// Turkish Court Proves there is no point in voting, Dejjal's democracy hates Islam
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Poll
Question: So what did voting achieve?
It showed Muslims obey Man made laws above Allah? - 1 (50%)
It showed Muslims believe in Kufr above Shariyah? - 0 (0%)
It stoped people watching tv while they vote? - 0 (0%)
It showed the government which areas voted for Islam, so they would know who to exterminate - 0 (0%)
It showed Democracy is Hypocrisy, and it is time for the Muslims to impose Islam instead of voting on it by taking the country by force - 1 (50%)
Total Voters: 0

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Author Topic: Turkish Court Proves there is no point in voting, Dejjal's democracy hates Islam  (Read 1242 times)
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cheese
Guest
« on: Oct 23, 2008 06:20 PM »


Turkish court defends quashing Muslim scarf reform

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By Ibon Villelabeitia
REUTERS

8:17 a.m. October 22, 2008

ANKARA – Lifting a ban on women wearing the Muslim headscarf at university violates Turkey's secular constitution, the country's top court said on Wednesday, defending a decision against the ruling AK Party.

In a legal reasoning that appeared to end any hope for the Islamist-rooted AK Party to revive the sensitive headscarf issue, the Constitutional Court said that while wearing a headscarf was 'an individual choice and a freedom', lifting the ban was 'openly against the principles of secularism'.

SDSU
The Constitutional Court, a bastion of Turkey's secular founding principles, overturned in June a constitutional amendment sponsored by the AK Party to lift the restriction, but only issued its long-awaited reasoning on Wednesday.

The AK Party, which denies accusations by secularist opponents of harbouring an Islamist agenda, said it would respect the constitution. It had first reacted angrily to the ruling, accusing the court of violating the constitution.

'We do not have any intention of undermining the republic's essential principles,' Justice Minister Mehmet Ali Sahin said.

The headscarf issue is one of the most highly charged in Turkey, a predominantly Sunni Muslim country with a secular constitution, and has long been a source of political instability in the European Union applicant.

Foreign investors, already dumping emerging markets assets due to the global financial crisis, are monitoring signs of political instability that could delay market-friendly reforms.

The AK Party, which has its roots in political Islam, sees it as a question of religious freedom, while securalists see it as proof the government wants to impose sharia law by stealth. The party repeatedly denies those charges.

The AK Party, which has a huge majority in parliament, passed the amendment earlier this year, angering a secularist establishment of judges and army generals.

Another attempt to lift the headscarf ban would require a constitutional reform and broad social consensus, an unlikely event in a country deeply polarised over the role of Islam.

'The amendments in articles 10 and 42 are openly against the principle of secularism because procedurally they mean using religion as a tool in politics, and breach other people's rights and cause public disorder by content,' the court said.

The headscarf reform was seen as a catalyst for a separate case, in which the same court narrowly voted in July not to close the AK Party on charges of Islamist activities. The court is expected to issue the reasoning of that case this week.

Cengiz Aktar, a professor at Istanbul's Bahcesehir University, said the court's reasoning ends any hope of bringing the headscarf issue back until a new constitution is written.

'This ruling not only ends the headscarf debate, but also any attempt to reform the constitution and the secularist regime,' Aktar said.

__________________ ______________

In Turkey the over welling majority of people voted for what they thought was an Islamic party. That party tried to make Hijab legal again, but it doesn’t matter how many people want Islam. Kufr systems don’t allow themselves to be replaced by Islam. Voting achieved nothing, and can never achieve anything. There are safeguards in place such as the constitution to make sure voting will achieve nothing.
Democracy is hypocrisy.
It doesn’t mater who you vote for, and how many vote. Kufr will always be imposed.
And in America, it doesn’t matter who you vote for, both candidates support Israel, both support American soldiers murdering Muslims in Afghanistan and Iraq.
So you can vote for your poster boy, but everything will remain the same and nothing will change. Because it isn’t the stooge that makes the laws, it is the learned elders of Zion and their long awaited leader Dejal the one eyed Jew.
So Hijab was illegal under secular parties, and it was illegal under Islamic parties and now the courts have proven it will always continue to be illegal under this kufr system of democracy. So it is time to take control of the military to take control of the state. This is how Mustafa Kemal the Jew removed the Khilafah and replaced it with democracy, and this is the only way we can replace democracy with Khilafah.
Everything else is just a waste of time, both in Muslim countries like Turkey and Kaffir countries like America.

nuh
Guest
« Reply #1 on: Oct 23, 2008 06:36 PM »

As salaam alaikum.

This stuff really upsets me.  Secular relativism is the new fascism.

Islamofascism my butt!

nuh
Str33t Rac3r
Guest
« Reply #2 on: Oct 28, 2008 03:52 PM »

How is removing a government ban on religious freedom against the  principles secularism.
nuh
Guest
« Reply #3 on: Oct 28, 2008 04:19 PM »

As salaam alaikum.

Turkey's constitution provides no freedom of religion clauses.

Why might that be?

Seems that only majority christian nations like Canada and the United States allow for the universal right of freedom of religion.

Why might that be?

What is the danger of a muslim majority in a 'democracy'?

You asked:

How is removing a government ban on religious freedom against the  principles secularism.

Seems that the principles of secularism sometimes mean:

"freedom of religion"

and sometimes mean:

"keep religion out"

Why the double standard?

Ma'as salaama,
nuh
 bro
Str33t Rac3r
Guest
« Reply #4 on: Oct 28, 2008 04:34 PM »

Why the double standard? I Think it's lost in the translation.
Secularism meaning governments and companies should not be able to even comment on anything considered religious.
nuh
Guest
« Reply #5 on: Oct 29, 2008 01:00 AM »

As salaam alaikum

Why the double standard? I Think it's lost in the translation.
Secularism meaning governments and companies should not be able to even comment on anything considered religious.

You saying it doesn't make it so.

Secularism as defined in christian nations is NOT the same as secularism as imposed on muslim nations. I would encourage you to read a little more on this issue -- it's a real eye opener.

Ma salaama,
nuh ibn
 bro
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