM »

 mashallahsis That's a good article..

I especially liked the part about the religious institutions in the centers of the cities and now they are malls..

The part that rang REALLY strong for me though, is the money being wasted on buildings. In the U.S. (especially around Washington, DC suburbs where I'm originally from), they keep making bigger and bigger new churches. I've never understood this. The churches they already have barely ever seem to be full.

I've never been able to comprehend how they can spend literally MILLIONS on a church building that won't see too much use except as for events (weddings/funerals and maybe Christmas/Easter).. If they were TRUE Christians following the example of Jesus (pbuh), I think they'd find much better uses for that money (like the poor, straving, orphaned, sick) and try to fill up the empty churches only a few miles down the road.

Often it would make me sick.  Sad

I try to remember to count my blessings each day because I have many:

To be thankful for my health, and that of my loved ones, the presence of my husband and the continuation of our marriage, that we can pay our bills and have food on the table..

So many blessings but often, so little thanks!
Faizah
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
Faizah has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 365



« Reply #2 on: Sep 07, 2008 11:43 PM »

Interesting article although the author starts with points that it is similar in scope to Baptist conventions and that's scary.  Indeed Islamic conferences have become more like big fundraising events rather than knowledge transfer events. 

The high cost of attending (registration fees; lodging; transportation; meals; incidentals) makes it fiscally impractical if not impossible for many people to attend and therefore gives it an elitist feel (not good).  Every time one of these conventions come up I always want to go but once I realize that I'd be looking at upwards of $1000 to cover everything I realize that the money could be better spent elsewhere rather than be irresponsible.

Sadly the author spoke of the stereotype that is held when he referenced "American" converts as this phrase is applied to only one group.

Fa'izah
LeylaNur
Sis
Jr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 0
LeylaNur has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 91


Remembrance of Allah is the true source of peace..


« Reply #3 on: Sep 08, 2008 02:37 AM »

I've always thought they should do REGIONAL ISNA events.. That way people can drive there and only spend a day and thus cut out a lot of the unnecessary expense.

For example, I live in Philadelphia.. If the event was held in New York City, Baltimore, Washington DC, Atlantic City, etc. I could easily go for the day, spend one night if I chose to, or drive back home. No problems.. But Ohio? I wouldn't even think there'd be a large population of Muslims there so that makes a LOT of us have to commute at a large price. Bad planning on ISNA's part, methinks!

I think also having local ones (Northeast, Mideast, Southeast, Northwest, Midwest, Southwest, Central, etc.) would also be MORE beneficial since you can start to focus on some LOCAL issues of importance to that particular community.

I think the current model isn't serving the Muslim community as it should.

I try to remember to count my blessings each day because I have many:

To be thankful for my health, and that of my loved ones, the presence of my husband and the continuation of our marriage, that we can pay our bills and have food on the table..

So many blessings but often, so little thanks!
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 279
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7144


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #4 on: Sep 08, 2008 03:57 AM »

wsalam,

lol they do have regional isnas!! check out their website: isna.net  They have a list of the conferences they have every year, including finance conferences, education conferences, imam conferences etc.. they had a few northeast regional isnas in syracuse for the northeast region the last few years but no one goes even though it's quite drivable from anywhere in the northeast. i think atlanta and houston every year and who knows where else.

ws

I've always thought they should do REGIONAL ISNA events.. That way people can drive there and only spend a day

I think also having local ones (Northeast, Mideast, Southeast, Northwest, Midwest, Southwest, Central, etc.) would also be MORE beneficial since you can start to focus on some LOCAL issues of importance to that particular community.

I think the current model isn't serving the Muslim community as it should.
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #5 on: Sep 08, 2008 03:19 PM »

JazakAllahu Kair..

that was a very interesting article.. Any more reviews on ISNA?Smiley

salaam
cheese
Guest
« Reply #6 on: Sep 08, 2008 11:43 PM »

I’ve never been to America so wouldn’t know a ISNA if it bit me on the,,,,,

But this:


“Warning about mosque building, Yusuf pointed out that the worst type of money is the money spent on buildings.”,
Together with this:

“In another venue, Sayyid Syeed, ISNA's national interfaith director, reported that the All Dulles Area Muslim Society collected funds to help rebuild a Christian church burned down in Pakistan, a story unreported in the American press.”

Got me thinking, I don’t think I like ISNA.

What is the moral the worse thing to spend money of is building Musjids but the best is building churches?


"Sometimes in building the building, we forget what is meant to be inside the building…. You have to have meanings before you have blocks," he said, lamenting that the centrality of God and the purpose of the mosque are often lost.

How about the centrality of God in building churches?
Would that church built with ISNA funds be used to worship Allah in his unity, or a trinity?


That ISNA seems to be very pleasing to that Baptist, Shame it isn’t so pleasing to this Muslim.
With Muslims like that, why pay for Missionaries?
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 279
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7144


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #7 on: Sep 09, 2008 06:35 AM »

Salam,

America is a very different place than England. And Muslim society and life here is very different as well. We have numerous hugely built mega mosques and buildings... that are EMPTY most of the time. I know of one Mosque not too far from here that has a fountain with different color lights that cost $10,000 about 10 years ago. AND they never turn it on now because it's too expensive to run!! (That's 5 thousand pounds for u lot.) Do you understand now what he is saying? What's the point of more buildings when there is no Islam? What about our youth? What about our education? What about all our problems and what's happening around the world? What about the Muslims starving around the world? What about all the political problems? You of most should agree with that.

About 20 years ago a Muslim guy wrote this futuristic novel about how Islam in the US would be. In it, he describes empty Mosques... that are abandoned, broken down and filled with cobwebs. What is the point of that? If we build things, they should be for a real purpose and for longevity. We need to invest in our youth and our islam more than making more buildings.

As for giving money to help another faith in need, I can see why you have a problem with that, but most Muslims would not. If your Mosque burned to the ground and a Christian wanted to donate some money out of kindness and respect would you refuse?

BTW ISNA = Islamic Society of North America's annual convention. Kind of like GPU for you guys.

ws

Faizah
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
Faizah has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 365



« Reply #8 on: Sep 09, 2008 12:43 PM »

Salaam

I agree that it is problematic when buildings are built to the tune of millions of dollars but they don't draw the people.  It seems that the "mega" anything is built for the sake of putting on a show.  Sadly the same holds true for the huge mosques.  It is supposed to be the center of the community - a place for prayer; learning; socializing; building community and strengthening the bonds of brother/sister hood.  If the majority of the people don't feel welcome and there are large egos then people will stay away.  No one wants to be in a place where they are made to feel "less than" or like intruders/outsiders.   And it's worse for women when they are relegated to "lesser" spaces as if they are to be hidden because they are unwelcome in the mosque.  It is this that keeps people away and can lead to worse and that is tragic.  They young don't often want to be there because they are basically told that they have no valid input.  How any of that is Islamic is beyond me.

I don't see a problem in helping anyone in need.  And helping rebuild a church shows people that Muslims are not anti-everyone else (no wonder that show of assistance wasn't widely reported in the media; it goes contrary to the belief that people want to hold).

I sadly believe that for the most part the ones who have taken charge have lost sight of the important and necessary values.

Fa'izah



a_desert_rose
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 0
a_desert_rose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 310



« Reply #9 on: Sep 09, 2008 09:03 PM »


Quote
I know of one Mosque not too far from here that has a fountain with different color lights that cost $10,000 about 10 years ago.

 Shocked You're right. America is a very different place from England! I've yet to hear about a mosque with that kind of ostentatious display here..

Quote
What's the point of more buildings when there is no Islam? What about our youth? What about our education? What about all our problems and what's happening around the world? What about the Muslims starving around the world? What about all the political problems? You of most should agree with that.

I think what brother cheese meant was that the money spent on the church could have been used for any of the things listed above (for the good of Muslims). Churches have loads of money to spend on refurbishments etc. anyway (here in the UK at least).

Wassalam
Fozia
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 124
Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 2663



« Reply #10 on: Sep 10, 2008 04:02 AM »

salam


In the UK, we generally tend to buy old churches as these are deserted and in need of repair, the masjids are slowly getting a little OTT here to but alhumdulillah we have not yet reached the multi-coloured fountain stage yet!

I think the biggest mosque so far is the planned one in east London, but it will incor-porate a library and youth centre type place with it I think.

Alhumdulillah most mosques I've seen myself are generally filled to overflowing around here (well on Fridays and Ramadan anyways).


Wassalaam

And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186
AbdulBasir
Bro
Jr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 8
AbdulBasir has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 81


« Reply #11 on: Sep 10, 2008 11:46 PM »


In the UK, we generally tend to buy old churches as these are deserted and in need of repair, the masjids are slowly getting a little OTT here to but alhumdulillah we have not yet reached the multi-coloured fountain stage yet!


salam

I heard once from a scholar that one of the biggest mistakes the Muslims in Europe did was buy old churches and convert them to masjids, because it reinforces the idea of Muslims coming into Europe, taking over, and wiping out the very core of European identity. Those churches may have been deserted, but they were the core of the European identity until recently, and it is not the best message to come in and effectively tear down that identity. Even though that wasn't the intention, that's how many Europeans see it, as part of the Muslim "threat" they get all worked up about.  It's not that the Muslims did anything wrong in buying these cheap properties (that happened to be churches), just that it wasn't the most prudent thing to do in the long run in terms of symbolism and perception. He was saying we should have just bought other properties instead and stayed away from the churches.



salam
cheese
Guest
« Reply #12 on: Sep 11, 2008 01:53 AM »

AbdulBasir

As Muslims have become more religious others have become less so. Most Muslims in the UK live in London, which does not have empty spaces to build on. Planning laws mean permission is needed to convert a house, a factory or a shop in to a place of worship because of “change of use”, this is very difficult and when it happens this is what upsets the locals.

When Muslims buy a church or a synagogue, no planning permission is required and locals aren’t upset. Why, your alim said something else?
This is because if a house was changed traffic, noise and parking would be affected.
The key issue is churches were sold by the church, synagogues by the Jews, if they didn’t want them to be changed they wouldn’t have sold them. But they have no choice, as they no longer have worshipers, and it is easer to sell it to Muslims than to a building developer because then they would have to apply for “change of use” which isn’t always given.

It would be easier and cheaper for Muslims to buy a building they could tear down and build a musjid from scratch but that isn’t possible due to change of use and planning laws. So we have no choice but to buy the churches. And when we do build from scratch on an area that used to be a shop, house or factory that is what upsets the natives because they fear parking problems noise and traffic.


I think people who defended what happened in ISNA see the two statements separately while I put it together and see blatant hypocrisy.
But I would be just as against them if I saw them individually.
Why?
What does our Prophet pbh say about building Musjids, and what will Allah build for them in the next life?
If your Musjids are empty, then you better start filling them. But even if they are empty, that doesn’t mean you don’t need to build more. What I mean is wherever there are Muslims, that area needs a Musjid, even if other areas have empty Musjids.

Secondly who are you trying to please with your donations?
Are you trying to please Allah?
Or are you trying to please kaffir?
If you build a Musjid, where Allah is worshiped in his unity, that is a good thing.
If you build a church where Jesus is worshiped in a trinity, you are helping people perform shirk. I don’t care what scholars you bring to try and justify that act, that isn’t a good way to spend your money.
And this is doubly bad, because the church is being built in Pakistan. We are not talking about Syria or Egypt with a native Christian population. We are talking about Pakistan where Churches use that money you give them to pay the poor and starving to convert.

So getting back to why I see hypocrisy. We’ll when it comes to Musjids, there are better uses. Better uses like building Churches? If you meant feeding people, why not give that money that was donated to missionaries in Pakistan to feed people?

Yes a church may have been burnt down in Pakistan. But while that was happening American soldiers blow up hundreds of Sunni Musjids in Iraq, Israel use American money to destroy Musjids too. Wouldn’t rebuilding some of those Musjids destroyed by your taxes be a better use of your money?
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 279
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7144


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #13 on: Sep 11, 2008 05:31 AM »

That's interesting about the perception of Europeans about "Muslims taking over"....

cont. later
AbdulBasir
Bro
Jr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 8
AbdulBasir has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 81


« Reply #14 on: Sep 11, 2008 11:50 PM »

salam

cheese: I, nor the scholar, were not discounting the practicality of Muslims purchasing old churches, but rather the symbolism of it and how many Europeans have perceived it. It's about looking at the bigger picture, just as the Muslim experience in Europe is more than just the experience in London. And for your information, this scholar who said this is primarily UK-based.

jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 279
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7144


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #15 on: Sep 12, 2008 04:42 AM »

D'oh this is the fourth time I tried to write here, just keep getting distracted. Busy ramadan!!

So I was saying that's sad about the impression Europeans are getting. There are so many "THE MUSLIMS ARE TAKING OVER!!!" type articles in the press that are just so extreme over there. I really wonder if that's like a leftover crusades type of mentality. I mean so what if Muslims are being religious and buying old churches. I just find it weird that they think the Muslims are taking over when they live in ghettos and are pretty much marginalized and completely discriminated against in society in Europe. What exactly are they afraid of??

Anyway we had the opportunity over here of buying an old church to convert it into a mosque before our current place.  And it was nice because everything was all set up via zoning and parking as was mentioned. It is extremely difficult to get zoning and town approval for a Mosque nowadays even in the US. For a new Mosque we are building here we had numerous people who attended the "zoning meeting" and had "questions" and "objections". I mean why who cares right, but as you know Muslims are a political hot ticket item right now. So I can understand why it's so much easier to buy an existing religious building. Anyway the church building here was too old and considered not sound, so we didn't buy it. But I do think some Christians would have been offended if they came to visit and were told "this was once a church" even though it was abandoned and sold off. I'd be offended if I went to a Church and they proudly told us "this was once a mosque". So not sure what the solution is. Maybe we could buy those old churches and turn them into "community centers" instead of mosques. In the US we have pretty much enough mosques. Now we are in the "expansion" phase of our structures. Adding more prayer area, rooms, parking, adding schools, community centers, recreation areas, playgrounds and so on.
cheese
Guest
« Reply #16 on: Sep 12, 2008 06:12 AM »

I’ve heard the Muslims are taking over slogan as well, but seriously the only people I’ve heard say it are evangelicals, Nazis and Zionist Jews most of whom are atheists.
But honestly, I’ve never heard them say it against converting churches and synagogues in to Musjids. I’ve heard them say it against building fresh Musjids many times, but never against a conversion.
Why?
There is absolutely nothing they can gain from attacking a conversion. As there is no change of use, objections can’t stop the conversion.

Why do they say it against building Musjids on fresh plots or plots used for other purposes?
Objecting to the change of use can stop the musjid from gaining planning permission. Examples off the top of my head are a Muslim owned dairy in Cornwall wanting to turn a old disused out building in to a Musjid for its workers. This was objected to by Nazis and the Nazis wan.
The proposed construction of the giant tabligi musjid on waste ground in Stratford, after it was given planning permission, evangelicals and Nazis worked together to try and discredit it claiming Tabligi jamat is a terrorist organisation trying to take over the world and the Musjid is really a terrorist training camp.

So I agree with you that people do say Muslims are taking over due to new Musjids but:
1)   The people who are saying it couldn’t care less about new Musjids. BNP say it as a legal way of saying kick all “Knee Grows and Pakis” out of the country.
Evangelicals say it as a politically correct way of saying ban all other religions and beliefs, and impose evangelical Christian beliefs on everyone by force.
Zionists Jews join in because if people thought Muslims are bad they might be less likely to notice the genocide going on in Palestine.
2)   They say it about Musjids being built on fresh land or land that was used for something other then a place of worship, not against church conversions.

I have heard one Christian clergy stating that when old churches are sold, other Christian denominations should be given priority above Muslims though, but this was a long time ago, and it was said to the church not to the wider audience.
No one agreed with him and he was attacked by his own people for saying it.
Presently the Christianity is near enough dead here. There are probably more Muslims who pray in Musjids than Christians who pray in churches so the church owns loads of empty disused churches.


 I am anti church conversion in one particular case too. Shikh Nazim’s sufi Mosque in St Ann’s road. A lot of Churches are listed buildings; meaning new owners aren’t allowed to change them. They bought a church, and turned it in to a musjid. A musjid covered in crosses and with a great big idol Mariam alaysalam on the outside, the front wall also has a Mushrik verse written on it in Latin sating some thing which is clear shirk.
They are legally not allowed to change any of that, as the building is protected.

But they have made a change. The inside doesn’t have pictures of Jesus; instead it has a great big picture of Shakh nazim in the prayer hall.
I am not anti Sufi, but this kind of behaviour is unacceptable.
I hope they have removed that picture from the prayer hall, as I hope they have stopped touching his feet and making dua to him in his absence.
 
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: