Madinat al-Muslimeen Community

Apr 20, 2014 09:28 AM
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length


Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Through the eyes of a Muslimah  (Read 990 times)
Rehmat
Bro
Newbie
*

Reputation Power: 0
Rehmat is not to be trusted!
Posts: 49


« on: Feb 11, 2009 09:12 PM »


Women struggle for better rights have been as old as the mankind. They have been persecuted and put-down in every man-made religions, cults and pagan culture-based western societies. Even to this day - the western champions of “women freedom” among Muslim societies - are not ashamed to treat women as nothing but a sex object (prostitution), most of which is based on the Judeo-Christian Scriptures. In India’s Hindu culture, hundreds of thousands of women population is destroyed through abortion.

It was Islam, which liberated women in almost every field of their lives, over 1400 years ago. In Islam, the equality among two genders is not based on physical aspects but in piety, marriage, divorce, education, business, social, and political fields.

In the political arena, where the so-called “civilized world nations” like the US, France, Australia, etc. still have to elect (or select) a women to be the head of “the Executive” - Muslim countries like Pakistan, Turkey, Bangladesh, and Indonesia have elected women as their rulers. In fact, Bangladesh has been ruled by two ladies for more than two decades and the current prime minister of the country is a woman, Husina Mujeeb.

However, the anti-Islam Zionist-controlled western mass media is never known for good moral ethics when it comes to reporting on Islam and Muslims in general. When it comes to religious dictatorship (though Israel being the only occupation created on religion in the modern times) or nuclear threat or women rights - pro-Israeli media rants always end at Islamic Iran. For example, a few days ago the Zionist media reported Iran\’s women fight for rights 30 years after revolution - trying to project the image that women under Islamic law have less human rights than their sisters in the West - while shamefully admitting that 60% of university students, now, are female and even women are allowed to drive taxi-cabs. While ranting the usual anti-Islam bigotry - the article miss to mention that Islamic Iran is the only among 57 Muslim nation states, where elections have been held every four years since Islamic Revolution (1979) - even during 8-year Iraq-Iran War and none of country’s elected presidents has been allowed to hold his power more than two-terns (8 year) as allowed under the Constitution - and that for the last twelve year - a women has held the position of Vice-president.

Interestingly, an atheist Iranian woman, Azar Majedi, who campaigned against even partial application of Islamic Shari’ah on matters related to inheritance and divorce for Muslim Canadian citizen - is projected as a Muslim women right expert by Jewish FrontPage Magazine.

Contrary to Azar Majedi or Canada’s lesbian Islamic reformer Irshad Manji - William Beeman and Zara Houshman in Pacific News Service, Feb. 27, 2001 paid tributes to Muslimahs in Iran and the rest of Muslim world. William wrote: “No place in the Islamic world has been more stigmatized for its treatment of women than Iran. But on the recent trip there - my first in many years - my greatest surprise was the clear evidence that Iranian women are better off todat than they were under the Shah.

The Islamic Republic has emphysized women equality in education, employment, and political as matter of national pride. Although Iranian women have served in Iranian legislature and as government ministers since the 1950s, more women make up the current parliament than under the Pahlavi regime…..More than 75% of population is under age of 25 - well over 90% of men and women are literate (as compared to world’s richest country, the US, where more than 15% Americans cannot read or write) even in rural areas.

Many older, westernized women decry any restriction on their dress, but younger women who grew up in Islamic Republic take it in stride. “I View it a kind of work uniform. I am far more concerned about press restrictions than the dress code,” claimed one female journalist.”

http://rehmat1.wordpress.com/2009/02/11/though-the-eyes-of-a-muslimah/


Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: