// Teachers 'beat and abuse' Muslim Children in British Koran Classes
    Peace be upon you,
    Welcome to Madinat Al-Muslimeen, the City of the Muslims. Please feel free to visit the different hot spots around the Madina and post any discussion, articles, suggestions, comments, art, poetry, events, recipes, etc etc. Basically anything you would like to share with your sisters and brothers!! Non-muslims are also of course quite welcome to share their comments. If this is your first time here, you need to register with the city council. Once you register you have 15 days to post your mandatory introduction and then you will be upgraded to a Madina Citizen, God Willing. Please note that our city does have regulations which are listed in the city constitution. Read them carefully before moving in. P.S. - You can also post anonymously if you wish. P.S.S. - Also be sure to check out our ARCHIVES from 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 & 2007. :)

Random Quote: Reliability: The Prophet said: 'He who does not keep his trusts lacks in faith and he who does not keep his agreements lacks in religion'. (Shu'ab Al-Îmân Al-Bayhaqî)
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Teachers 'beat and abuse' Muslim Children in British Koran Classes  (Read 2132 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« on: Dec 10, 2008 03:55 PM »


Salaam.
Personally I dont care if they are an imam or sheikh, if they seriously hurt my child Im going to file charges!!!

The Times
December 10, 2008

Teachers 'beat and abuse' Muslim children in British Koran classes
Happy and confident children being taught the Koran at the Jamia Chistia mosque in Rochdale, one of 1,600 madrassas that exist in Britain

Richard Kerbaj
Muslim children are being beaten and abused regularly by teachers at some British madrassas - Islamic evening classes - an investigation by The Times has found.

Students have been slapped, punched and had their ears twisted, according to an unpublished report by an imam based on interviews with victims in the north of England. One was “picked up by one leg and spun around” while another said a madrassa teacher was “kicking in my head - like a football”, says the report which was compiled by Irfan Chishti, a former government adviser on Islamic affairs.

Almost 1,600 madrassas operate in Britain, teaching Arabic and the Koran on weekday evenings to about 200,000 children aged from four to their mid-teens.

While there is no hard evidence to indicate how many are involved in the physical abuse of children, The Times has uncovered a disturbing pattern in one town - Rochdale - through interviews with mainstream school teachers, Muslim parents and the children themselves.

Related Links
ANALYSIS: laws must cover madrassas as well
CASE STUDY: a brave face, then the tears
One woman told The Times that her niece Hiba, 7, was slapped across the face so hard by her madrassa teacher that her ear was cut. It later became inflamed and she had to have emergency medical treatment.

When the teacher refused to apologise, Hiba's aunt, Jamila, insisted that her niece should be moved to another madrassa. “I have absolutely no respect for religious teachers who behave like this,” she said.

Another girl described how, at the age of 12, she was hit by her madrassa teacher whenever she mispronounced a word or forgot a verse of the Koran.

When Imam Chishti, a religious education teacher who also runs the Light of Islam Academy in Rochdale, decided to carry out his own investigation into the problem he was shocked by how even the victims had grown to accept the abuse. “They all joked about it,” he said. “There's a culture that accepts it.”

Imam Chishti said that part of the problem was that some madrassa teachers were ignorant of British law. Corporal punishment was banned in state schools in 1986 and in all schools in 1998. Under current law teachers acting in loco parentis may use only “reasonable punishment” such as a smack, providing it does not cause any marks or bruising.

But the abuse discovered by The Times investigation goes far beyond what could be termed “reasonable force”. One particularly brutal form of punishment practised in some madrassas is known as the Hen, in which the victim is forced to hold his ears while squatting with his arms fed through his legs.

The magnitude of the problem in Rochdale has led primary school head teachers to break the silence surrounding the problem. Several disclosed that they had asked social services to investigate complaints of physical abuse in madrassas made by pupils but that the victims' parents refused to press charges against the perpetrators either because they felt that physical abuse was normal practice or they feared being ostracised by their community.

Tina Wheatley, deputy head of Heybrook Primary School, said: “If a child comes in with an injury of any sort and it's non-accidental, then schools will refer it to parents, then also to child protection.”

But she said that social workers were often faced by parents who refused to take action against the abusers. “When child protection turns up at the parents' [home], parents don't want to take it any further. There are a lot of head teachers in this area who have spoken to the authorities. It's so sensitive,” she said.

Sandra Hartley, head teacher at Brimrod County Primary School in Rochdale, where 93 per cent of pupils are Muslim, said that she feared that some Muslim parents regarded physical beatings as normal because they had been subjected to the same treatment when they were children.

“You know, it's very much accepted that children are experiencing that type of coercion, unfair treatment and sometimes physical abuse,” she said. “Parents knowing that this is happening and not wanting to move their child from that type of extra-curricular activity is very much the pattern that we have here.”

The Times has also learnt that Rochdale police and social services have met local Muslim leaders six times this year to discuss child protection issues after investigations prompted by claims of physical abuse at madrassas.

Terry Piggott, the executive director of Rochdale Borough Council, admitted that it was difficult for the authorities to take action.

“Because of the rapid turnover of volunteer teachers at madrassas - and the fact that many are part-time - it makes it difficult to regulate and monitor the people who are working with local young people,” he said in a statement.

The problem is not confined to Rochdale. Ann Cryer, Labour MP for the Yorkshire constituency of Keighley which has a large Muslim population, said that mainstream teachers had complained to her about the punishment their students faced at madrassas. She added her voice to those from Muslim community calling for madrassas to be brought within the regulatory framework.“I think we should have some sort of review at a very high level as to how madrassas are being [run] ... they seem to be a law unto themselves,” she said.

Madrassas and similar religious classes are not subject to any regulation nor are their teachers required to be vetted by the Criminal Records Bureau. Many madrassas are not even known to the authorities because they are run on an ad hoc basis by people in their own living rooms. Even those attached to a mosque which is registered with the Charities Commission are not monitored.

Ms Cryer called for the authorities to be given powers to perform “spot checks” on madrassas and shut down any in which children are being abused.“As the Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities grow so do the number of madrassas and therefore the risk to children increases every year,” she said.

The Mosques and Imams National Advisory Board (Minab) - a government approved organisation established in 2006 - has set up a minimum standard for mosques which includes guidelines to safeguard child welfare. However, membership is purely voluntary and Minab has yet to recruit a single mosque.

A spokesman for the board, Yousif Al-Khoei, admitted that some mosques were run by teachers who may be abusing children.

“There is of course a minority of madrassas which have a village mindset who may be practising it but you have to look at it from both angles,” he said. “No community is perfect.”

The Minister for Community Cohesion, Sadiq Khan, urged his fellow Muslims to turn in those responsible for violence against children.

“We need to have religious leaders saying in clear and religious messages that it's unacceptable and that there's no place in Islam for child abuse. It's pure village culture mentality,” he said. “Everybody should expose this. The neighbours who know about it should expose it, the teachers [at mainstream schools] should expose it. We need a culture which says that whistleblowing on these things is a badge of pride not a badge of shame.”

He added: “We are hiding behind the defence of cultural sensitivities and our children are not being protected.”

The Department for Children, Schools and Families said: “We're crystal clear that all organisations, including faith-based, must abide by children protection and safeguarding laws.

“Any actions that go beyond reasonable punishment are absolutely unacceptable and must be dealt with the courts. We urge anyone who is aware of such incidents to report them to the police and relevant authorities.”

lucid
Bro
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 15
lucid has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 387



« Reply #1 on: Dec 10, 2008 05:19 PM »

assalamualaikum

this is so true.  i stopped over for a day from america with my aunt in london a long time ago.  my aunt took me to a mosque where my cousin went to "sunday school"  for arabic classes.  what i saw totally shocked me.  the teachers beat him and other students. kicked them, i think even punched them. i've never seen kids abused so badly and nobody not care.

things like that could never happen in America.  but in Britain, really weird villagey stuff happens. 
timbuktu
Guest
« Reply #2 on: Dec 10, 2008 05:48 PM »

peace be upon you

Ignoring problems does not make them go away.

There is abuse of authority. Are these teachers from villages, simple rote-learners, or is there a problem with us in general.

This will cause rebellion, and may lead to apostacy. Who runs these schools?

I have described two brothers, who sons of a famous scholar of deoband, broke every taboo, and the younger brother told me it was because their life at home was very strict.

What is wrong with Muslims? Can everything be blamed on the corrupt West, or the corrupt non-Muslims?

When I moved my children from a private school to a government-run one, my son suddenly stopped speaking. I knew something had happened, but he wouldn't tell me. Eventually after a week he told me that on the very first day, not one but all teachers beat every child. He would also have been beaten, but the others told the teachers he was new, so on that day he was spared, but not on subsequent days. When I reported this to my colleagues, they made fun of me: "Are you from Mars?", they asked.

I complained to the secretary of education, who talked to the Principal. When I met the Principal, he said the practice was necessary because the children were now coming from very unruly backgrounds.

I am sure my son received beatings at times, but he did not complain. He may have developed some emotional scars, but I hope ad pray they are cured. The teachers may have instilled some unjustified prejudices in him, but hopefully that will make his commitment to Islam more positive.

This rebellion is seen more in the West, and one wonders what will happen.

The rebellion is menifesting itself in other ways, and maybe this should be in a separate topic. So I will end this post here.
Blessedgrandma
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 6
Blessedgrandma has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 625



« Reply #3 on: Dec 11, 2008 03:23 AM »

Salaam.
Personally I dont care if they are an imam or sheikh, if they seriously hurt my child Im going to file charges!!!

You're much nicer than I, thank goodness my kids are adults now.
nuh
Guest
« Reply #4 on: Dec 11, 2008 02:48 PM »

As salaam alaikum.

Here is a good document that outlines some 'Principles for Principals'.

http://www.ahmed-deedat.co.za/downloads/2007/princforprinc.pdf

Please share this with administrators of you local Islamic school.

Ma'as salaama,
nuh
 bro
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #5 on: Dec 11, 2008 03:39 PM »

brother Timbuktu why didnt u take him out of that rediculous school?!!!!

timbuktu
Guest
« Reply #6 on: Dec 12, 2008 06:54 AM »

peace be upon you

There was nowhere else to go.

There were two reasons:

My children were doing good in that private school (Froebells International), but at a function the school administration showed the boys and girls (in their teens) getting prepared for their life ahead after school. The message was conveyed through a sort of mixed dance.

I said to the Principal that schooling is free in the West and the imparting of the drink and dance culture is also free. If I wanted to give this to my children, I would have stayed in the West, and not have them given a second-hand imitation of the West's culture, while paying for it.

All good private schools in Islamabad were doing the same.

Second, the school raised its fees to the extent that I couldn't meet my bills any more, despite substantial cuts in our standard of living. I had just built a house and was upto my neck in debt, a great deal of it from my father-in-law. Although both my wife and I worked, our income (the wife's and mine) had become insufficient with having to service the debts.

The wife wouldn't let me ask for re-scheduling this debt.

Eventually I had to ask my mother what sort of wife she had got me. Then my mother sent a message to my father-in-law, and he agreed to re-scheduling the debt. But the inflation was still too much. Our house was without paint or polish for five years. All of us used to go to Karachi every year. We stopped going even for Eids or family functions. No more holidays for us. Once in five years, only one from my household, usually me, would go to Karachi to see the family.

I had to reduce the education budget. All other cuts had already been made. The Islamabad Model Schools were better than other model government schools, but they had their problems.

When I complained to the Principal of the Islamabad model school, one religious sort of teacher was also sitting there. He said that he had also beaten the children. His justification: "There was this cane lying on the table. I understood that the previous teacher had beaten the children, and I felt like doing the same, so I also caned every child.".

I am sorry but many Qaris and religious teachers in schools are not always the best advertisements for Islam. Still, I ask myself who am I to blame anyone, when I fall far too short myself. And instead of criticizing, why did I not go into education myself?

It took me many more years of suffering to understand that this had been to tell me I was still away from the deen. In one of my posts I explained that I had complained to Allah (swt) that I hated being on the road to Hell. If He would set me back on the way to Islam, I will come back to Him. But when He cured my problems, and gave me much more than I had thought I was entitled to, my nafse ammara made my own Islamization very slow and erratic.

Allah was (and is) still kind, and gave me those jolts to realize what I was doing to myself.
Tabriz
Sis
Jr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 7
Tabriz has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 54


« Reply #7 on: Dec 16, 2008 05:35 AM »

Salams,

When my parents took us to the masjid in Pakistan, me 8, brother 6, the other brother 4 and another sis 3, they specifically told the teacher that we were not to be hit or punished in any manner.

In the first week that I was there, the teacher went mad and started beating a kid, and I happened to be sitting next to the kid getting beat, and when the teacher saw that I was looking at him in horror, he whippped out his stick and started beating me too. That was the most humiliating experience of my life!

I picked up my Quran and left with my siblings following after me, and the whole time the teacher kept threatening me that if I didn't come back he was going to beat me even more the next day. I ran all the way home. I collapsed into my grandmother's arms and told her what happened. She lifted my shirt to see my back and I had long welts from his stick which turned blue and black fast and lasted more than a week.

My grandfather saw that he went beet red! He put on his turban and his cane and said that he was going to beat the teacher on his back just like he beat me. And he took me along with him so I could watch him do it.

Just outside the masjid, there was a group of people and when we approached, the people were smaking the Hafiz, -the Quran teacher- and kicking him. After I had left, he became so enraged that he had broken a 14 year old's finger. Her relatives happened to live right next to the masjid and they got a hold of him fast.

He had to apologize in front of a council of elders and he was allowed to teach. But my family didnt' send me to the masjid again and we were taught at home.

Alas, my grandfather never did beat him, saying he was getting his punishment.





Fozia
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 124
Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 2661



« Reply #8 on: Dec 16, 2008 09:35 AM »

salam


The problem with British madrassa's is (or was) the fact that the teachers are not generally learned qualified teachers, they are from back home, grew up in the village and learned parrot fashion and teach the quran thus.

It took me to have my own children and look around to enroll them in madrassa with qualified teachers before I realised I'd been taught the arabic alphabet wrong!!!!

I remember one very memorable time as a child, we went along to saturday morning Madrassa class as the madrassa had suddenly decreed it compulsory (we went five days a week already from 5pm 7pm after school!).

As a child I delighted in learning the Quran, and I have a slight ability to pick up languages with ease, and I love love loved writing in arabic too.

Anyway, this saturday class was run by a specially horrendous teacher, he was known for his hitting. As a rule I generally avoided him like the plague, being a girl I was also put in classes run by female teachers, so I had managed to dodge this sadistic person for longer than most.
That Saturday my luck ran out.
When it came for my turn to read my lesson, the teacher suddenly demanded to know if it was true I knew the Surah Yaseen by heart, I confirmed that I'd just completed it's full recitation the previous week (I think there was a bit of excitement about it because I was the first person in my class to do so, and I was really young at the time). So this man demanded I recite to the class. I began to do so, utterly terrified (I'm not a public speaker at the best of times), he let me recite about five lines before anouncing I was doing it incorrectly, then he beat the crap out of me with a stick, keeping in mind I was a tiny little girl at the time and I am built very slightly I had huge welts form the beating, and was made to stand in a corner! I never returned to Saturday class again, and to this day I detest the twat.

For the record there was no difference which I  can remember between my recitation and his, the entire class was horrified and terrified and none of the other children could ascertain what I had recited incorrectly, a few had been following my recitation along in the Quran.
I was taught the Quran by a qualified Aalimah, this man was not qualified at all. From what I remember he had his clear favourites who could do no wrong and he was resentful that I'd learnt something his favourite had not.

Thank goodness it didnt put me off wanting to learn the Quran.

As you can see, I've not forgotten the experience. Some 'teachers' really tried very hard to inspire a dislike for the attainment of knowledge!



Wassalaam

And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186
timbuktu
Guest
« Reply #9 on: Dec 16, 2008 11:32 AM »

peace be upon you

I must have been the luckiest one.

I was taught by both bee jee, (this is what we called elder ones with respect). She was a kind woman who taught children at her home.  I was also taught at a madrassa by qualified qaris. I do not remember ever being hit, or even seeing anyone being hit.

At school too we had religious education. In the missionary schools we were excused Bible classes, but we took classes in what they called "Good Manners". That was an interesting class. There was a character in a book of similar name. The character was called "Mrs. BeDoneWithAsYouDid", and she went around administering justice to children who had been naughty, doing to them exactly what they had done to others.

My madrassa was one of Jamiatul Ghurabae ahle Hadith, the nearest one to our flat. The Friday khutbas were fiery, but the maulvis were kind to us. I do not think we children were ever asked to move to the back.

When I hired qaris to teach my children at home, I realised that being a qari does not imply anything other than being able to read the Quran, and that too in vernacular pronuncation.

The last few years have seen more interest in the Quran, both in recitation and understanding, and the TV has also been teaching the correct way to pronounce the Arabic words.
BrKhalid
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 27
BrKhalid barely matters :(BrKhalid barely matters :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 1352



« Reply #10 on: Dec 17, 2008 06:09 AM »

Asalaamu Alaikum  bro
 

Quote
things like that could never happen in America.  but in Britain, really weird villagey stuff happens


Can't say I experienced anything like that but then again I didn't go to an archetypal sub continent Madrassah  Huh?




Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #11 on: Dec 17, 2008 07:46 PM »

Quote
In the first week that I was there, the teacher went mad and started beating a kid, and I happened to be sitting next to the kid getting beat, and when the teacher saw that I was looking at him in horror, he whippped out his stick and started beating me too. That was the most humiliating experience of my life!

It seems like this problem is of anger and repetition. Basically you get beat all the time from your teachers so when you get older you beat your children and it continues. So it reallyneeds to be outlawed completely. The teachers need to be educated on how to teach their children correctly. Hitting only teaches the child to hit and nothing else. This has been proven by studies.

In the sunday school in the USA I went to all the teachers were very nice where we learned to pray salah and read Qur'an. Alhumdulilah.
nuh
Guest
« Reply #12 on: Dec 18, 2008 11:32 AM »

As salaam alaikum.

I have never seen anything like this happen personally nor have I heard of it happening in any community masajid or musallah that I've attended.

On the authority of Abu Huraira (ra) that the Prophet (saws) said:

Whoever removes a worldly grief from a believer, Allah (Azza Wa Jall) will remove from him one of the griefs of the Day of Judgement. Whosoever alleviates [the lot of] a needy person, Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta'aalaa) will alleviate [his lot] in this world and the next. Whosoever shields a Muslim, Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta'aalaa) will shield him in this world and in the next. Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta'aalaa) will aid a slave [of His] so long as the slave aids his brother. Whosoever follows a path to seek knowledge therein, Allah (Azza wa Jall) will make easy for him a path to paradise. No people gather together in one of the houses of Allah (Azza Wa Jall), reciting the Book of Allah and studying it among themselves, but tranquility and peace descends upon them, mercy envelopes them, the angels surround them and Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta'aalaa) makes mention of them amoungst those who are with Him. And whosoever is slowed down by his actions will not be hastened forward by his lineage.

It was related by Imam Muslim in these words.

I will step in and help any child in distress inshallah.

nuh
 bro
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #13 on: Dec 21, 2008 04:19 PM »

From Telegraph:

Egyptian teacher to stand trial for murdering pupil whose homework was late
A teacher has gone on trial in Egypt on charges of beating to death an 11-year-old pupil for not doing his homework.
 

Last Updated: 7:17PM GMT 20 Dec 2008

Haitham Nabeel Abdelhamid, 23, is accused of beating Islam Badr Ibrahim with a ruler before taking him outside the class and hitting him savagely in the stomach.

The boy then collapsed in a faint and was taken to hospital - but he died of heart failure.

The attack, which took place in October at the Saad Othman primary school near the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria, caused national outrage in a country where people are already sceptical about the state.

While Egypt is known for a higher standard of development than many of its neighbours, the country suffers from a lack of resources in its teaching system: meaning inexperienced teachers are often put in charge of classes up to 100 strong.

With the eyes of the nation focused on the coming trial, Egypt's education minister is expected to take the stand in the witness box.

"The problem is the teaching and the teachers because they cannot find good teachers," said Islam's father, Amr Badr Ibrahim. "The minister of education should be the first person accused. How can he agree to let such a young man teach children?"

 

   
     
Tabriz
Sis
Jr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 7
Tabriz has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 54


« Reply #14 on: Dec 22, 2008 05:03 AM »

That teacher needs to be taught a lesson. He should be hit savegely in the stomach, just like he hit that child. Then he needs to be locked behind jail for life and have the keys thrown away! That's what I would want if it was my child that this happened to. What an animal.

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: