Peace be upon you,
    Welcome to Madinat Al-Muslimeen, the City of the Muslims. Please feel free to visit the different hot spots around the Madina and post any discussion, articles, suggestions, comments, art, poetry, events, recipes, etc etc. Basically anything you would like to share with your sisters and brothers!! Non-muslims are also of course quite welcome to share their comments. If this is your first time here, you need to register with the city council. Once you register you have 15 days to post your mandatory introduction and then you will be upgraded to a Madina Citizen, God Willing. Please note that our city does have regulations which are listed in the city constitution. Read them carefully before moving in. P.S. - You can also post anonymously if you wish. P.S.S. - Also be sure to check out our ARCHIVES from 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 & 2007. :)

Random Quote: Put aside your pride, Set down your arrogance, And remember your grave. - Ali ibn Abu Talib (radiAllahu anhu)
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: US panel presents sobering report on WMD threat  (Read 603 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Halima
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 39
Halima is working their way up :)Halima is working their way up :)Halima is working their way up :)
Gender: Female
Posts: 1714



« on: Dec 04, 2008 09:24 AM »


US panel presents sobering report on WMD threat

Wed Dec 3, 9:46 am ET

WASHINGTON (AFP) – The authors of a report warning that a nuclear or biological attack is likely within five years present their sobering findings on Wednesday to vice-president-elect Joseph Biden.

The bipartisan commission will also brief President George W. Bush on their report, which accuses his administration of failing to treat possible biological attacks with the same priority as the spread of nuclear weapons.

The report, "World at Risk," calls for decisive global action to address the threat, has been prepared by the Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism.

It urges the creation of a new post in the White House that would focus solely on overseeing government efforts to prevent an attack with weapons of mass destruction.

President-elect Barack Obama will likely carry out that recommendation, the Boston Globe reported on Wednesday, citing three unnamed advisers to the next president.

"I think it is a good idea and will probably happen" soon after Obama takes over on January 20, one adviser told the paper.

The commission, which includes several Democrats who have advised Obama's team, was to brief both Biden and Arizona Governor Janet Napolitano, who Obama has named as the next homeland security secretary.

The report says terrorists are likely to stage a nuclear or biological weapons attack somewhere in the world in the next five years. And it singles out Pakistan as the weakest link in world security.

Without urgent action, "it is more likely than not that a weapon of mass destruction will be used in a terrorist attack somewhere in the world by the end of 2013," the commission said.

"America's margin of safety is shrinking," it said.

The report's alarming conclusions met a skeptical response from some security experts. They have argued that terrorists were still more likely to use low-tech means, such as the assailants armed with AK-47 assault rifles in last week's bloody rampage in Mumbai.

Representative Jane Harman, the Democrat heading the Homeland Security Subcommittee on Intelligence and Terrorism Risk Assessment, also played down the warnings. "It's time to retire the fear card," she said in a statement.

"We need to educate and inform the American people, not terrify them with alarming details about possible threats to the homeland ... Congress has in fact done a great deal to minimize and mitigate WMD threats."

The commission has identified the main dangers as the rapid spread of nuclear technology in countries such as Pakistan and Iran; and poor security in biotech industries worldwide.

Although Pakistan is a close US ally, its inability to control swaths of territory, violent political instability, and a nuclear standoff with neighboring India make the Islamic nation the greatest risk, it argued.

"Were one to map terrorism and weapons of mass destruction today, all roads would intersect in Pakistan," the report said.

"There is a grave danger it could also be an unwitting source of a terrorist attack on the United States, possibly with weapons of mass destruction," the report added.

Asked by CNN television to respond to the report, the country's president, Asif Ali Zardari, appeared to acknowledge that Pakistan served as a base for terrorist groups.

It was a situation "which we have inherited," Zardari told CNN in an interview aired Tuesday.

"It's a part of the Afghan problem, part of the war in Afghanistan, part of the war in our northern regions. That is an issue that needs more attention. And I'm hoping that the new administration coming in will work with us to look into it for a regional solution," Zardari said.

The commission said terrorists were more likely to be able to obtain biological than nuclear weapons, with anthrax a particular danger. It warned that threats are "evolving faster than our multi-layered response."

In an interview with Newsweek magazine, former senator Bob Graham, co-chair of the commission, said he was surprised by the scale of the threats associated with biological weapons.

"When you think weapons of mass destruction, you tend to think mushroom cloud. But the ubiquitous nature of pathogens and the increasing lethality of both natural and synthetic pathogens led our commission to conclude it's more likely that an attack will come biologically rather than nuclear."

Despite the report's criticisms of US policies, the White House welcomed what it said was proof of Bush's strong security record.

"Under President Bush's leadership, extensive progress has been made on securing the world's weapons of mass destruction and protecting our citizens from a WMD attack," White House spokesman Scott Stanzel said.

The commission was led by Graham, a Democrat, and former congressman James Talent, a Republican.

The commission was tasked by Congress in 2007 as part of the security response to the hijacked airliner attacks of September 11, 2001 against New York and the Pentagon.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081203/wl_asia_afp/usattackswmdpakistan_081203144605;_ylt=Ahgncbr.CIjQXIe97pD3pUwb.3QA



[attachment deleted by admin]

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
Halima
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 39
Halima is working their way up :)Halima is working their way up :)Halima is working their way up :)
Gender: Female
Posts: 1714



« Reply #1 on: Dec 04, 2008 09:28 AM »

World not doing enough on WMD terror threat: Biden

Wed Dec 3, 6:49 pm ET

WASHINGTON (AFP) – Vice president-elect Joe Biden Wednesday warned more must be done to thwart the threat of terrorism with weapons of mass destruction, after a report warned such an attack was likely within five years.

Members of the congressionally mandated panel which produced the report warning of assaults with nuclear or biological weapons, briefed Biden, and Barack Obama's nominee for Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano.

Biden said the Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism had been asked by Congress to ask whether enough was being done on the hot-button issue.

"The answer that jumps out very starkly is no, we are not doing all we can or should," Biden said.

"We're not doing all we can to prevent the world's most lethal weapons from winding up in the hands of terrorists.

"This report is more than a warning about what we are doing wrong. It's a pragmatic blueprint for how to get it right," he said.

Napolitano added that the threat of an attack on US soil could be "dramatically reduced through a coherent and sustained strategy to improve our vulnerabilities and to adapt to a new and evolving threat.

"We will act, in the words of the commission, with the urgency called for by the nature of the threat that confronts us.

The report said terrorists are likely to stage a nuclear or biological weapons attack somewhere in the world in the next five years and singled out Pakistan as the weakest link in world security.

Without urgent action, "it is more likely than not that a weapon of mass destruction will be used in a terrorist attack somewhere in the world by the end of 2013," the commission said.

"America's margin of safety is shrinking," it said.

President George W. Bush earlier met all nine members of the bipartisan panel and aides said he was working with Obama's transition team to improve US counter-terrorism efforts.

The report, "World at Risk," urges the creation of a new post in the White House that would focus solely on overseeing government efforts to prevent an attack with weapons of mass destruction.




[attachment deleted by admin]

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
Halima
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 39
Halima is working their way up :)Halima is working their way up :)Halima is working their way up :)
Gender: Female
Posts: 1714



« Reply #2 on: Dec 04, 2008 09:33 AM »

U.S. must halt spread of nuclear, bio weapons: Biden

By Randall Mikkelsen Randall Mikkelsen – Wed Dec 3, 8:06 pm ET

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The United States has done too little to fight the spread of weapons of mass destruction, U.S. Vice President-elect Joe Biden said on Wednesday, as he got a congressional report warning of their pressing threat.

Biden's appearance reflected what was likely to be a continuing interest in weapons issues in the administration of President-elect Barack Obama, an aide said.

"We're not doing all we can to prevent the world's most lethal weapons from winding up in the hands of terrorists," Biden told reporters at Obama's Washington transition headquarters.

As he met with members of the Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism, Biden said he looked forward to talking to Obama "about the steps our administration should be taking to make this country more secure."

Biden was accompanied by Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano, Obama's pick to be Secretary of Homeland Security when he takes over as president from George W. Bush on January 20.

Biden, a veteran Delaware senator known for congressional connections and foreign policy experience, has kept a low profile as Obama's number two since the November 4 election and given little indication of his potential focus in the job.

He did not respond to a reporter who asked whether he had made any decisions about his new role.

Biden's spokesman Elizabeth Alexander said weapons of mass destruction issues "have been an area of great concern to the vice president-elect throughout his career and he will continue to be active and involved on them in the administration."

WARNING OF ATTACK BY 2013

The report, details of which leaked out before its release on Wednesday, was mandated by Congress last year in line with recommendations by an earlier commission on the September 11 attacks by al Qaeda militants in 2001.

It warned that "unless the world community acts decisively and with great urgency, it is more likely than not that a weapon of mass destruction will be used in a terrorist attack somewhere in the world by the end of 2013."

The attack was more likely to be biological than nuclear, it said. A source involved with the report said the attack could be as small as a single anthrax-tainted letter.

The report recommended steps that included tightening supervision of U.S. biological laboratories, strengthening international nuclear nonproliferation agreements and discouraging financial incentives for civilian nuclear power.

It also called for a threat of "direct action" to back up diplomacy aimed at stopping Iran and North Korea from developing a nuclear arsenal.

"The report clearly shows that the United States must act urgently, deliberately and in concert with nations across the globe," Napolitano said. "I know that it's the priority of the Obama-Biden administration."

But the report drew skepticism from at least one potential member of the Obama administration.

"It's time to retire the fear card," said Democrat Jane Harman, head of a Homeland Security subcommittee on intelligence and terrorism risk in the House of Representatives.

Harman, seen as a potential pick by Obama for a top intelligence post, said Congress had already taken significant steps.

Commission member Henry Sokolski, a former senior Defense Department nonproliferation official, wrote in an "additional views" paper on the commission's website that he feared the report gave too little attention to preventing more countries from acquiring nuclear weapons, which he called the most significant near-term danger.

(Editing by John O'Callaghan)

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20081204/pl_nm/us_usa_security_obama_biden_1;_ylt=AjW_1T7q2ltEFZdkL5hQWCutOrgF


[attachment deleted by admin]

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: