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Author Topic: Planning for a garden  (Read 2023 times)
Blessedgrandma
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« on: Jan 23, 2009 01:56 AM »


I've received a few seed catalogs and have started planning my garden.
It's amazing all the different types of cucumbers and tomatoes they have.
Lots of seeds veggies from other countries.
I know it's only January but is anyone else thinking ... garden!!!   yet?
Hard2Hit
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Taubah


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« Reply #1 on: Jan 23, 2009 10:38 AM »

Salaams,

Yeah, we are also planning to extend our garden this February.

Currently we have around 20 acres of sugarcane planted, we'll inshaAllah take it to 27 acres.

Vegitables aren't feasible because last time we planted some, our neighbors took most of em since its hard to fence such a huge garden.

In rest of the garden we have planted wheat, rice and cow-grazing (so you sisters are welcome to eat around)

Wasalam,
-farmers grandson

PS: In our backyard, we have just planted flowers though.

The knight doesn't wait when he's ill or has cancer brother, the knight fights on... He finds a strategy, changes tactics, and hits hard.
a_desert_rose
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« Reply #2 on: Jan 23, 2009 01:05 PM »

Assalamualaikum,

It's still too cold here for planting out but inshallah we'll start planting in pots soon. Last year was the first year we'd planted anything in the garden (we moved here about 4 years ago and it's taken us THAT long to sort out the back garden!) and we had quite a lot of peas, runner beans, french beans and carrots alhamdulillah. This year we're thinking of planting much more because now we've got an idea of the veggies that are easy to grow...the easiest ever were the peas and we had a great yield mashallah. I can't wait till warm weather!

Also need to sort out the front garden and plant some flower bulbs and seeds, it's a complete tip!

Wassalam
timbuktu
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« Reply #3 on: Jan 23, 2009 01:54 PM »

peace be upon you

Masha`Allah. You are lucky to be able to get so many veggies to grow in your garden. I have tried many times. SInce I always forget when to plant, I leave it to my gardener (so-called. Real gardeners are unaffordable, and provide him with fertiliser, seeds, whatever he wants. Of the eight or nine things he plants, only one does well. Does not even cover the cost of the input.
tq
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« Reply #4 on: Jan 23, 2009 05:12 PM »

Assalamo elikuim
Last year my husband planted cilantro,mint,green chillies. We used them through out the summer. This year he hasnt started yet but I am guessing may be next month he will start all the garden work.
Almost forgot, two years ago he planted some apple,peach(ofcours in GA you have too Smiley) and fig trees. We did get some fruits but not that many. Inshallah this year. My oldest planted a mango tree from its seed(ofcourse every desi should have one Smiley) It has grown a little bit Smiley

Wasalam
tq
Blessedgrandma
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« Reply #5 on: Jan 23, 2009 06:14 PM »

Assalamo elikuim
Last year my husband planted cilantro,mint,green chillies. We used them through out the summer. This year he hasnt started yet but I am guessing may be next month he will start all the garden work.
Almost forgot, two years ago he planted some apple,peach(ofcours in GA you have too Smiley) and fig trees. We did get some fruits but not that many. Inshallah this year. My oldest planted a mango tree from its seed(ofcourse every desi should have one Smiley) It has grown a little bit Smiley

Wasalam
tq
They say it is best to trim back fruit trees in their first 2 to 3 yrs to encourage root growth. Otherwise a lot of the plants energy will go toward growing upward. Didn't know if you knew that. You'll most likely see your best crop from the 4th year on.
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« Reply #6 on: Jan 23, 2009 07:20 PM »

Assalamo elikuim
Thanks Sr.BlessedGrandma I am not sure he knows this or not I will let him know- I am not into gardening (everything I plant or just buy dies Sad ).

Wasalam
tq
a_desert_rose
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« Reply #7 on: Jan 24, 2009 03:05 PM »

Assalamualaikum

We planted a cherry tree and a berry 'bush' (but looks more like a tree) last year and they're both striplings. When do you reckon we should start trimming them blessedgrandma?

bro.timbuktu, try planting stuff yourself again, the results are much more satisfying! Do you plant directly into the soil or in plant pots first? I remember last year, I planted coriander seeds in trays and planted them out when they were about 5 cm, and they were just ravaged by ants.

Wassalam

a_desert_rose
timbuktu
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« Reply #8 on: Jan 24, 2009 03:52 PM »

peace be upon you

I guess you are right, I should do something myself.

20 years ago I dug really deep into difficult piece of land behind my house, and planted 3 guava trees, 3 kachnars, one pomegranate, 3 lemon saplings from pots. And that was the first time I did such hard work. They all prospered.  I also planted mango and dates. They came up but the cold killed them. Not a fruit tree, but I planted three Eucalyptus saplings, and they grew beautifully. Then when the municipality built a road in that piece of land, two Eucalyptus trees came in the way The last one I removed myself because I realized Eucalyptus drinks up too much underground water.

I love kachnar buds cooked by dilliwalas with peas and meat. But I had to have the trees cut down as it gave off some powder like substance that caused me asthma. The guava yield has been high, but the fruit has larvae in them when it ripens. The last remaining lemon have given fantastic yields but last season all the buds died off, and the tree too started dying. The trunk has now been cut to one foot and there is a fresh branch coming up. The pomegranate was beautiful, but the fruit was stolen every year before ripening. I did not get to sample a single one. Then the tree died. We had planted a curry leaf plant, and it was doing fine until it also died. Fortunately we detected two or three baby plants, and one is now growing.

I think the earth is infested with termites. I had my house and surroundings treated but it seems the treatment does not kill the termites, it just spreads a thin layer of oil over the wet soil underneath the surface, and the termites find a weak spot and come up again.

There is a leechee bush in the front lawn now, but the fruit there suffers the same fate as the pomegranate. Not a single leechee has been tasted by us.

Most veggies I plant directly. For some, particularly  when I haven't planted in time, I buy the plant in pots. The pilferage of veggies also continues, whenever I plant them.
Blessedgrandma
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« Reply #9 on: Jan 25, 2009 04:21 AM »

Sisters, I prune the fruit trees and the roses in Feb, it is best in late winter.
Pruning also makes a huge difference on shape and productivity (of fruit and buds for flowers)
Here are some web sites that may help.
I have always been taught to prune fruit trees down the fiirst 2 years to allow the trees strength to go into the root.
Topping them so they don't get out of hand is best, fruit you can't reach doesn't do any good and only rots, falls off, although
I have had a ton of birds eating this winter what I didn't pick or couldn't reach and what froze up.
But best to prune so the fruit each year is reachable.
I made some YUMMY apple sauce this fall. And I got quite a bit of hazelnuts this fall, I love the way the house
smells when I'm roasting/bking them.

Here are the sites, pruning is important and theres more to it than just going out and chopping branches.

http://www.essortment.com/hobbies/growcareapple_spzq.htm

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/175926/how_to_care_for_a_young_tree.html

http://gardening.about.com/b/2007/02/28/pruning-apple-trees.htm

http://www.lawn-and-gardening-tips.com/fruit-tree-pruning-instructions.html

http://www.essortment.com/hobbies/growcareapple_spzq.htm
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