Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: health topic - vitamin D  (Read 2893 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
um aboodi
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 26
um aboodi barely matters :(um aboodi barely matters :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 606



« on: Feb 18, 2009 10:39 PM »


salam

So I thought to post something health related here.  Not sure if there is a proper forum, I will gladly post there if there is.

So, people who live above the 40 degree latitude line are all deficient in Vitamin D during the winter months (Nov to Mar). The UV-B rays of the sun are not "strong" enough during these winter months to allow synthesis of vitamin D in our skin.

See, we have this photosynthetic mechanism that allow us to convert cholesterol in the skin to make vitamin D.  A 10 minute exposure of face and hands to the summer sun can stimulate the synthesis of 10 micrograms vitamin D in a caucasian individual.  People with darker pigmented skin need more time as the melanin in their skin filters out the UV-B rays.   For this synthesis to occur, UV-B rating has to be 3 or more, indicating moderate conditions.

Use of sunscreen in the winter is useless.  In the summer, sensible exposure to sun to make vitamin D should be a priority.  Maybe after a certain "dose" of exposure we can put on our sun screen.

So why do we need vitamin D?  Well, the most important function of vitamin D is that it enhances absorption of Calcium from our digestive system.  So vitamin D is important for maintaining a good calcium balance in our system and for bone health.  Kids who don't get enough vitamin D develop rickets where their legs bones become bowed and curved.  Adults who are deficient in vitamin D have "soft bones" due to inability of bones to mineralize.

Doctors don't usually have an idea of the vitamin D status of people, because the test for vitamin D is slightly complicated .  So this does not get tested in the normal check up. Although if you ask  your doctor, s/he may order a vitamin D test for you. It is just a blood sample.
 
The importance of vitamin D goes beyond bone health.  It is important for the immune system  and there are many studies that link vitamin D deficiency to an increased risk of breast, colon, and other cancers.  I can post articles if people are interested. 

So do invest in buying a vitamin D supplement especially those who live in N. america, but also others living in other areas.  The most rich food in vitamin D is fish liver oil, and taking this can obviate the need for supplements.  I personally take supplements. 

check out this link for some info
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081216161058.htm
   
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 279
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7144


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #1 on: Feb 21, 2009 12:43 AM »

this is a related article... guess we should be taking vitamin D along with C and probably a multivitamin everyday... vitamins make me sick however so not sure what i should do.. someone told me to get childrens vitamins but they all have gelatin!! i heard dr. oz say on oprah that ppl should break vitamins in half and take one in the morning and one at night.. sounds interesting.. J.

===

Does modest dress among Arab-American women promote vitamin D deficiency?


By Jordan Lite | Scientific American

Vitamin D is the vitamin du jour these days, with many doctors urging more sun exposure following years of campaigns advising us to cover up and use sunscreen to prevent skin cancer. Many of us, especially in cloudier areas, don’t get enough of the sunshine vitamin. The elderly and post-menopausal women are more at risk for deficiency, as are those who live in northern climes.

But today comes news that one group seems to be at particular risk, doctors report in the journal Endocrine Practice. Arab-American women who wore the hijab (a Koran-derived dress code that includes a scarf or veil over their hair and modest dress) and didn’t get enough vitamin D through their diet had half the levels of the vitamin of those who didn’t adhere as closely to the dress code. There was no difference in rates of health problems linked to vitamin D deficiency, such as bone or joint pain or breaks, or muscle weakness. The study involved 87 women in Dearborn, Mich., which has a large Arab population.

The more conservatively the women dressed, the lower their vitamin D; those who wore the hijab but ate vitamin D-rich foods such as milk or oily fish had higher levels, though not as high as the women who didn’t adhere to hijab. A measure of 30 nanograms per milliliter of blood is considered sufficient; the most conservatively dressed women in the study had levels as low as 4.5, but even those who didn’t wear the hijab and got some vitamin D in their diets had an average level of 8.5 — “and that’s still low,” says co-author Raymond Hobbs, a senior staff physician Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

“We’re not trying to get anyone to take off their hijab,” Hobbs tells ScientificAmerican.com, but “to do things to prevent problems that might arise” from the tradition. The vitamin was once thought to be necessary only to prevent rickets (soft bones) in childhood and osteoporosis later on, but now, vitamin D deficiency is associated with diabetes, cancer, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, heart disease and infections.

The study isn’t the first to link style of dress to vitamin D deficiency, which affects an estimated 1 billion people around the world. A study published in Pediatrics in 2000 found that ultra-Orthodox Jewish children in Brooklyn who are covered up year-round in long sleeves and dresses were vitamin D deficient. Studies in sunny climes (including Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Australia, Turkey, India, and Lebanon) where people may be covered up for religious or other reasons, also found that 30 percent to 50 percent of adults and kids were vitamin D-deficient, according to a 2007 review in the New England Journal of Medicine.

While heavy doses of vitamin D are available in supplements, the body manufacturers the most through sun exposure (admittedly in short supply in early spring in Michigan, when the study was done), Hobbs says. The vitamin naturally occurs in only a few foods, including mackerel, tuna, salmon and eggs, and it’s added to milk in the U.S. To get the recommended 1,000 International Units of vitamin D a day (or no more than 2,000), you’d have to drink 20 glasses of milk daily, or eat 80 eggs, Hobbs says. Spend a few minutes in the sunshine, though, and your body will make 10,000 to 20,000 units, he says.
timbuktu
Guest
« Reply #2 on: Feb 21, 2009 07:13 AM »

peace be upon you

Oils and fats contain vitamin D, which is added to many synthetics and preparations, including margarine. In the UK Calcium used to be added to wheat flour, together with vitamin D. I do not know the practice today. Carrots are a good source, too. I do not think that the lack of sunshine should be a problem. Most offices and increasing number of homes have fluorescent lights, which also give out uv. You can also buy uv lamps, which are not expensive. But be careful with overexposure.
rahma
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 73
rahma has a powerful personality :)rahma has a powerful personality :)rahma has a powerful personality :)rahma has a powerful personality :)rahma has a powerful personality :)rahma has a powerful personality :)rahma has a powerful personality :)
Gender: Female
Posts: 543



« Reply #3 on: Feb 22, 2009 01:41 PM »

Quote
the most conservatively dressed women in the study had levels as low as 4.5, but even those who didn’t wear the hijab and got some vitamin D in their diets had an average level of 8.5 — “and that’s still low,”

So, even the women who don't wear hijab have a low level....  That would indicate that something else is to blame, not the hijab....No?

jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 279
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7144


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #4 on: Feb 22, 2009 10:46 PM »

ws,

I think this issue is a valid and important one for us to consider especially in western countries. Life is just not designed for hijabis in the west. The only time we get to take off our hijab is well inside and sometimes if we have in laws living with us not even then. Back in muslim countries the houses are designed with courtyards and open areas, the backyards are private, women have a lot more access to the outdoors. Even separate bathing areas on the beach, or at least access for Muslim women. I don't know any Muslim woman in the west who would venture to beaches with all the nekkid people Wink so it's definitely something we should try to find solutions for.

timbuktu
Guest
« Reply #5 on: Feb 23, 2009 06:49 AM »

peace be upon you

Quote
the most conservatively dressed women in the study had levels as low as 4.5, but even those who didn’t wear the hijab and got some vitamin D in their diets had an average level of 8.5 — “and that’s still low,”

So, even the women who don't wear hijab have a low level....  That would indicate that something else is to blame, not the hijab....No?

No, because if the study is correct, look at the picture quantitatavely. 4.5 for the hijabis, 8.5 for the non-hijabis. As jananh said, a solution has to be found.
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #6 on: Feb 23, 2009 07:09 AM »

But Jannah it looks like this study was also done in the Muslim countries
Quote
Studies in sunny climes (including Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Australia, Turkey, India, and Lebanon) where people may be covered up for religious or other reasons, also found that 30 percent to 50 percent of adults and kids were vitamin D-deficient, according to a 2007 review in the New England Journal of Medicine.

salaam
um aboodi
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 26
um aboodi barely matters :(um aboodi barely matters :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 606



« Reply #7 on: Feb 23, 2009 09:50 AM »

salam

Thanks for posting the article jannah.  Life style adjustments are  really important for maintaining healthy vitamin D levels. 

Many women in saudi arabia and UAE are deficient because they don't spend time in the sun any more. In the old days, the houses ,as jannah mentioned,  used to have  court yards and there  was more exposure to the sun.  Now everyone lives indoors.  Don't forget too  that darker pigmented skin requires more time in the sun to induce synthesis of adequate levels of vitamin D.

wassalam


 
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 279
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7144


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #8 on: Feb 23, 2009 10:11 AM »

ws

so interesting...  and u know what i bet a big factor in all this is tooo... WHITE SKIN... the lighter you are in those countries (even in the US) the more attractive people think you are. so i'm sure all those women stay out of the sun as much as possible and make their daughters not play outside in case they 'TURN TOO DARK'!
Fozia
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 124
Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 2663



« Reply #9 on: Feb 23, 2009 10:48 AM »

salam


This is so wierd, I asked my doctor when pregnant with my eldest and she said I'd get the Vitamin D I needed fine despite wearing hijab and abayah, she said baby and I would be fine I did not need to lie out in the sun as that would be damaging not beneficial.

She reckoned the Vitamins I required would be easily abnsorbed by the small amount of time I do spend out of doors and the amount of flesh I expose was adequate for that, nobody telling me to get nekkid here, thank goodness!

I'm also assuming that there are prolly small amounts of the vitamin added in daily foods or absorbed from natural sources eg fruits, vegetables or meat which mean eating a varied diet will ensure one has the vitamins one needs.....

Actually this reminds me of a student we have, he's in his late twenties (so I  had a slight sympathy failure). When he started his course his maintenance cheque was paid in dollars which takes about two weeks to clear an english bank account, on day two of his arrival, his loud and hysterical mother made a long and ranty call to one of our co-ordinaters the gist of the (very long) shouty (her end) conversation being 'But my son needs his vitamins what about his vitamins......??' I surpressed the urge to snap back that he could get as many vitamins as he needed for a fiver in Boots....Just how many vitamins do Americans take a day anyway? Do you guys not rattle when you walk from all those pills, or do we just end up with the ones with bizarre vitamin requirements?


Wassalaam

And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186
rahma
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 73
rahma has a powerful personality :)rahma has a powerful personality :)rahma has a powerful personality :)rahma has a powerful personality :)rahma has a powerful personality :)rahma has a powerful personality :)rahma has a powerful personality :)
Gender: Female
Posts: 543



« Reply #10 on: Feb 23, 2009 02:13 PM »

Quote
Quote from: rahma on Feb 22, 08:41 AM
Quote
the most conservatively dressed women in the study had levels as low as 4.5, but even those who didn’t wear the hijab and got some vitamin D in their diets had an average level of 8.5 — “and that’s still low,”

So, even the women who don't wear hijab have a low level....  That would indicate that something else is to blame, not the hijab....No?

No, because if the study is correct, look at the picture quantitatavely. 4.5 for the hijabis, 8.5 for the non-hijabis. As jananh said, a solution has to be found.

Assalaamu Alaykum brother timbuktu.

I was just pointing out that whether it's 4.5 or 8.5, out of 30 being acceptable, they are both low.  So non-hijabis are also way deficient.  After reading jannah's reply, I wonder if that's the problem (people don't want their girls to get "too dark" Roll Eyes)
timbuktu
Guest
« Reply #11 on: Feb 23, 2009 02:38 PM »

peace be upon you

Women in gereral tend to be low on many essentials, like hoemoglobin, for instance. Maybe they do not care enough about all the requirements. My wife, although a medical doctor, is totally oblivious to dietary requirements. Plus there is a cultural culture of sacrifice for those they supposedly love. I eat a lot by myself, and she puts a major portion of the food she takes out in my plate as well. It is Allah's Grace that I have had a high metabolic rate, or I would have died of overeating.

Such sacrifice, if you can call it that, is definitely true of the cubsub-continent.

Another reason for vitamin deficiency would be that this vitamin is destroyed very easily by heat, hence cooking can remove it from food altogether. It is not soluble in water, and a reduced intake of oils/fats (for fear of cholestrol) may also be to blame.
um aboodi
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 26
um aboodi barely matters :(um aboodi barely matters :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 606



« Reply #12 on: Feb 23, 2009 10:19 PM »

salam

rahma, you are right there is another factor, that made all the women - not just the hijabis- low in vitamin D.  It is the lack of sun.  The study was conducted in the early spring, when UV-B rays are not as strong, and also people are still wearing more covering clothes.

So, the hijab seems to inhibit vitamin D synthesis  even more.

What we and everyone needs to do is to take supplements.  And don't forget to take calcium too.

 jannah, you are completely right. I never thought about it from this angle , but this makes lots  of sense. Women avoid sun like the plague in the middle east because they don't want to get dark skin.

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: