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Author Topic: Makkah of Old: Old Lithographs, Photographs & Paintings  (Read 2816 times)
jannah
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« on: Oct 28, 2008 09:21 AM »


salam,

I think the archives still have the pictures from Makkah and Madinah way back when. Especially those flood pictures are amazing! Here's some audio with old pictures of an adhan from 1952. So nostalgic. I wish we could somehow preserve everything the way it was, but progress. Even someone's Hajj ten years ago is probably historical now.

! Private video
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Shahida
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« Reply #1 on: Dec 08, 2008 11:55 AM »

salam

I got these from a friend of mine...sub7anAllah! Smiley  1953!!!

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Shahida
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« Reply #2 on: Dec 08, 2008 11:58 AM »

more...
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jannah
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« Reply #3 on: Dec 09, 2008 10:30 AM »

wsalaam,

Amazing SubhanAllah. These are from the 1953 issue of National Geographic I believe. I guess even our own pictures from a year ago will be historic in a few years after they demolish everything and rebuild for 3 million!!

ws

sigh hope we all get to go again inshaAllah ameen.

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rahma
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« Reply #4 on: Dec 09, 2008 10:37 AM »

Doesn't look near as crowded as it does nowadays.  Is there anyway to find out the total # of pilgrims for each past year?  Would be interesting to find out.
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jannah
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« Reply #5 on: Sep 28, 2011 04:19 PM »

Found this very interesting gallery of old pictures circa 1885

Snouck Hurgronje’s early photographs 1885

http://www.theemptyquarter.com/index.php?p=view_exhibit&ex_name=TWVjY2E6IEEgZGFuZ2Vyb3VzIEFkdmVudHVyZSCWIFNub3VjayBIdXJncm9uamWScyBlYXJseSBwaG90b2dyYXBocyAxODg1#ph
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jannah
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« Reply #6 on: Nov 01, 2011 04:04 PM »

The 1904 one's are from A Photographer on the Hajj, The Travels of Muhammad ‘Ali Effendi Sa’udi (1904/1908)

The 1885 one's are from Snouk but interestingly enough there is evidence that he never actually took these photographs. that they were taken by an Arab named Al-Sayyid Abd al-Ghaffar, who is considered the earliest Arabian photographer of Mecca.


Al-Sayyid Abd al-Ghaffar, the earliest Arabian photographer of Mecca.

http://www.theemptyquarter.com/newsletters/snouck-newsletter.html

For years no one questioned the authorship of Christiaan Snouck Hurgronje as the maker of his famous Photographs from Mecca, an album he published under his own name. It wasn't until 1981 that Al-Sayyid Abd al-Ghaffar, a physician (and eye doctor?) from Mecca, was re-identified as the original photographer. Painstaking scientific research has brought his achievements to the forefront again, recognizing him as most certainly the first Meccan photographer, thus allowing Arsalan Mohammad to write about al-Ghaffar in an article for The National:

»To the faithful, making their annual Haj pilgrimages in 1887 from all points across the world, the sight must have been perplexing, to say the least. To Al Sayyid Abd al Ghaffar, who had struggled across the desert with a convoy of camels bearing boxes of photography equipment to point his cumbersome, primitive camera across the plains of Mount Arafat at a sea of small tents, exhausted camels and thousands of travellers, it must have been stranger, more fantastical and rewarding than he could ever have imagined.«

»What Ghaffar saw that day in 1887 as he joined the caravans of pilgrims arriving by the thousand onto the plains below Mount Arafat was recorded for posterity in a series of photographic prints. Unable to contain the panoramic view within his lens, he moved the contraption about, loading up heavy glass plates into the camera as well as trying to process the freshly exposed negatives in a portable darkroom tent. Other images show pilgrims camping at the tomb of Sittana Maimunah and of the Ka'aba itself, taken from aerial perspectives, showing the crowds moving around the courtyard.«

»Compared to familiar modern-day images showing millions under electric lights, these sepia pictures are truly breathtaking. When pieced together, this series of images gives a vision of humanity and of the pilgrims who spent months travelling through the desert to reach Mecca in time for the Haj. The results became the very first photographs taken in Mecca by an Arab photographer.«
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