// Watch PBS: The Last Enemy Oct. 5 to Nov. 2nd
    Peace be upon you,
    Welcome to Madinat Al-Muslimeen, the City of the Muslims. Please feel free to visit the different hot spots around the Madina and post any discussion, articles, suggestions, comments, art, poetry, events, recipes, etc etc. Basically anything you would like to share with your sisters and brothers!! Non-muslims are also of course quite welcome to share their comments. If this is your first time here, you need to register with the city council. Once you register you have 15 days to post your mandatory introduction and then you will be upgraded to a Madina Citizen, God Willing. Please note that our city does have regulations which are listed in the city constitution. Read them carefully before moving in. P.S. - You can also post anonymously if you wish. P.S.S. - Also be sure to check out our ARCHIVES from 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 & 2007. :)

Random Quote: If you are going through hell, keep going. - Winston Churchill
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Watch PBS: The Last Enemy Oct. 5 to Nov. 2nd  (Read 3658 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 279
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7144


I heart the Madina


WWW
« on: Sep 30, 2008 10:12 PM »


Looks reallllyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy interesting!! -- J.

====================
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/lastenemy/index.html

A half century ago Robert Orwell predicted Big Brother's eye watching over everyone. The scenario seemed preposterous, scary, and so far, far away that future generations would have to deal with the issue. Not us. Well, 1984 has come and gone and privacy as we once knew it has disappeared. We have become a surveillance society. Cameras in plain view follow my actions at the bank, at intersections, through toll booths, in airport terminals, and while shopping. Credit card companies follow my every purchase, phone companies detail every call I make, and online libraries, bookstores, and movie rentals track my personal preferences. Imagine my chagrin when a computerized gizmo makes suggestions based on past purchases. Google and Firefox brazenly record each site I visit, and from space satellites take images of my neighborhood that are so detailed that I can see my car parked on its pad.

It boggles the mind to think what would happen if some entity decided to brand me by my credit cards, driver's license, passport, citizenship papers and other vital pieces of identification. How would I be able to travel or do banking or purchase a house or do anything that required legal documentation? Or what if some beaurocrat decided that I belonged on a public enemies' list or that I required extra surveillance without my knowledge, and that I had no course of appeal because all of this was done in secret on behalf of the state?

The Last Enemy, a modern drama written by screenwriter Peter Berry, prompted these thoughts. This five-part contemporary drama, will be show on Masterpiece Contemporary on PBS Sunday October 5th through November 2.

Spurred by heightening surveillance and identity laws in contemporary England, Peter Berry crafted The Last Enemy as a cautionary fable of post-9/11 society, where technological and political trends are converging on a culture that is the antithesis of everything represented by Britain's ancient charter of individual liberty, Magna Carta.

"There are those who would argue that the innocent have nothing to hide," says Berry, "but soon the innocent are going to have to prove that they are in fact innocent - suspects until proven innocent by the data logged on their ID cards. Ordinary citizens will become the enemy - the last enemy."

jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 279
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7144


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #1 on: Oct 08, 2008 04:08 AM »

From the PBS Blog:

Surveillance Society--Science Fiction or Our Certain Future?

As I watched the new PBS movie The Last Enemy, I couldn't help but feel a certain uncomfortable mixture of resignation and dread. Not only does the movie depict a total surveillance society, but it does so quite convincingly. It makes you wonder. Are scenarios like those depicted in the film simply science fiction, or are they a glimpse into an inevitable future?

There is no doubt that surveillance tech is on the rise, and is starting to quickly infiltrate the planet. Earlier this year a small unmanned drone manufactured by Honeywell International, was announced that is capable of hovering and "seeing" using electro-optic or infrared sensor. If this drone "spy-in-the sky" wins Federal Aviation Administration approval, the Miami-Dade Police Department will start flying the 14-pound (6.3 kg) drone over urban areas with an eye toward full-fledged employment in crime fighting.

"There's been controversies all around about putting up surveillance cameras in public areas," said Howard Simon, Florida director of the American Civil Liberties Union.

"Technological developments can be used by law enforcement in a way that enhances public safety," he said. "But every enhanced technology also contains a threat of further erosion of privacy."

The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is also funding research for stealth surveillance robots that can fly and are the size and appearance of a common housefly. They believe the robot's small size and fly-like appearance will be an invaluable tool in their eavesdropping arsenal.

"Nature makes the world's best fliers," says Robert Wood, leader of Harvard's robotic-fly project and a professor at the university's school of engineering and applied sciences. They chose the tiny housefly for the model because "you probably wouldn't notice a fly in the room, but you certainly would notice a hawk."

If you're paranoid about being spied on--get out your flyswatters. A life-size, robotic fly has already taken flight at Harvard University. Weighing only 60 milligrams, with a wingspan of three centimeters, the tiny robot's movements are modeled on those of a real fly. While work remains to be done on the mechanical insect, the researchers say that such small flying machines will likely eventually be used to spy.

The US National Security Agency has already been the topic of angry public debate after it was revealed that for years the agency had been reading emails and tapping phones without a warrant--actions explicitly forbidden by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. This legislation was the result of the violations the last time a US president (Nixon) authorized the wiretapping of Americans citizens.

It makes you wonder what James Madison, the foremost architect of the U.S. Constitution would say about all this. After all, he did famously write in the Federalist Papers, "If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy."

Yet some say that we should willingly give up our privacy with the argument that "Why would you care unless you have something to hide?" But that argument presupposes that everyone who works within the government is always completely virtuous and honest. Indeed perhaps, it wouldn't be so worrisome if people felt that they could always rely on their government to make wise, judicial decisions in regards to what they do with the data gathered. However, increasingly people do not have that kind of faith and trust in government. Certainly politicians have not proven themselves to be beyond corruption, manipulation and deceit.

On the other hand, with the never-ending "War on Terror" and the accompanying culture of fear, increasing surveillance is no longer seen as an option, but as an imperative. While many people cringe at the thought of living in a world where their every move can be traced and monitored, many others welcome the thought of having "Big Brother" keep a closer eye on them. Individual humans are now the big threat. Since 9/11, some of the best scientific minds in the defense industry have switched their concentration from tracking nuclear missiles to tracking individuals who may be suicide bombers.

According to some opinion polls in both the US and Britain, a whopping 75% of those surveyed wanted more, not less, surveillance. For better or worse that wish is quickly being fulfilled.

It takes just a moment for a computer to capture an individual's image, calculate their exact height and their "Gait DNA". Gait DNA the code for how an individual walks. Eventually, the goal is to have a system whereby a facial image can be matched to your gait, your height, your weight and other elements, so a computer will be able to instantly identify whoever is being monitored.

Professor Rama Challapa of Maryland University and his team are busy inventing the next generation of citizen surveillance. He says tracking individuals shouldn't be a problem.

"We rely on just 30 frames - about one second - to get a picture we can work with," he explained. "As you walk through a crowd, we'll be able to track you," said Professor Challapa. "These are all things that don't need the cooperation of the individual."

But so far, there's no way for the government to actually peep inside our homes, right? Well, according to scientist Ian Kitajima says that's about to change too.  He helped developed a new sense-through-the-wall technology that uses radio waves to give a fairly clear picture of what's going on inside of buildings.

"Each individual has a characteristic profile," explained Kitajima, holding a green rectangular box that looked like a TV remote control.

His company, Oceanit, will test the device with the Hawaiian National Guard in Iraq next year. The technology is so sensitive that it can even detect breathing and heart rates.

"First, you can tell whether someone is dead or alive on the battlefield," explained Kitajima. "But it will also show whether someone inside a house is looking to harm you, because if they are, their heart rate will be raised. And 10 years from now, the technology will be much smarter. We'll scan a person with one of these things and tell what they're actually thinking."

But what will privacy mean in a world where a computer can read your mind without your knowledge? What happens to freedom when those in power have access to even the most private information imaginable?

Those are questions that we may live to see the answers.

 

Watch first episode online here: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/lastenemy/watch.html

Fozia
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 124
Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 2663



« Reply #2 on: Oct 08, 2008 11:22 AM »

salam

OK for reference, the chap I believe was called George Orwell (if we're talking about the guy who wrote 1984)


Wassalaam

And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 279
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7144


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #3 on: Oct 17, 2008 03:35 AM »

Watched the first episode... kinda racy there uhhhhhhhh??? this is pbs?? and i don't like the lead guy.....he's just so blech and wooden. i understand he's a scientist and all but really he's dull as dishwater. and did u see mathew goode introduce everything WHY DIDNT THEY PICK HIM. he woulda been aweeeeeeeeeeeeeesome. he is just so amazing and a great actor so personable. why doesn't his career pick up??
anyways lets see what happens next.
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 279
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7144


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #4 on: Nov 19, 2008 06:24 AM »

I watched the whole thing and it definitely came together in the end. The sad part is that this world is true in our world today and perhaps will be exactly alike within 5 to 10 years. Seriously frightening. -- J.

(Someone once claimed to me that a mosque near here was bugged by "bees on the windowsills", i thought he was crazy.)

(The ending...I mean did they have to? But I guess they had to. Wow.)

=====================

Remotely Connected
"The Last Enemy"
Masterpiece Contemporary

Surveillance Society--Science Fiction or Our Certain Future?


As I watched the new PBS movie The Last Enemy, I couldn't help but feel a certain uncomfortable mixture of resignation and dread. Not only does the movie depict a total surveillance society, but it does so quite convincingly. It makes you wonder. Are scenarios like those depicted in the film simply science fiction, or are they a glimpse into an inevitable future?


There is no doubt that surveillance tech is on the rise, and is starting to quickly infiltrate the planet. Earlier this year a small unmanned drone manufactured by Honeywell International, was announced that is capable of hovering and "seeing" using electro-optic or infrared sensor. If this drone "spy-in-the sky" wins Federal Aviation Administration approval, the Miami-Dade Police Department will start flying the 14-pound (6.3 kg) drone over urban areas with an eye toward full-fledged employment in crime fighting.

"There's been controversies all around about putting up surveillance cameras in public areas," said Howard Simon, Florida director of the American Civil Liberties Union.

"Technological developments can be used by law enforcement in a way that enhances public safety," he said. "But every enhanced technology also contains a threat of further erosion of privacy."

The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is also funding research for stealth surveillance robots that can fly and are the size and appearance of a common housefly.
They believe the robot's small size and fly-like appearance will be an invaluable tool in their eavesdropping arsenal.

"Nature makes the world's best fliers," says Robert Wood, leader of Harvard's robotic-fly project and a professor at the university's school of engineering and applied sciences. They chose the tiny housefly for the model because "you probably wouldn't notice a fly in the room, but you certainly would notice a hawk."

If you're paranoid about being spied on--get out your flyswatters. A life-size, robotic fly has already taken flight at Harvard University. Weighing only 60 milligrams, with a wingspan of three centimeters, the tiny robot's movements are modeled on those of a real fly. While work remains to be done on the mechanical insect, the researchers say that such small flying machines will likely eventually be used to spy.

The US National Security Agency has already been the topic of angry public debate after it was revealed that for years the agency had been reading emails and tapping phones without a warrant--actions explicitly forbidden by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. This legislation was the result of the violations the last time a US president (Nixon) authorized the wiretapping of Americans citizens.

It makes you wonder what James Madison, the foremost architect of the U.S. Constitution would say about all this. After all, he did famously write in the Federalist Papers, "If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy."

Yet some say that we should willingly give up our privacy with the argument that "Why would you care unless you have something to hide?" But that argument presupposes that everyone who works within the government is always completely virtuous and honest. Indeed perhaps, it wouldn't be so worrisome if people felt that they could always rely on their government to make wise, judicial decisions in regards to what they do with the data gathered. However, increasingly people do not have that kind of faith and trust in government. Certainly politicians have not proven themselves to be beyond corruption, manipulation and deceit.

On the other hand, with the never-ending "War on Terror" and the accompanying culture of fear, increasing surveillance is no longer seen as an option, but as an imperative. While many people cringe at the thought of living in a world where their every move can be traced and monitored, many others welcome the thought of having "Big Brother" keep a closer eye on them. Individual humans are now the big threat. Since 9/11, some of the best scientific minds in the defense industry have switched their concentration from tracking nuclear missiles to tracking individuals who may be suicide bombers. 

According to some opinion polls in both the US and Britain, a whopping 75% of those surveyed wanted more, not less, surveillance. For better or worse that wish is quickly being fulfilled.

It takes just a moment for a computer to capture an individual's image, calculate their exact height and their "Gait DNA". Gait DNA the code for how an individual walks. Eventually, the goal is to have a system whereby a facial image can be matched to your gait, your height, your weight and other elements, so a computer will be able to instantly identify whoever is being monitored.


Professor Rama Challapa of Maryland University and his team are busy inventing the next generation of citizen surveillance. He says tracking individuals shouldn't be a problem.

"We rely on just 30 frames - about one second - to get a picture we can work with," he explained. "As you walk through a crowd, we'll be able to track you," said Professor Challapa. "These are all things that don't need the cooperation of the individual."

But so far, there's no way for the government to actually peep inside our homes, right? Well, according to scientist Ian Kitajima says that's about to change too.  He helped developed a new sense-through-the-wall technology that uses radio waves to give a fairly clear picture of what's going on inside of buildings.

"Each individual has a characteristic profile," explained Kitajima, holding a green rectangular box that looked like a TV remote control.

His company, Oceanit, will test the device with the Hawaiian National Guard in Iraq next year. The technology is so sensitive that it can even detect breathing and heart rates.

"First, you can tell whether someone is dead or alive on the battlefield," explained Kitajima. "But it will also show whether someone inside a house is looking to harm you, because if they are, their heart rate will be raised. And 10 years from now, the technology will be much smarter. We'll scan a person with one of these things and tell what they're actually thinking."

But what will privacy mean in a world where a computer can read your mind without your knowledge? What happens to freedom when those in power have access to even the most private information imaginable?

Those are questions that we may live to see the answers.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: