// [Film Review] Slumdog Millionaire
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« on: Nov 14, 2008 10:33 AM »


Sounds awesome, I want to see it!

====================

Slumdog Millionaire

/ / / November 11, 2008


Cast & Credits
Jamal Malik (older) Dev Patel
Latika (older) Freida Pinto
Salim Malik (older) Madhur Mittal
Prem Anil Kapoor
Inspector Irrfan Khan
Jamal (middle) Tanay Hemant Chheda
Latika (middle) Tanvi Ganesh Lonkar
Salim (middle) Ashutosh Lobo Gajiwala
Jamal (youngest) Ayush Mahesh Khedekar
Latika (youngest) Rubina Ali
Salim (youngest) Azharuddin Mohammed Ismail

Fox Searchlight presents a film directed by Danny Boyle. Screenplay by Simon Beaufoy, based on the novel Q&A by Vikas Swarup. In English with Hindi dialogue. Running time: 116 minutes. Rated R (for some violence, disturbing images and language).


Danny Boyle's "Slumdog Millionaire" hits the ground running. This is a breathless, exciting story, heartbreaking and exhilarating at the same time, about a Mumbai orphan who rises from rags to riches on the strength of his lively intelligence. The film's universal appeal will present the real India to millions of moviegoers for the first time.

The real India, supercharged with a plot as reliable and eternal as the hills. The film's surface is so dazzling that you hardly realize how traditional it is underneath. But it's the buried structure that pulls us through the story like a big engine on a short train.

By the real India, I don't mean an unblinking documentary like Louis Malle's "Calcutta" or the recent "Born Into Brothels." I mean the real India of social levels that seem to be separated by centuries. What do people think of when they think of India? On the one hand, Mother Teresa, "Salaam Bombay!" and the wretched of the earth. On the other, the "Masterpiece Theater"-style images of "A Passage to India," "Gandhi" and "The Jewel in the Crown."

The India of Mother Teresa still exists. Because it is side-by-side with the new India, it is easily seen. People living in the streets. A woman crawling from a cardboard box. Men bathing at a fire hydrant. Men relieving themselves by the roadside. You stand on one side of the Hooghly River, a branch of the Ganges that runs through Kolkuta, and your friend tells you, "On the other bank millions of people live without a single sewer line."

On the other hand, the world's largest middle class, mostly lower-middle, but all the more admirable. The India of "Monsoon Wedding." Millionaires. Mercedes-Benzes and Audis. Traffic like Demo Derby. Luxury condos. Exploding education. A booming computer segment. A fountain of medical professionals. Some of the most exciting modern English literature. A Bollywood to rival Hollywood.


As he approaches 20, Jamal (Dev Patel) rediscovers his childhood friend Latika (Freida Pinto), but they are star-crossed.

(Enlarge Image)
"Slumdog Millionaire" bridges these two Indias by cutting between a world of poverty and the Indian version of "Who Wants to be a Millionaire." It tells the story of an orphan from the slums of Mumbai who is born into a brutal existence. A petty thief, impostor and survivor, mired in dire poverty, he improvises his way up through the world and remembers everything he has learned.

His name is Jamel (played as a teenager by Dev Patel). He is Oliver Twist. High-spirited and defiant in the worst of times, he survives. He scrapes out a living at the Taj Mahal, which he did not know about but discovers by being thrown off a train. He pretends to be a guide, invents "facts" out of thin air, advises tourists to remove their shoes and then steals them. He finds a bit part in the Mumbai underworld, and even falls in idealized romantic love, that most elusive of conditions for a slumdog.

His life until he's 20 is told in flashbacks intercut with his appearance as a quiz show contestant. Pitched as a slumdog, he supplies the correct answer to question after question and becomes a national hero. The flashbacks show why he knows the answers. He doesn't volunteer this information. It is beaten out of him by the show's security staff. They are sure he must be cheating.

The film uses dazzling cinematography, breathless editing, driving music and headlong momentum to explode with narrative force, stirring in a romance at the same time. For Danny Boyle, it is a personal triumph. He combines the suspense of a game show with the vision and energy of "City of God" and never stops sprinting.

When I saw "Slumdog Millionaire" at Toronto, I was witnessing a phenomenon: dramatic proof that a movie is about how it tells itself. I walked out of the theater and flatly predicted it would win the Audience Award. Seven days later, it did. And that it could land a best picture Oscar nomination. We will see. It is one of those miraculous entertainments that achieves its immediate goals and keeps climbing toward a higher summit.
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« Reply #1 on: Dec 03, 2008 02:22 PM »

Slumdog sweeps UK film awards

By Malaika Mehta
Wed, Dec 03, 2008 01:55 IST

Slumdog Millionaire an English movie set in Mumbai and based around the harrowing life of a teenage boy who wins millions on “Kaun Banega Crorepati” has become the ‘buzz’ film of this season.

Last night added to the long list of accolades awarded to “Slumdog Millionaire” when it won three awards at the British Independent Film Awards (BIFAs).

What began as a low budget film, which was once destined to go straight to DVD in North America has won countless awards in that region and has now conquered the UK too; winning awards in the categories of Best British Independent Film, Best Director (Danny Boyle) and Most Promising Newcomer ( Dev Patel ).

Slumdog Millionaire which is not due to be released in the UK until January 9 has become a ‘must see’ with everybody talking about the film which is based on the award winning novel “Q&A” penned by Vikas Swarup.

Danny Boyle, the 52-year-old London-based director of such films such as Trainspotting, The Beach and 28 Days Later is now being talked of as a serious Oscar contender with Dev Patel also in the mix.

The film originally opened to a rapturous reception at the Telluride and Toronto International Film Festivals, the latter awarding "Slumdog Millionaire" its top audience prize. The Chicago International Film Festival then gave "Slumdog" another audience award and suddenly this ‘underdog’ tale with a dearth of Western box office stars and a third of its dialogue in Hindi (with subtitles) was destined for great things just like its main protagonist “Jamal Malik” a child of the Mumbai slums.

Danny Boyle paid tribute to Mumbai after winning the awards, his comments coming in light of the recent terror attacks on India’s vibrant city that have shaken the whole world.

"It's a city with a big heart that's been wounded this week, but it will recover," Boyle told the BBC.

He added: "It is weird to win this at the end of what's been a terrible week," referring to the attacks that killed 172 and injured countless others.

"But the human spirit is dominant. They will overcome, you can bet on it."

http://www.apunkachoice.com/scoop/bollywood/slumdog-sweeps-uk-film-awards.html

The Almighty Allah says,

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- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #2 on: Dec 31, 2008 04:31 AM »

 

I watched this last night. I've been dying to see it since I first heard about it months ago!! There's so much buzz around it and the premise just seemed so unique and interesting.

It's a great film, very powerful. It brings home a lot of issues specific to india and the third world like poverty, orphans, slums, prostution rings, child labour, gangsters, human trafficking, child begging rings, stealing, ripping off tourists, torture. Brought out all these ugly things that should really make this a depressing movie, but somehow the story is actually uplifting. All the actors were excellent as well. Especially the one's who played the kids.  It's not exactly a comfortable movie but it is one that will open your point of view and stay with you for a long time.

Some of the things I didn't like: There's a lot of bad language that I think they could have toned down. (Understanding the bad language in both English or Hindi probably made it worse for me. Kind of like double expletives.) There were some torture/violence/brutality/vulgar type scenes but I've seen much worse and the point is to show how horrible it is over there. Overall it's still worth seeing if you're into these types of films. It's definitely not for everyone. I think people who would like it are those independent film buffs who watch a lot of crazy stuff. It showed quite a lot of India's ugly underbelly of the abject millions of poor and reminded me a lot of films like Salaam! Bombay and Shadows of Time.





MAJOR SPOILERS:










One thing that I really disliked was that they showed his brother, who is a bad/shady character that works for a gangster praying on a janemaz in a kufi at some random point (probably before going off to kill someone) and then he raises his hands and makes dua like 'oh God forgive me for my sins' and in another place he's like 'God is great!' uhhhhhhhhhhhh guess we cant have any type of indian movie without the muslim sterotyping.

I didn't understand his whole thoughts on his mother's death? He blamed both "Allah and Ram"? I didn't really understand the brother's character until I read some more things about it. I felt the ending was really open ended. Like what happens now?? Would the gangster find them? What would he do with the money? Maybe it just doesn't matter? And the whole bollywood song at the end...cute but is it in character or out of character...seemed weird. I like how they did it in Bend it Like Beckham, kind of as a joke and funny bloopers thing.

Anyway over all excellent, I'm still thinking about it now and will probably watch it again for the nuances!!

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« Reply #3 on: Jan 07, 2009 07:03 PM »

peace be upon you

These days I am in Karachi, visiting mother and siblings, and other relatives.

I watched slumdog millionaire a couple of noights ago. It was superb. Then I read the book on which the film is based. Theer are a few changes, but the book is fantastic, too. I think the film deserves the acclaim it got. I am going to see it again a few times.

Other films I have seen since this are:

      i. Slumdog Millionaire
      ii. Taarey zameen par
      iii. dasvindian
      iv. Mr and Mrs. Iyer
      v. Earth - Nandita Das
                     vi. Parsandania - Naseeruddin Shah
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« Reply #4 on: Jan 08, 2009 10:45 PM »

Salaam,

Yeah I saw the movie a few weeks back and really enjoyed it as well. India etc are some sad places (well some parts at least). It was good to see the country's underbelly as you referred to it. I think it was very well done. Almost wish I read the book too. Oh well, I'm not going to do that now:)

I recommend it as well.

peace
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« Reply #5 on: Jan 09, 2009 06:04 PM »

The movie was good overall-- nonetheless sad, the children in the earlier sequences where heartbreaking beautiful... especially jamal, I wish I could shelter them from the evil world that they had to experience.

Btw, I kinda liked the soundtrack as well:)

"...Surely my prayer and my sacrifice, my life and my death are for Allah, the Lord of the Worlds..." (Qur'an, 6:162)
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« Reply #6 on: Jan 10, 2009 01:02 AM »

ooh, I wanna watch this.  I really like the trailer and the premise seems interesting.  I remember watching Salaam Bombay when I was a child and it had a very big impact on me.  i can still remember the heartbreaking ending. 

"Even after all this time, the sun never says to the earth “you owe me”. Look what happens with a love like that, it lights the whole sky." Hafiz
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« Reply #7 on: Jan 12, 2009 06:10 AM »

I watched it over the weekend and thoroughly enjoyed it.  I found myself rooting for Jamal to win just like the millions of people who were watching him on TV!

The Mumbai slum reminded of the Nairobi slums.  They were almost the same!


The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #8 on: Jan 13, 2009 06:13 AM »

Interesting article on the movie. Don't read if you haven't seen the movie yet!!

====================================================
Slumdog Millionaire: the first film of the Obama era
Slumdog Millionaire – Golden Globes winner and hot tip for Oscars – is a British movie whose influence will be felt all over the world.
 

By David Gritten
Last Updated: 11:17PM GMT 12 Jan 2009
The first film of the Obama era The first film of the Obama era
Slumdog Millionaire ? Golden Globes winner and hot tip for Oscars ? is a British movie whose influence will be felt all over the world

It has been an earth-shaking few days for British director Danny Boyle, screenwriter Simon Beaufoy and the cast of their Mumbai-set movie Slumdog Millionaire. The film has captured the imagination of the public and critics alike, and is the clear front-runner for the forthcoming Bafta and Oscar awards. On Sunday evening it dominated the Golden Globes, triumphing in all four categories in which it was nominated, including best dramatic picture. Boyle and Beaufoy walked away with individual awards, as did A R Rahman, the celebrated Indian film composer who wrote its score.

Here in Britain, Slumdog Millionaire opened brightly on Friday, accumulating a weekend gross of some £1.75 million. By last night, it was confidently expected to have overtaken all rivals to become the number one film at the UK box office.

These are heady days, then, for this film, which is both likeable and, despite its Mumbai setting, very British (more of which later). In the current awards season, it clearly has what industry insiders like to call "momentum". But the influence of Slumdog Millionaire could be felt well beyond this year's Oscar ceremony. Indeed, I wonder whether, in coming years, we shall not regard it as the first emblematic film of the Barack Obama era.

This is not merely because I think the US President-elect would like Slumdog Millionaire – though I am confident that he would. It is more that the film is such a radical contender for Oscars, and in ways that correspond to what appears to be Obama's world view.

To recap briefly, Slumdog Millionaire is the story of Jamal, a sweet-natured, uneducated teenage orphan from Mumbai's appalling slums who serves tea to call-centre workers. By a fluke, he becomes a contestant on the Hindi version of Who Wants to be a Millionaire? and, astonishingly, finds himself on the verge of winning a fortune. Suspected of cheating, he is brutally interrogated by police. But in recounting incidents in his eventful life, he shows how he knew the answers to the specific questions.

The first striking thing about this British-made film is its even-handed, generous spirit of universality. It is set in India and it's about Indians. There is no hint of Merchant Ivory decorum, the predicaments of rich westerners far from home, nor any notion that Boyle and his team were engaged in a David Lean-style imperial adventure in what was once one of the pink regions on the globe. Refreshingly, there is also no white character to "explain" the story (which needs no explanation) to western audiences.

Similarly, Slumdog Millionaire is faithful to the language of its characters. At least a third of it is spoken in Hindi; Boyle playfully placed his subtitles in different parts of the screen in various scenes, a tacit concession to American and British audiences traditionally deterred by them.

It is also notable that Jamal is a Muslim. Screenwriter Beaufoy profoundly altered his source material, Indian author Vikas Swarup's agreeable, amusing novel Q&A. Swarup's hero was called Ram Mohammed Thomas, a name with Hindu, Muslim and Christian connotations, suggesting an Indian everyman. Beaufoy deliberately plumped for a specifically Muslim hero.

Furthermore the film is decidedly 21st century in its portrayal of a teeming city. One of the mixed blessings of globalisation is the tendency of Third World populations to migrate from rural areas, thereby creating sprawling, unwieldy mega-cities, such as Mexico City, Sao Paulo, Nairobi and, of course, Mumbai.

Boyle and Beaufoy show in detail the devastating social problems in such a place – pimps, prostitutes, men who exploit children as beggars, murderous race riots and organised crime – as well as its frenetic buzz, its juxtaposition of extreme wealth and poverty and, despite everything, its giddy sense of exhilaration. Most urban films don't come close to capturing the modern city in this way.

Nor are they made as cheaply as this one. Boyle, who used hand-held cameras and a mostly local Indian crew, told me recently that Slumdog Millionaire cost a mere $5 million to shoot – a pittance in modern film terms. But then he was not burdened by expensive western stars. Anil Kapoor, who plays the quiz show presenter, is a bona fide Bollywood superstar and Irrfan Khan, the police interrogator, is a distinguished Indian actor. But neither commands vast fees. The entire cast is largely unknown to western audiences, and it has not hindered its success a jot.

If that hints at a new way forward for the film industry in this credit-crunch era, so does the theme of Slumdog Millionaire. One of the delights of Beaufoy's script is a contradiction: the portrayal of a city obsessed with amassing wealth – the hustle, the deal, the next get-rich-quick scheme – with a romantic young man at its centre who cares nothing for money. Instead, the overwhelmingly important thing in his life is his love for Latika, a slum girl he has known since childhood. He loses her for years at a time, and finally finds her living as a wealthy gangster's girlfriend and pleads with her to run away with him. "What will we live on?" she asks anxiously, in the story's key exchange. "Love," he says, simply.

And in that single word lie the key qualities of Slumdog Millionaire. It does not have an ironic moment. It is utterly devoid of cynicism. Instead, it is bright-eyed, optimistic – idealistic, even. To generations reared on a drip-feed of corrosive cynicism, the elevation of greed for greed's sake and weary disillusion with our leaders and our institutions it feels almost shocking.

Yet maybe we're ready for it. We saw these laudable qualities in the hundreds of thousands of people (most of them young) who toiled to elect Obama. Those whose work limits them to poring over the minutiae of life in Washington's Beltway and the Westminster village have already been murmuring that this idealism looks like naïveté. Yet look where our defensive cynicism has landed us: maybe we do need to look at the world anew.

Slumdog Millionaire holds out this promise, and the one inescapable truth about the film is that the people who see it love it. Its word-of-mouth reputation, the strongest, most positive of any film in memory, has grown gradually since it was first screened in September at the Toronto Film Festival, where it won the audience award.

Since then, its US distributors Fox Searchlight (a Hollywood studio subsidiary headed by an astute Englishman, Peter Rice) have shrewdly released the film gradually in relatively few American cinemas, allowing word-of-mouth to burnish its stature. Happily, that process finally bore fruit this last memorable weekend, and will surely continue to do so.

Let us not forget this is a British triumph. Film 4, the film-production wing of Channel 4, originally optioned Sharup's novel before publication, and hired Beaufoy to adapt it. When Boyle came on board, he urged Beaufoy to focus on the love story he had devised (which was absent from Sharup's book). Film 4 was able to develop and finance the film with Celador, the British company that created Who Wants to be a Millionaire?

The film has had its setbacks. Its original US distributors, Warner Independent, sceptical about its commercial prospects, pulled out, but Rice's Fox Searchlight stepped into the breach.

In many respects, Slumdog Millionaire could only be British. It is technically adept in a manner that still eludes India's Bollywood cinema; Boyle is at the top of his form. Its subject matter is too foreign and remote to have been initiated by Hollywood; we British are not quite so insular in our world-view. And would any US studio bigwig approve a film with a Muslim hero?

Next week, millions of Americans – and no doubt hundreds of thousands of Britons – will cluster around television sets to watch the inauguration of Barack Obama, whose election victory is rooted in the notion that while the world may be troubled, complex, and even ugly, our best instincts can help make it better. Slumdog Millionaire – a truly remarkable film – is rooted in that same idealism.
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« Reply #9 on: Jan 25, 2009 05:23 AM »

    Yet the truth, as I discovered during a chilling week-long investigation, is more disturbing than anything dreamt up by the creators of Slumdog Millionaire.

    For in Mumbai, as well as in other major Indian cities, hundreds of young children have had their arms and legs chopped off; scores of others have been blinded. The gangs also pour acid on to the children’s bodies, leaving them with suppurating wounds.

    Their suffering comes down to one thing: money. In a country of 1.2 billion people, where the gulf between rich and poor is vast, there are an estimated 300,000 child beggars.

    By no means all are mutilated by the beggar mafia, but those with the worst injuries do make the most money — up to £10 a day for deformed children, a fortune in a country where millions survive on just a tenth of that.

Read the complete article here: Daily Mail Online (UK): The real Slumdog Millionaires: Behind the cinema fantasy, mafia gangs are deliberately crippling children for profit
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« Reply #10 on: Jan 25, 2009 08:15 AM »

I saw the movie earlier this week and I seem to be the only person so far who has felt really queasy about the movie.  Even my hubby, family and friends love this movie, but
there's just something about it that stops me from saying it's a good movie.  After discussing this with hubby, I've figured out it's because it's *too* real; it's very grim and disturbing at times, and it seems that's what I seem to remember more about the movie, rather than the good stuff.

Which is rather odd, as I have seen more disturbing stuff before, and most of this film tends to allude to things, rather than show you something horrific right out, and I’ve also read a lot on world affairs which show the dark reality of the world we live in.  Hm, so, I don’t know, maybe right now, I’ve reached the point where I can only take so much in of all the bad things that happen in the world, and therefore I can’t appreciate this film as awhole, including all its good bits.


Btw, I actually liked the song and dance bit at the end.  I took it as them doing it more as a laugh and yet at the same time giving a nod (akin to showing respect) to what seems to define the typical Indian movie.


'If he woke up and had enough food for the day and shelter (a roof over his head) and he does not fear for his safety, then it is as if he has been given the dunya.'
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« Reply #11 on: Jan 25, 2009 09:31 AM »

This movie portrays real life.  A life that people in parts of the world live.

Perhaps that is why it makes some queasy, uncomfortable or downright disgusting.  But in cities with slums much of what has been captured in the film and far worse happen.

But for people who have seen this first hand, the film is amazing in showing life in the slums.

Here is a link that is very interesting and also the actress talking about the film in an interview.

http://www.indiaglitz.com/channels/hindi/article/44533.html

http://www.bollywoodhungama.com/broadband/video/Interviews/VM3kwT54/3/Freida-Pinto-Speaks-About-Slumdog-Millionaire.html

I watched a bollywood film called "Page 3" last night released on January 21, 2005.  Slumdog millionaire will look tame compared to it.  It was grim and gross.  It had children being used and abused by male adults.  Some of these children were taken from Orphanages and the streets by these people.  Utterly disgusting.  But then again, it is the truth not shown or known by many people.

http://www.apunkachoice.com/dyn/movies/hindi/page_3/

http://planetbollywood.com/Film/Page3/

 

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #12 on: Jan 25, 2009 06:36 PM »

But that’s just it sis Halima, I know this stuff is *real*.  I've actually worked with issues which some might find uncomfortable or disgusting.  I’ve worked with people who have been sexually abused, to help them overcome their trauma, and those who have been raped, including men.  And I am just about to start working with people who are refugees
and asylum seekers (I have had to really fight for this position and alhumdulilah I’ve got it) and help them deal with the various other traumas they have faced.  Maybe this is why I couldn’t appreciate the film like others, because it’s too close to home, because I’ve worked with people who have faced some of the issues raised in the movie, and I couldn’t watch it objectively.

But who knows, maybe this will open up the eyes of others, and in that way, it may well be a good movie.


'If he woke up and had enough food for the day and shelter (a roof over his head) and he does not fear for his safety, then it is as if he has been given the dunya.'
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« Reply #13 on: Feb 22, 2009 11:46 PM »

Asalamualaikum

The kidnapping children and cutting off their body parts is not uncommon in Pakistan either. Someone from sisters inlaws was kidnapped and he actually saw the place where they were doing this but alhumdulilah he escaped

I have not seen the movie but here are some different perspectives

Slumdog Reality? http://www.counterpunch.org/larson02202009.html

Slumdog Millionaires Dehumanizing View of Indias Poor
   http://www.counterpunch.org/sengupta02202009.html
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« Reply #14 on: Feb 23, 2009 07:46 AM »

salaam

They won! But it was really sad to see that the child actors father was sitting out on the street watching from the slums. 
These are children, They should have had the parents come with them. Even families of adult actors come so why not parents of these Children!
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/02/23/slumdog-kids-neighbors-in_n_169032.html

Also if they were underpaid and the fact they will recieve something 'if and when' they turn eighteen is unfair.
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« Reply #15 on: Feb 23, 2009 09:29 AM »

ws,

it was nice to see AR Rahman on stage and saying 'God is Great!'  that was really cool to see on an oscar stage!

as for the kids... when they first made the film they did not know that it would reach these kinds of heights.. the child actors were paid what is usually paid (and very well compared to anything else) and the money went into funds for their education in the future as well. the film was dropped by the original production company and at one point they thought it would just go straight to dvd. but then fox searchlight picked it up because they're into independent type films. and the film took off after that...

as for all the families coming to US and all... first the child actors were very lucky because even though they had small parts they were invited to the oscars...the company got all the kids there along with one adult each from their families they did all the visa work and everything all last minute.
all those movies that were nominated have thousands of little actors throughout they can't invite all of them and in other films you never see those actors there unless they're nominated.

i just personally think all the criticism directed at them is kind of over the top. they're making a movie to highlight some issue they can't really save the world i think that job belongs to the rest of us Wink

as for the father.. he's not actually sitting in the street... that's his house!!! the saddest thing is that he and all those people there are muslims, so in the end... who should be criticized... some people who made some film, or us muslims who do nothing about our people living like that in real life. Sad Sad
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« Reply #16 on: Feb 23, 2009 01:52 PM »

I thought the vulgarity of the movie made it more effective....but somehow I don't see it as a bleak, grim and glum movie.

Just a few things: jannah -- the Allah and Ram thing - those were Hindus that came into the slums and killed his mother.  Which is why he blamed Allah and Ram -- or rather religion.

Also the other theme I thinki they brilliantly worked into the movie was that of destiny ... where his brother sits himself in the bathtub at the end, just as he's winning.  Food for thought on the whole free will and destiny debate.

I liked it!

Wasalaam.

P.S. What's wrong with this board? Is it just me, or can you not use your mouse to redirect the cursor?
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« Reply #17 on: Feb 23, 2009 09:57 PM »

are y'all using internet explorer or something?? yes i know he was blaming religion...but why blame religion when it's due to wack ppl.

i was curious to know how much they were paid...here's some info:
Quote
Initially, the children were to paid up to Rs.150 per day for the smallest role in the movie, according to Khan. The producers entered into a separate arrangement with Azharuddin and paid him a monthly retainership of Rs.5,000 for over a year for his work in the movie.

Later, Azharuddin was paid around Rs.175,000 which has been put aside in a bank account. The producers have also put aside another Rs.2.5 million which he will get when he turns 18, Khan claimed.

As the movie gained in popularity and earned critical acclaim worldwide, Azharuddin's family members told the producers they were homeless and were in need of a small house.

"The producers have agreed tentatively to provide a home to Azharuddin and his co-star Rubina Ali, also living in Garib Nagar slum. I showed them around some flats costing Rs.1.75 million, but the producers have kept a decision in abeyance. We are hopeful, now with so many honours to their credit, the producers will not disappoint these two children," Khan claimed.

Apart from 17 children from Garib Nagar, 10 children were selected from Dharavi - notorious as Asia's largest slum. A couple of girls was chosen from Jogeshwari, one from Malad, and five children from Nala Sopara suburb in Thane district for bit roles, Khan said.

Indo-Asian News Service

so it's about $1,000 initially and about $4,000 right now and $20,000 when he come's of age. seems like a good amount to be paid for an unknown child actor in a film. that amount of money is quite a lot for india...of course the studios are making millions of dollars on the film. should they give them a bonus? probably...even better would be if they could set up some kind of foundation to help those people. i'm sure everyone who watched the film would love to donate to it.


the kids at the oscars:
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« Reply #18 on: Feb 24, 2009 04:15 AM »

why blame religion when it's due to wack ppl.

haven't you noticed yet? The new religion of today is to blame religion for all the ills of society. This has been the message from secular Bollywood in many films, and I have no doubt, from the British film industry as well.

Religion, in their opinion, is your private affair, or at most for worship alone. It has nothing to do with finding a partner (multi-faith love is all the rage).

Well, secularism is better than Hindutva.
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« Reply #19 on: Feb 24, 2009 06:45 AM »

that little kid is so cute... the small jamal. you just want to squeeze him!
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