// If the World Could Vote, Who Would They Vote For, Obama or Mcain?
    Peace be upon you,
    Welcome to Madinat Al-Muslimeen, the City of the Muslims. Please feel free to visit the different hot spots around the Madina and post any discussion, articles, suggestions, comments, art, poetry, events, recipes, etc etc. Basically anything you would like to share with your sisters and brothers!! Non-muslims are also of course quite welcome to share their comments. If this is your first time here, you need to register with the city council. Once you register you have 15 days to post your mandatory introduction and then you will be upgraded to a Madina Citizen, God Willing. Please note that our city does have regulations which are listed in the city constitution. Read them carefully before moving in. P.S. - You can also post anonymously if you wish. P.S.S. - Also be sure to check out our ARCHIVES from 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 & 2007. :)

Random Quote: "If you do not have a sound heart then you better get one"- Shaykh Hamza Yusuf
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: If the World Could Vote, Who Would They Vote For, Obama or Mcain?  (Read 3001 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« on: Oct 24, 2008 03:32 PM »


Watching America Vote: Iran is Facinated

http://worldblog.msnbc.msn.com/archive/category/1115.aspx
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #1 on: Oct 25, 2008 05:31 PM »

Popular" Obama in Iraq
 
 
IslamOnline.net & News Agencies
 
 
 
 
 
Obama has confirmed his pledge to declare an end to the Iraq war once elected president. (Reuters)
 
BAGHDAD — Favored by many Iraqis for the White House, US Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama arrived in Iraq on Monday, July 21, on a fact-finding mission.
"Senator Barack Obama arrived in Iraq this morning as part of a Congressional delegation, along with Senators Jack Reed and Chuck Hagel," embassy spokesman Armand Cucciniello said, reported Agence France-Presse (AFP).

Obama will meet with Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, President Jalal Talabani and senior US military commanders to assess the situation in Iraq.

"The senators have a busy day ahead of them, as they meet with senior Iraqi officials, coalition leadership and officials from the US embassy. They will also meet with constituent service members and civilian staff working in Iraq," said Cucciniello.

The Illinois Senator, who visited Iraq in 2006, had spent the night in Kuwait after a visit to Kabul, where he pledged to downsize the number of US troops in Iraq and commit at least two more combat brigades to Afghanistan.

Obama's camp has said the aim of his tour is to make an on-the-ground assessment of the war in Iraq and to meet Iraqi leaders, whom he criticized for not doing enough to rebuild Iraq.

"Iraq's leaders have failed to invest tens of billions of dollars in oil revenues in rebuilding their own country, and they have not reached the political accommodation that was the stated purpose of the (US troop) surge," he said.

Obama has confirmed his pledge to declare an end to the Iraq war from the first day of his presidency if he wins in November, and to withdraw most US combat troops within 16 months.

Popular

Obama's visit comes as he is enjoying an increasing popularity among Iraqis.

"I support Obama. I think he is the best for Iraq and for the world," Mustafa Salah, an office worker in the southern city of Basra, told Reuters.

"If McCain wins I will be devastated."

Obama had voted against the 2003 US invasion of Iraq and made his opposition to the Iraq war a centerpiece of his election campaign.

Republican nominee John McCain, meanwhile, supported President George W. Bush's decision to invade Iraq.

"The face of America was spoilt by the Republicans and Bush. A McCain win means Bush stays," said Zainab Riyad, a teacher.

Hisham Fadhil, a doctor in northern Kirkuk, believes that Obama will change "the face of the Iraq war".

"He is much better than others because he is black and black people were tyrannized in America," said Fadhil.

"I think he will feel our suffering."

Iraqis, however, were divided over Obama's plans to withdraw US combat troops within 16 months if he wins office.

"When I was in the United States I found Democrats are more peaceful and avoid wars," Kamiran Mohammed, from Kirkuk, said.

Munadhil al-Mayyahi, an independent politician in Basra, disagrees.

"What Obama said about pulling out US forces is just for political gains. It is unrealistic," he said.

Many Iraqis, however, were dismissive of the US presidential election in general, more concerned with the struggle of daily life in Iraq.

"For the moment I'm thinking about getting enough electricity," said Abdul-Mahdi Hadi, a Basra teacher.

"I do not believe either candidate will change the situation in Iraq."
 
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #2 on: Oct 30, 2008 07:57 PM »

Watching America Vote: Palestinians anxious

By Lawahez Jabari, NBC News Producer

RAMALLAH, West Bank - With the U.S. election now just a few days away, Palestinians here have been fascinated by the race, not only because the system of primaries, conventions, and debates is so different compared to the way leaders are chosen here, but also because of the prospect that Americans could actually elect a person of color as their leader.

It's always been a given that the unflinching support for Israel by the U.S. helps give Israel leverage in its negotiations with the Palestinian Authority and that statements of support from the White House have always been the best indicator of that commitment. But, that's also why this year's election has been closely watched by the Palestinian media and by Palestinians in the streets of the West Bank, Gaza, and east Jerusalem.

 
VIDEO: Palestinians have low expectations for U.S. elections 


All of the people I spoke with in the West Bank are tantalized by the idea of a Barack Obama presidency. They see it not only as an historic moment for the U.S., but also as the possible breakthrough they've been waiting for in their own struggle for a state.

At the same time though, enthusiasm for an Obama presidency is tempered by the sobering facts on the ground. 

Political stalemate
Palestinians remain skeptical as ever about any future progress in relations with Israel for a number of reasons. Despite a pledge by President Bush to produce a peace framework leading to the creation of a Palestinian state by the end of his term, it's now widely accepted that this will be more unfinished business for the next administration to tackle.

After more than 20 trips by Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to this region, there has still been no tangible progress. In fact, according to the Palestinians, Israel has built more settlements, checkpoints, and roadblocks during this period, in defiance of U.S. requests to halt construction.

The reasons for the lack of a final plan reflect the weakness of leaders on both sides.

There was always a question mark over how far outgoing Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert could lead Israeli negotiations while facing allegations of corruption.

And now Olmert is powerless – he is acting in a caretaker capacity since resigning in September over a corruption scandal – and Israel is now distracted by the attempts of the new leader of the Kadima Party, Prime Minister-designate Tzipi Livni, to form a new government.

At the same time, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has been negotiating against a backdrop of not only a divided Palestinian society, but a divided Fatah movement, and he remains haunted by the end of his term, due in January 2009. Hamas, which controls Gaza, has already said it will appoint its own head of the Palestinian Authority when Abbas' term ends.

And statements by both Sen. John McCain and Obama during their campaigns vowing their support of Israel have confirmed Palestinians worst suspicions that the next administration will not be any different than the Bush White House.

‘They are all the same’
At the end of July, Barak Obama visited Israel and promised his "unshakeable commitment to the security" of the country, but he also visited the West Bank city of Ramallah and assured Abbas of his support for a two-state resolution as a way to eventually resolve the region’s problems. 

McCain also visited Israel during a weeklong trip through the Middle East and Europe in March and stood by the country’s efforts to defend itself. He also praised Abbas commitment to trying to reach a peace deal, but did not meet with the Palestinians.   

But, comments made by Obama were actually the most surprising for Palestinians, especially when he announced his support for a Jerusalem fully controlled by Israel – one of the main issues of dispute for a future Palestinian state. 

"The U.S. presidential election will do nothing to settle the Mideast problems; the comprehensive peace – that will never happen," said Jamal Hamdan, a 74-year-old who lives in Ramallah. "They are all the same. They all support Israel even more than the previous administration that is about to leave. The Zionist control the government of the United States."

‘It’s a challenge’
But, still, many Palestinians believe the 2008 election is critical and change the usual order of things.

"I think this election is going to be very, very important, because there are so many things hanging up over this election, between the two candidates. The gap is so wide and there are so many issues," said Fays Eid. "It affects so many people and so many lives, not just in the United States, but all over the world."

Many Palestinians have put their hope in Obama and believe he is actually different from other politicians.

"I wish Obama could win," said Mohammad Jarasy, a 56-year-old supermarket owner. "He is going to help the economy, he's going to help the peace process for everybody in the Middle East."

Others see the elections as an opportunity for a major turning point. "In fact it's a challenge," said Musa Ahmad, a 50-year-old Palestinian consultant for a German company in Dubai. "It looks like this is the first time in the U.S.A to elect somebody with a different color, different opinion, and I believe that he's believing in freedom and he's believing in peace and I think he will support the Palestinians."

While the Bush administration is still pursuing diplomatic efforts, Rice acknowledged at a recent speech in Washington before a Palestinian investment forum that time was running out to produce a peace plan, as proposed at the Annapolis conference in November 2007.   

"I will leave no stone unturned to see if we can finally resolve this conflict," she said. But Palestinians here are now looking to the next administration to deliver on that promise.

Lawahez Jabari is an NBC News Producer who is based out of NBC's Tel Aviv bureau.

blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #3 on: Oct 30, 2008 08:07 PM »

By NBC News’ Carol Grisanti and Fakhar ur Rehman

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan – For many Pakistanis, the battle for the White House raging in the U.S. is less about the differences between the two candidate’s qualifications to be president, and more about which of the two is more likely to stop sending missile-firing drone aircraft from across the border in Afghanistan into Pakistan’s tribal areas.

And in that regard, many Pakistanis are overwhelmingly in favor of Sen. Barack Obama.

Many believe that Obama will be a friend to Pakistan and change the Bush administration’s policy of "hot pursuit" of terrorists inside their borders.

 
VIDEO: Pakistanis differ over whether an Obama or McCain White House will be best


Even more surprisingly, more than a few of the Pakistanis we spoke with were convinced that Obama is Muslim because his middle name is "Hussein," and therefore believe he may be more sympathetic to Pakistan if he were president.

"Barack Obama is for Muslims," said Osman Ali, an 18-year-old high school student in Islamabad. "I am sure he will withdraw U.S. forces from our borders and that’s why I hope he will win."

Nazim Hussain, a medical student, echoed Ali. "Obama will not be like Bush," he said. "Bush had an aggressive policy towards Muslims and I’m sure that Obama will be different."

But if these Pakistanis had listened to the first presidential debate between the two candidates, they might have been surprised. Obama and Sen. John McCain were at odds over Pakistan – with McCain taking a softer stance.

Difference of approach
According to Obama, the U.S. has to deal with Pakistan in a tougher manner. Pakistan has received $10 billion in U.S. military aid and assistance and the Pakistanis have not done what needs to be done to get rid of the terrorist safe havens inside their borders.

"If the United States has al-Qaida, bin Laden, top-level lieutenants in our sights, and Pakistan is unable or unwilling to act, then we should take them out," Obama said during the first presidential debate on Sept. 26 when a question by moderator Jim Lehrer about Afghanistan lead to the issue of Pakistan. 


McCain said such threats were unhelpful. "We've got to get the support of the people of – of Pakistan," he said. He countered by stressing the need to work with the Pakistani people to help them get the border area under control.

"We're going to have to help the Pakistanis go into these areas and obtain the allegiance of the people. And it's going to be tough," he said. 

In spite of McCain’s call for a new strategy in dealing with Pakistan, Salima Agha, a savvy businesswoman in Islamabad, had no time for a McCain presidency.

"I’m for Obama," she said. "He’s young, he’s energetic and he represents change." She added, "He’s the JFK of the 21st century."


‘The U.S. policy will always be against us’
But Kulsoom Mirza, a mother of four who lives in an upscale Islamabad neighborhood, thought both candidates were highlighting strikes inside Pakistan as a way to win votes.

"Neither candidate will be good for Pakistan," she said. "God forbid that the U.S. will do to us what they have done to Afghanistan and Iraq. But it seems to me and to my family that the U.S. is intent upon destroying Pakistan as well," she said.

Mirza’s views seemed to have widespread support among Pakistanis from all walks of life.

Raja Khalid, a marketing manager in Rawalpindi, agreed when asked about his views on the U.S. presidential candidates.

"It is up to the American people to decide who will be their president, Pakistan has nothing to do with it," said Khalid. "But one thing I know for sure, the U.S. policy will always be against us –that will never change." He added, "We need to distance ourselves from America."

Others echoed Khalid’s sentiments and seem to see the U.S. as more of a menacing threat than an ally.


"The Americans are enemies of Muslims," said Muhammed Shabbir, who works in a laundry shop in Rawalpindi. "They do not wish us well; the Americans want to destroy us," he said.

Shabbir, who spoke in Urdu, the native language of Pakistan, grew impatient from the question as much as from the heat inside the small shop as he labored over a hot iron.

"Look," he told us, "The U.S. is responsible for all the terrorism taking place inside Pakistan today," he said, his voice becoming agitated. "The U.S. is the mastermind of all our problems because it wants to destroy Pakistan," he said.

Not mincing words, Agha, the business woman in Islamabad, said, "The U.S policy is just all wrong. The Bush administration’s policy is just all wrong."

"How could the U.S. expect to invade and occupy two Muslim countries and not expect repercussions," she said. "And now they see what they have sowed."

blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #4 on: Nov 01, 2008 02:10 AM »

A skeptical Mideast public awaits U.S. elections

What do Arabs and Muslims in the Middle East think of the U.S. candidates? Mideast experts and polls indicate mixed reviews of the two nominees.


By Souheila Al-Jadda

John McCain and Barack Obama have very different visions for what America needs over the next four years, and when it comes to foreign policy, the differences are quite stark. On Middle East policy, in particular, many of their positions are diametrically opposed.

Obama wants a phased withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq; McCain wants no timetables. Obama is open to direct diplomacy with such foes as Iran; McCain says preconditions would have to be met.

What do Arabs and Muslims in the Middle East think of the U.S. candidates? Mideast experts and polls, as well as interviews I've done through e-mail and in person during a recent trip to Syria, indicate mixed reviews of the two nominees but with an edge for Obama.

One thing is clear: Whoever wins will have a tough task. Not only must he work toward elevating America's standing in the Middle East, he must also demonstrate to an increasingly frustrated Arab public that his policies will be a real change from the past eight years.

Obama's statements about the Middle East and Muslims in general have been more tempered than McCain's. Fawaz Gerges, a professor of international affairs at New York's Sarah Lawrence College, echoed the sentiments of many Arabs when he told Saudi TV that Obama is "the only presidential candidate (who) talked about reconciliation with the Arab and Muslim worlds."

Obama's family background is also seen to give him an edge. Lebanese journalist Huda al Husseini recently wrote in Asharq Al-Awsat, a pan-Arabic newspaper, that Obama's family ties to Kenya and Indonesia highlight his "unique background and upbringing, which in turn gives him a distinctive outlook to the world that is markedly different from the mainstream."

Yet any American candidate, no matter the background or stump speeches, would have tough sledding in the region in the wake of unpopular wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. U.S. standing has suffered considerably.

The Pew Research Center recently reported that those polled in Egypt, for instance, showed slight confidence in either candidate: 31% for Obama and 23% for McCain. In Jordan, tepid support for McCain was 23%, just one point higher than Obama. Not exactly enthusiasm.

But Jordanian real estate agent Shada Mohammed told me she favors Obama because "he seems (more) neutral to the Arab world than McCain."

That's a common sentiment. Though McCain has more experience, he is perceived by those I interviewed as too aggressive and too closely linked with President Bush. Arabs have not forgotten his singing pledge, though made in jest, to "bomb, bomb, bomb" Iran. Nor have they forgotten his continued support for the Iraq war.

On the issue of terrorism, McCain's approach strikes Muslims as harsh. He uses buzzwords such as "Islamic terrorism" or "Islamic extremism." Continuing to link Islam with terrorism won't win hearts and minds in the region. Obama has been more sensitive to these concerns.

Former secretary of State Colin Powell, who recently endorsed Obama, articulated this point quite well. "What if he (Obama) is (Muslim)? Is there something wrong with being a Muslim in this country? The answer's no, that's not America," Powell said on Meet the Press. "Those kinds of images going out on Al-Jazeera are killing us around the world," he said after the show.

Most Arabs recognize that neither they nor Americans benefit from misunderstandings between the US and Middle East nations. Let's hope that the candidate who wins on Tuesday will recognize that as well.

-- Souheila Al-Jadda is associate producer of Mosaic: World News from the Middle East, on Link TV. She's also a member of USA TODAY's board of contributors.


blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #5 on: Nov 02, 2008 05:01 PM »

salaam

this is sort of a fun thing but I think its also really important. vote here and you will get the results of who the world wants. The US is the strongest power in the world, so it is important that the world like whos our president to keep good relations with everyone

www.iftheworldcouldvote.com
nuh
Guest
« Reply #6 on: Nov 03, 2008 01:38 PM »

As salaam alaikum.

It is times like these that I am happy to not be a citizen of the United States of America.

Both candidates have an aggressive, anti-islamic foreign policy.
Both candidates are pro-war.
Neither candidate is qualified to run a large business, never mind prudently manage the world's biggest economy.

Obama will continue the slaughter of children in the womb.
McCain offers little hope anything different then the status quo.

Anyone wanna buy me a ticket to Arabia? My vote goes to Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz Al Saud.

Ma'as salaama,
nuh
 bro
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #7 on: Nov 03, 2008 02:44 PM »

Walaikumsalaam

honestly Nuh the leaders around the world are not any better if not worse. The only reason US stands out more is because they have more money and power

I really beleive mcains anti-islamic foreign policy is alot worse. The republicans are already bombing pakistan. they just bombed syria. he was for the iraq war. while obama wrote a speech against it even though most people were for it that time. That took courage. Obama wants to continue the peace process in israel and palestine while mcain doesnt. I see a significant difference in the candidates

I totally beleive that mcain cant handle the economy, he hasnt been doing it for so many years hes been in washington. And obamas ideas arent all that gr8 (but better than mcains)  but we still need to give him a chance as
he hasnt been in washington long

obama will continue abortion, I assume  thats what you are saying. well u have to remember that even islamically there is a difference of opinion on this . its a broad subject. and obama has clearly said that the number of abortions are big and we really need to cut down that number. And remember who sais mcain will stop it? The republicans have been in the office for the last eight years. Abortion is still going on.

walahualim

I believe that most scholars say its our duty to pick the 'less evil' so I hope we can do that. And remember its always going to be a gamble..just like marriage.. you really dont know untill the person gets to office but does that mean you dont pick a man for marriage? Does that mean you dont marry? We still need to vote and use the brain that Allah swt gave us and try and take risks. Doing nothing is not going to change the world or improve it. I know that we are all scared but we all need to put our trust in Allah swt.
I trust that we can do that inshAllah

se7en
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 11
se7en has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 358



« Reply #8 on: Nov 03, 2008 03:07 PM »

salaam,

after watching the debates I've become pretty cynical of Obama... I think his presidency will not lead to any significant change for the better in foreign policy (except moving troops from Iraq to Afghanistan - targetting one nation of Muslim people instead of another Roll Eyes) and things will probably continue in the way they are right now in Washington...  *but* with McCain I'm scared that things will actually become even worse   Undecided
nuh
Guest
« Reply #9 on: Nov 03, 2008 03:13 PM »

As salaam alaikum.

I am sick and tired of political blow-hards from both sides pretending that their candidate is the one that can walk on water, raise the dead and usher in the day of judgement.

There is little real change, there is no substantive difference -- that is the miserable truth.

So pick the candidate that is the lesser evil, plug your nose and vote.

Alhamdulillah, our ummah is one.
nuh
 bro
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #10 on: Nov 03, 2008 03:40 PM »

Quote
salaam,

after watching the debates I've become pretty cynical of Obama... I think his presidency will not lead to any significant change for the better in foreign policy (except moving troops from Iraq to Afghanistan - targetting one nation of Muslim people instead of another ) and things will probably continue in the way they are right now in Washington...  *but* with McCain I'm scared that things will actually become even worse   


uhhhhhh im so upset I just wrote a long post and it got accidentallyerased:( Smiley
walaikumsalaam Seven I hope you and the baby are doing well! Well what I had written was that I did mention some significant differences btw the candidates above. Please do check out my other posts in the news section. Yes you are right in the debates Obama was outright vocal that he plans to go to afghan / pakistan .  But mcain agreed with him, he just said the public doesnt need to know that. Mcain has the exact same plan. he wants a surge of troops there also. except that with him he wants both wars running and God knows how many more since he likes to joke 'bomb bomb iran' so they want the exact same thing. you will find that if you look up their forein policy. Palin has also clearly said in an interview that we do not need pakistans permission to go there.

another  foreign policy diff I forgot to mention is that obama wants diplomacy (which is very imp) while mcain does not. obamas background helps him in foreign policy, plus the fact that the world is willing to negotiate with him just because they approve of him.

about pakistan again I doubt he will hurt or want to bomb bc after reading his books u know hes had friends there and even stays in contact with his mothers students there. who loved her and say they really believe obama wont do nething to hurt them. and u know the republicans are already killing civilians there. thats not what obama wants . he just want to get OBL and thas it. Alllahu alim.
chek out the 2 posts here: http://jannah.org/madina/index.php?topic=1724.

so yes you might be right, thing probably wont change with obama, and if they do it will take alot of time. And yes again I totally agree with you, I believe with mcain things will be alot worse. I think that if there come nother 9/11 which i hope never happens, we will probly be rounded up in camps with mcain presidency, but i dont think w obama presidency. remember mcain is known to be very angry even his friends say this. so its scary for a man to rule in anger. while obama has proven better character and temprament and judgement.

take care
blackrose

ps Nuh im sorry I dont understand why you are upset, I thought I did mention some significant differences. It is absolutely your choice whether you want to aknowledge them or ignore them.
nuh
Guest
« Reply #11 on: Nov 03, 2008 03:52 PM »

As salaam alaikum.

I am not angry or upset.

Just tired of the hype and marketing that has been pumped into two candidates that have made promises that they won't keep and the mindless yankee zombies that believe what the democrats and republicans are selling.

Hunter S. Thompson said:

"America... just a nation of two hundred million used car salesmen with all the money we need to buy guns and no qualms about killing anybody else in the world who tries to make us uncomfortable."


Sad and true!

Ma'as salaama,
nuh
 bro
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #12 on: Nov 03, 2008 03:58 PM »

wsalaam

sorry but what about the rest of the world , who will do anything to help america for money and power and even sell their own people and who have no care for human dignity
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #13 on: Nov 03, 2008 03:59 PM »

oh yah and thas right

everyone just lies, dont believe anyone just sit and complain right
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #14 on: Nov 03, 2008 05:12 PM »

Rest of world to U.S.: We have a stake, too
Verdict seen having big impact overseas as polls show huge global interest

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27455097
nuh
Guest
« Reply #15 on: Nov 03, 2008 05:54 PM »

As salaam alaikum.

"In a closed society where everybody's guilty, the only crime is getting caught. In a world of thieves, the only final sin is stupidity." (Hunter S Thompson)


everyone just lies, dont believe anyone just sit and complain right


I think that it is insensitive to make comments like this.

I am free to make comments, disagree and complain. Masha'Allah, who made the rule that if I don't agree with blackrose then I can't have an opinion!

Talk about political hypocrisy.

Freedom of speak just watch what you say....in the good old boy US of A.

Applies to Obama supporters -- too bad, it's sad but proves my initial point!

Your welcome,
nuh
 bro
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #16 on: Nov 03, 2008 06:11 PM »

salaam Nuh

Im sorry if I offended, I didnt mean to be sarcastic

but when u said "Just tired of the hype and marketing that has been pumped into two candidates that have made promises that they won't keep and the mindless yankee zombies that believe what the democrats and republicans are selling."

it seemed to me that you were implying this "everyone just lies, dont believe anyone just sit and complain right"

you say "Masha'Allah, who made the rule that if I don't agree with blackrose then I can't have an opinion!'"

I never said anything like that, looks like you are also being sarcastic...

Siham
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 23
Siham barely matters :(Siham barely matters :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 467


Ahla Haya


WWW
« Reply #17 on: Nov 04, 2008 05:20 PM »



"...Surely my prayer and my sacrifice, my life and my death are for Allah, the Lord of the Worlds..." (Qur'an, 6:162)
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #18 on: Nov 04, 2008 05:38 PM »

nice

reminds me of what my friend says

" Vote Barack for baraka!"Smiley
CountlessBlessings
Sis
Jr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 7
CountlessBlessings has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 94



« Reply #19 on: Nov 05, 2008 12:09 AM »

Seven I hope you and the baby are doing well!

Wait a minute!! When did this happen?? How did I miss this? 
Du'aas and congrats!!!!!!!!
JustOne
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 17
JustOne has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 543


« Reply #20 on: Nov 05, 2008 02:36 AM »

sorry on that note...

i don't think that america's volume of war is going to change much, no matter who wins.  north pakistan is being shelled on a daily basis, and i have heard interviews where journalists/academics believe that the al-qaeda war should be "taken to islamabad".  and yeah, that actually effects me (and most muslims) more immediately than his decision to pull out of iraq (since he would never do that immediately).

i do think obama is the lesser of 2 evils, if you will - for his level of intelligence and integrity alone, not for his views on foreign policy OR domestic policy, for that matter.
JustOne
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 17
JustOne has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 543


« Reply #21 on: Nov 05, 2008 02:41 AM »

p.s.  if the americans voted mccain in, they would take on his foreign policy alongside with it.  in other words, they would expect that he would continue fighting the war on terror... and even if he effectively pulled out of iraq everyone would say "good job".  with obama, once he comes into office, he has to prove that he is willing to fight the war on terror, because no one (not even his supporters) really believe he's up to it.  therefore, in order to prove that to americans and his critics, he may end up doing more damage.

this isn't a new phenomenon...it's happened before. 

think about it.  and i agree, he's a great person... but he doesn't walk on water.
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7133


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #22 on: Nov 05, 2008 03:20 AM »

ws,

this is soo nerve racking!! i went out to vote about 6pm and thank goodness it wasn't too crowded at my polling station. it's been exciting so far. i don't trust any US politicians but everyone must admit to have a different president will bring some change, let's just pray it's good change. ameen!

!!
watching jazeera, abc, nbc, cbs, pbs simultaneously!!
BrKhalid
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 27
BrKhalid barely matters :(BrKhalid barely matters :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 1352



« Reply #23 on: Nov 05, 2008 04:22 AM »

Asalaamu Alaikum  bro

Well all the websites seem to show Obama is going to be the winner.

It's now a question of wait and see......



Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #24 on: Nov 05, 2008 04:35 AM »

salaam

he won .. wohooo!

last year I thought something like this could never happen. I only dreamed bad things for the muslims.. especially after people were saying halliburton is making camps for the muslims

Im glad Obama came and Im glad he won. I have 'hope' once again and am proud to be American. People were saying he could never do , that they wouldnt allow it to happen. that its not possible. that they are playing games. well he did. we did. and I have trust in our system now.

Whether you were for him or not let s all make dua that the future is better for everyone.

At the same note I have to say I really liked John Mccains speech. first time he made me cry.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: