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Author Topic: How do you feel about the election '08 results?  (Read 4073 times)
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timbuktu
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« on: Nov 05, 2008 06:30 AM »


peace be upon you

good. I congratulate Obama and all who supported him for the President of the US of A.

What does it mean for those of us on this planet who are non-US people.

For there are an awful lot of us.

What does it mean for the Muslim people against whom the mighty US of A has been waging wars.

For again, we are an awful lot in numbers.

Iraq, Afghanistan, Palestine, Pakistan, where the US or its ally Israel is bombing and killing ordinary people.

Will Obama compensate the Iraqis for the destruction of their lives? The four million displaced ones, who have left homes because of the infighting brought on by the war on Iraq.

He cannot bring back the more than 1.2 million Iraqis killed as a result of this war, but will he apologise, and compensate the Iraqis.

We are an awful lot of people, and we have been living under occupation of those we do not like: in Chechnya, Kashmir, Mindanao, Pattani, ... and many more places.

Will Obama also label us terrorists for our independence struggles?

Where we are nominally independent, we live under autocratic or corrupt rule - the fruits of corruption going to foreign companies, consultants, and the rulers, who deposit their ill-gotten wealth in the West's money-laundering havens, foremost among these being the US of A.

What is Obama going to do about it? Or is he going to do nothing?

That is what concerns me. What wonderful lives the people of the mighty US of A will enjoy, doesn't matter much to me, except to wish them happiness.

Is Obama listening? Will he stop the money laundering, the deposition of our wealth in the names of the corrupt? Will he return our stolen wealth to us, or will he use it to finance the credit crunch of capitalism?

Is he listening?
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« Reply #1 on: Nov 05, 2008 07:34 AM »

salaam

awesome post. you sound like counterpunch.org

to be honest I doubt much is going to change, I doubt obama will be any sort of savior. .. but i have high hopes that he will try to move thing in a more postive direction  than they were..

one thing is that Ive heard hes got a good ear so I do hope he is listening.

an interesting article from www.counterpunch.org

A New World?
http://www.counterpunch.org/ridgeway11042008.html
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« Reply #2 on: Nov 05, 2008 07:49 AM »

At the very least, his intelligence, grace, composure, outreach - both national and international, resilience, and humility is a comforting change I very much look forward to.  In his victory speech, he did mention that he is listening (to people who's vote he did not earn tonight).  He also mentioned the people around the world who are huddled over radios listening to election coverage -- I am sure that he has judged this image accurately, and even if he isn't "listening" to the world, the fact that he even acknowledges its existence, is commendable.

There is A LOT to be said about a leader that inspires hope over fear, and that achieves that position by overcoming every barrier in the book. 

 
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« Reply #3 on: Nov 05, 2008 08:03 AM »

Asking how Muslims in the US or in other countries (and others) feel about this? What do you fear or hope for the future?
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« Reply #4 on: Nov 05, 2008 09:32 AM »

salam

Everyone here is delighted by the results....

I don't think this much interest/hope has ever been raised in overseas elections before!




Wassalaam

And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186
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« Reply #5 on: Nov 05, 2008 12:42 PM »

As salaamu alaikum

Indeed this is historic; the first visibly African-American/Black elected as President of the United States  Although let's call Obama what he is - bi-racial.

Considering however that bigotry is alive and well in the US and globally I fear for Obama's safety and I fear that those at the lower levels who have direct control and impact on the lives of others will make things even more difficult for non-Whites.  I fear that Obama will take the path of so many other Blacks in power positions and fail to effect positive change for Blacks while doing so for other people of color and for Whites.  I fear that conditions for Muslims will not improve because Islamophobic ideals have permeated society and are acceptable today.  The continued challenges to Affirmative Action will continue (driven by a Black man who benefitted from these same policies and laws he wants to eliminate).

Still history was made and that speaks volumes globally.  Now all we need in the next 4 years is to elect the country's first female president (and not Sarah Palin).

Fa'izah
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« Reply #6 on: Nov 05, 2008 03:51 PM »

As salaam alaikum.

This result is the lesser of two evils and in light of that the result good for America.

Now it's time for Obama to live up to his own hype.

Ma'as salaama,
nuh
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« Reply #7 on: Nov 05, 2008 06:05 PM »

WOW last nite was a defining moment and a historic night, President Elect Barack Hussein Obama!!!
Masha`Allah his speech was powerful, it made me cry.

Obama, is a man of integrity and he is smart! so hopefully he'll deal with the Muslim world with dignity.

Indeed, yes we can .... Yes we did:)

 bebzi

"Do not treat people with contempt, nor walk insolently on the earth. Allah does not love the arrogant or the self-conceited boaster. Be modest in your bearing and subdue your voice, for the most unpleasant of voices is the braying of the ass." [The Holy Qur'an, Surah Luqman - 31:18-19]
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« Reply #8 on: Nov 05, 2008 11:41 PM »

salam

From a historical and social perspective, I never thought something like this would ever happen, especially in my lifetime, but it did! It speaks volumes about the realm of possibility that exists in the USA, though people shouldn't go overboard and think that the inequities, racial and otherwise, have magically been removed.

From a Muslim perspective, again, he's perceived to be the lesser of the two evils, and inshallah it will get less worse now. Now that he's won, I'd like to hear what he really thinks (and does) about Muslim related issues...

From my usual pessimistic perspective, he is facing the most difficult job an incoming president has ever faced, and it will be exceedingly difficult for him to do well. I wouldn't be surprised if he and the Dems lose in 2012 because it will be tough to get out of this mess...


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« Reply #9 on: Nov 06, 2008 02:10 AM »

salaam

when I saw over 70 new mails in my inbox I was shocked, I thought maybe everyone wrote to congratulate me lol;)
but It turned out it was all the posts that were moved into 'election 2008' Its gr8, Im glad you did that Jannah! Its def more organized and those who dont want 2 c dont hve to come to this section!

I see that you merged alot of my posts into one. I couldnt find 'guantanamo lawyers endorse obama?"

For those of you who want to get to know more about your president (or the US president)  you can search through articles in this section.

Well I wrote some stuff when I found out he won in the 'if the world could vote' section.

The thing is that I realized is that when I found out he won , I did not feel 'extremely happy' but more what I felt was immense releif.
After studying john mccains policies and what he voted for and watching the campain as others I knew that Obamas words werent false , we would definately be getting more of the same, if not worse.

My hope is that Obama frees those who are tortured and gives them justice.

my hope is that eight yrs later obama forgets about revenge, (enough damage has been done) but focuses on building brides and healing the pain and huge amounts of diplomacy ofcourse . Diplomacy is very important.  Mcain did not want it. But experts say that its time to talk , not only to Iran but also to the taliban.

One thing is that Obama winning has brought trust and hope back into the world. And the fact that the americans got the president they really wanted speaks volumes about America and it really made me proud to be american.
It makes me want to say what Michelle obama was so much criticized for sayiing, 'for the first time in my adult life Im really proud to be american' (ofcourse much of the media left the 'really' part out. )

Another thing that is really important is that I hope Obama realizes and appreciate  that thousands of American Muslims have helped him get elected. Yes people still seemed to beleive he was Muslim so his mostly ignoring our community is understandable but I do hope he doesnt feel like he has to do it while he president also, and be afraid that people might say 'told you so ' ' hes muslim' or hes a sympathizer of muslim'  just like palin said to him that hes a sympathizer of 'terrorists' while obama rightfully fired back that we have to put the person on fair trial first to see if they are really terrorists. I loved the fact that he acknowledged that there may be many innocents getting tortured. That is definately commendable.
Since then, however, the Obama campaign has gone silent on executive power and the administration’s war crimes, and Senator Obama has only spoken out publicly on one occasion in September, in response to a ludicrous assertion by Sarah Palin, at the Republican conference, that “Al-Qaeda terrorists still plot to inflict catastrophic harm on America and he’s worried that someone won’t read them their rights.”

Senator Obama responded by telling supporters in Michigan that habeas corpus was “the foundation of Anglo-American law,” which “says very simply: If the government grabs you, then you have the right to at least ask, ‘Why was I grabbed?’ And say, ‘Maybe you’ve got the wrong person.’” He explained that it was an essential safeguard, “because we don’t always have the right person. We may think it’s Mohammed the terrorist, but it might be Mohammed the cab driver. You might think it’s Barack the bomb-thrower, but it might be Barack the guy running for president.”

The link to the whole article is: http://www.andyworthington.co.uk/2008/11/03/silence-on-war-crimes-as-the-us-election-campaign-ends/

And I hope Obama realizes that not only americans but the whole world has invested hope in him

As brother Nuh said 'its time for Obama to live up to his hype' and lets help him as we did before.
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« Reply #10 on: Nov 06, 2008 03:00 AM »

ws,

I'm not one to trust politicians. Don't think I ever will. But I do know there are fundamental differences between people and their philosophies of government, so I hope this will bring real change inshaAllah. I am also happy that people feel hope for the first time in a long time. And I know this is a big blow to Islamophobia, ironically those that built up the whole "obama is a muslim terrorist" thing will now pay for it now. Well guess what, a muslim terrorist is now the president of the united states!

=========================

Thoughts from Imam Suhaib Webb & Zaid Shakir:

Joys, Hopes and Aspirations
from Suhaib Webb by Suhaib Webb

Asalamu alaykum,

I would like to congratulate Sen. Obama, his campaign and the American people on this year’s election. I was nearly moved to tears by the large showing of people racing to lend their voices for change, the three hour lines and the commitment to values that brought us beyond the simplistic nature of color, faith and race. I was especially moved by the following quote:

“I heard that he won and I instinctively came here,” said Hollis Gentry, 45, who lives about six blocks away. “I came down here to make a prayer… that we’ll be able to change the nation and the world.”

While we are excited about an Obama presidency, we must never forget that our trust, hopes and ambitions rest solely with Allah. The worst thing we can do is to idolize Obama. This would undermine our unique ability to call him to account on issues and examine him with a critical eye and, at the same time, afford him the elastic to error and grow.

While many of us feel he is an excellent choice, we must never forget that until America is able to export the values it exposes to others, declare a war on the causes of poverty, offer universal health care, quality education and address its ethical lapses, we will continue to be seen by many as hypocrites.

We ask Allah to guide Obama to what pleases Allah, bless our country, bring justice to the oppressed and use us for goodness.

Suhaib


Yes We Can!
from Notes: New Islamic Directions by Imam Zaid

The American people have spoken in a resounding voice, “YES WE CAN!” and with that refrain echoing into the night history was made as Senator Barack Hussein Obama was elected to serve as the next president of the United States. Senator Obama’s election as the first African American president illustrates that the politics of hope can trump the politics of fear, that every vote can and does count, that the youth of this nation are not a group of apathetic hedonists, and that the promise of peace is stronger than the prospect of war.

Americans turned out in record numbers to sweep the Republicans out of office and at the end of the day more votes had been cast for Senator Obama than for any other presidential candidate in the history of this country. Senator Obama’s resounding victory will not change America overnight. African American and Latino youth will continue to be carted off to jails and prisons in numbers tremendously disproportionate to their percentage in the overall population, people whose homes are on the verge of foreclosure will find little immediate relief from the president-elect and his yet to be assembled team, and the war profiteers will continue to make money hand over fist as the misadventures in both Iraq and Afghanistan drag on.

However, the coalition of forces that has come together to guarantee Senator Obama’s victory represents a powerful realignment in American politics; young people of all ages and races (the hip hop generation), a re-energized African American electorate, progressive Latinos, particularly in Florida and the Southwest of the country, and Muslims, yes Muslims, many of whom worked just as doggedly as Senator Obama’s other supporters, despite the stigmatizing of their faith and themselves in many instances.

It is the promise that this new coalition represents as much as the inspiring leadership of Senator Obama that in the long run will translate the prospect of change that drove so many during the long electoral campaign into the reality of change. The heavy lifting that will be required to make the sacrifices necessary to usher in a new day in American society will be undertaken, on the ground, by members of this coalition. The continued mobilization of the members of the communities that this coalition represents will be critical to the implementation of Senator Obama’s agenda. At the end of the day, for those who would take note, Senator Obama’s election demonstrates once again the truth of the old adage, “All politics are local.”

Senator Obama’s election also opens a new door for Muslims in America. Although his campaign wisely distanced itself from any overt public identification with Muslims, considering the reality of the negative public perception of Islam and Muslims in some quarters, it is quite clear that Senator Obama valued the support he received from the Muslim community. He appointed a liaison to the Muslim community, high ranking members of his team met with Muslim delegations, and his campaign was supportive of Muslim grassroots efforts such as “Muslims for Obama.”

The fact that Senator Obama was able to win such a resounding victory, despite the fact that his middle name is Hussein, and despite the fact that there was a concerted and well-funded effort undertaken via both the internet, and the “Obsession” propaganda campaign to smear him as a Muslim, indicates that the majority of the American people are prepared to judge people on their merits and to look beyond the scare-tactics that proved so fruitful for the Republicans throughout the post-9/11 era.

The nature of Senator Obama’s victory opens up a tremendous door of opportunity for Muslims. Now is the time for us to unify our ranks and to take advantage of the spirit of change that has dominated this electoral season to work for meaningful change in the policies of this country towards both the Muslim world and the developing world in general. If we can organize our community, harness the creative power and intellect of our youth, end the historical tendency of our community to shy away from public service, and create a viable agenda that moves away from the zero-sum, seemingly escapist political ranting that so many of us have inclined towards in the past, then perhaps we will begin as American Muslims to make our own history, in a constructive way, as opposed to sitting passively on the sidelines as others make their history and create painful facts that are so detrimental to our interests and the lives of our coreligionists and other oppressed people both here and abroad. 
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« Reply #11 on: Nov 06, 2008 04:31 AM »

Asalamualaikum

This is by the sheikh as he 'tells us not to be guilty of hope'

By Sh. Yasir Qadhi


Indeed, all praise is due to Allah, and may peace and salutations be upon the prophets of Allah.

When the Muslims were in Makkah, there was a major war raging in a nearby land; a war that was, relative to its time, of cataclysmic proportion. It was being fought out between the only two super-powers of the era. And even though the Muslims themselves had nothing at stake in that war, even though any win or loss to either side would cause no immediate change in their lives, the Muslims were emotionally attached to one side against the other. Their spirits, their hopes, their optimism, all centered on the army of Heraclius, the emperor of Rome, as he fought against Kusrau Parvev, the King of Sassanid Persia. These early Muslims felt an affinity for the Christian Heraclius as he fought against the fire-worshiping Zoroastrians. So, when the news came that Heraclius had been defeated, the Muslims were in fact dejected, and the pagans of Makkah boasted to the Muslims that their ‘team’ had lost. It was at this occasion that Allah revealed the first few verses of Surah al-Rum, which gave them the optimistic prophecy that even though Heraclius had lost this battle, he would win a future one, in a few years. Many years later, the Prophet wrote a letter to Heraclius, and Heraclius heard the message of Islam. While respectful of it, he did not convert. Throughout this entire time, the Muslims were not reproached or reprimanded for their feelings of hope towards Heraclius and the Roman Empire.

How much more so, then, are we deserving of feeling hope and optimism, when a candidate who WILL directly affect our lives and the lives of millions of people across the world has been elected. For those who wish to make Muslims even feel guilty for this hope, I say that our religion is a religion of optimism and a religion of reality. We should feel optimistic, at all times, and take the best from every situation. And between the two candidates that were running for the highest office in the most powerful country in the world today, it was clear in the eyes of many, which of these two was more inclined to peace, and which was more inclined to war. It was clear who was able to inspire with hope and optimism, and who was more inclined to inspire through fear and hatred of ‘the other’. It was clear who had more intelligence and common sense, and who could not even think clearly enough to choose a qualified running mate.

Make no mistake about it, though. Barack Obama is no messiah, and, as an American political leader, he will inevitably do things that will enrage people around the world, and yes, sometimes even us. But looking at the alternative, in my opinion and the opinion of many in the know, the message was clear: he was the better candidate overall, at this time and place, for Muslims, for America, for the world. And if it so turns out that those who voted for Barack Obama were wrong, well, they can say, in full conscience and with no fear of reprimand, ‘O Allah, this is what was apparent to us when we chose, and only You knew the future and what it held.’

Indeed, we thank Allah who will judge us for the sincerity of our intentions rather than the unintended consequences of our actions.

It is indeed an historic moment for this country, when a black leader, with the middle name of Hussein, the son of an African visitor to this land, raised far away from the bastions of political power, can actually win the highest office. It is an historic moment, and I am proud to have witnessed it. But the election yesterday was not about supporting the persona of Barack Obama as much as it was about the scathing indictment of the previous administration. When people voted yesterday, they voted not for Barack, but against the current administration. Obama did not win because he was Obama, but rather because he was for change. And to me, that is huge reason to be optimistic about this country.

There is much good in America, and we need to channel that good and help it overcome the bad. Keep in mind that while Obama won a resounding victory in the electoral votes, he only had a slight lead in the popular vote (52% to Obama, 46 % to McCain). And while it is overly simplistic and wrong to claim that all those who voted for McCain were supportive of the current administration’s policies, it is not an exaggeration to state that a fairly large percentage of them would be averse to the positive vision of change that Obama claims to want. And that is a scary thought, one that sobers us up the reality, and shows us that there is a lot of work to do ahead.

As an American, I cannot help but feel a sense of joy, a sense of optimism for the future, and the work ahead for all of us. And as a Muslim, I sincerely pray that Allah wants good for this country, and that He places people in power that will bring about that good through them, and through all of us. The Obama campaign might have stopped now, but our campaign as Muslims, in spreading the truth and calling for justice, never stops as long as we remain in this world.

In this moment of elated happiness, when the nation itself seems swept away with the raw emotion of victory, let us remember that true victory is one’s spiritual victory in winning the pleasure of Allah. Let us keep in mind that leaders come and go, nations rise and fall, and one day, after having witnessed much happiness and sorrow, we too shall depart, leaving this world with only our deeds to show.

May Allah make us all beacons of light, calling people to the truth, and being a shining example for others to follow.

Yasir Qadhi
New Haven, CT
Nov 5th, 2008

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« Reply #12 on: Nov 06, 2008 11:20 PM »

Assalamualaikum

I don't think it makes much of a difference to be honest. Although, I suppose Obama is the lesser evil so to speak. One can only hope.

Wassalam

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« Reply #13 on: Nov 07, 2008 03:32 AM »

Asking how Muslims in the US or in other countries (and others) feel about this? What do you fear or hope for the future?
TO BE 100% Truthful?
Both fearful and hopeful.
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« Reply #14 on: Nov 09, 2008 05:12 PM »

As-salaamu alaykum wa rahmatullah,

I felt ecstatic: never felt more excited about pulling that lever on Tuesday or caring as much about the results. I think it has more to do with the historic-ness of this particular election, and I would have felt it if Barak Obama had no assocations with Muslims at all in his entire life. Strangely, I would have felt even more elated if he didn't have that family history.

I felt anxious: he will, and already has, overcompensated for his Muslim associations (like it or not, we live in a country that is fearful of Islam, and regardless of his religion, his father and step-father were Muslims. Has there ever been a president with such associations?). I don't know how long he'll keep that up, but I'm hoping and praying not for too long.

My husband is secretly hoping he'll "come out of the closet" for once and for all and say he really is a Muslim, and we can all call him President Hussain.

 Cheesy Grin Roll Eyes

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« Reply #15 on: Nov 09, 2008 07:22 PM »

salam

From a historical and social perspective, I never thought something like this would ever happen, especially in my lifetime, but it did! It speaks volumes about the realm of possibility that exists in the USA, though people shouldn't go overboard and think that the inequities, racial and otherwise, have magically been removed.

From a Muslim perspective, again, he's perceived to be the lesser of the two evils, and inshallah it will get less worse now. Now that he's won, I'd like to hear what he really thinks (and does) about Muslim related issues...

From my usual pessimistic perspective, he is facing the most difficult job an incoming president has ever faced, and it will be exceedingly difficult for him to do well. I wouldn't be surprised if he and the Dems lose in 2012 because it will be tough to get out of this mess...


I was thinking the same thing. He does have an incredibly difficult road ahead of him but I am hopeful that things can change for the better through his ideas and the will of Allah. I also agree with Faizah  when she said that she feared for his safety Ive been fearing for his safety as well. I hope he can make it through his term without being harmed and I wish him well in the difficult road he has ahead and I must say I was a bit sad that his grandmother did not live to see her grandson win this historic election but that was allahs will.
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« Reply #16 on: Nov 09, 2008 09:24 PM »

I just hope Obama is all he leads us to believe he is.
I'm worried and hopeful and think all of us should be praying for him
that Allah will give him the strength and wisdom he'll need to do a job that
he has much clean up to do and so many issues to attend to.
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« Reply #17 on: Nov 10, 2008 11:14 AM »

this may sound utterly stupid, but i can't help but feel he is God's gift to humanity.  i know it is stupid.  but why else do my eyes well up with tears when i think of him?

ok, he is not a muslim (although his every action seems muslim like), but for so many of us he is like a hero; he is also in a more mundane sense a vindication of the hyphenated muslim. 

everybody tries to label him as black or whatever.  these are very narrow labels, if only because he is black, yet white also, and brown, and thus everything in between.  but what he really is though, is Kenyan-American, a hyphenated American. when i grew up in the States, i always felt a little left because I never felt american enough because i had this other part of my identity.  well now the president of the United States also has this "other" part of his identity too.

how cool is that!

assalamualaikum

 
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« Reply #18 on: Nov 22, 2008 06:34 AM »

wsalam,

I wonder if anyone's feelings have changed over the latest nominations he's made. It sure will be interesting to see Hillary Clinton as Secretary of State  Shocked Shocked
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« Reply #19 on: Nov 22, 2008 08:50 PM »

wsalam,

I wonder if anyone's feelings have changed over the latest nominations he's made. It sure will be interesting to see Hillary Clinton as Secretary of State  Shocked Shocked

Can you say YUK!!!
I am so not a Hillary fan Tongue
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