Peace be upon you,
    Welcome to Madinat Al-Muslimeen, the City of the Muslims. Please feel free to visit the different hot spots around the Madina and post any discussion, articles, suggestions, comments, art, poetry, events, recipes, etc etc. Basically anything you would like to share with your sisters and brothers!! Non-muslims are also of course quite welcome to share their comments. If this is your first time here, you need to register with the city council. Once you register you have 15 days to post your mandatory introduction and then you will be upgraded to a Madina Citizen, God Willing. Please note that our city does have regulations which are listed in the city constitution. Read them carefully before moving in. P.S. - You can also post anonymously if you wish. P.S.S. - Also be sure to check out our ARCHIVES from 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 & 2007. :)

Random Quote: The hypocrite looks for faults; the believer looks for excuses. - Abu Hamid al-Ghazali
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Honour suicides  (Read 534 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
salaampeaceshalom
Sis
Full Member
*

Reputation Power: 2
salaampeaceshalom has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 166



« on: Mar 27, 2009 09:27 AM »



http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/women-told-you-have-dishonoured-your-family-please-kill-yourself-1655373.html

'Women are told: 'You have dishonoured your family, please kill yourself'
By Ramita Navai in Batman, eastern Turkey
Friday, 27 March 2009


When Elif's father told her she had to kill herself in order to spare him from a prison sentence for her murder, she considered it long and hard. "I loved my father so much, I was ready to commit suicide for him even though I hadn't done anything wrong," the 18-year-old said. "But I just couldn't go through with it. I love life too much."


All Elif had done was simply decline the offer of an arranged marriage with an older man, telling her parents she wanted to continue her education. That act of disobedience was seen as bringing dishonour on her whole family – a crime punishable by death. "I managed to escape. When I was at school, a few girls I knew were killed by their families in the name of honour – one of them for simply receiving a text message from a boy," Elif said.

So-called "honour killings" in Turkey have reached record levels. According to government figures, there are more than 200 a year – half of all the murders committed in the country. Now, in a sinister twist, comes the emergence of "honour suicides". The growing phenomenon has been linked to reforms to Turkey's penal code in 2005. That introduced mandatory life sentences for honour killers, whereas in the past, killers could receive a reduced sentence claiming provocation. Soon after the law was passed, the numbers of female suicides started to rocket.

Elif has spent the past eight months on the run, living in hiding and in fear. Her uncles and other relatives are looking to hunt her down, for dishonour is seen as a stain that can only be cleansed by death. One of the women's shelters where Elif has stayed has been raided by armed family members.

Elif is from Batman, a grey, bleak town in the south-east of Turkey nicknamed "Suicide City". Three quarters of all suicides here are committed by women – nearly everywhere else in the world, men are three times more likely to kill themselves. "I think most of these suicide cases are forced. There are just too many of them, it's too suspicious. But they're almost impossible to investigate," said Mustafa Peker, Batman's chief prosecutor.

Wearing tight clothes or talking to a man who is not a relative is sometimes all it takes to blacken the family name. Mr Peker said women who are told to kill themselves are usually given one of three options – a noose, a gun or rat poison. They are then locked in a room until the job is done.

A woman's fate is usually decided during a "family council", when the extended family meets to discuss breaches of honour. In these meetings, it is agreed how the victim must be killed. If it is not to be a forced suicide, a killer is chosen. The youngest member of the family is often ordered to kill, in the belief they will be treated more leniently if caught.

Mehmet was 17 when he was handed a gun and told he would have to kill his stepmother and her lover. "I didn't want to do it. I was so young and so scared," he said. Mehmet ran away, but his family tracked him down and warned him his own life would be in danger if he refused to kill.

He shot dead his stepmother's lover, but his stepmother survived the attack. He was given a two-and-a-half- year prison sentence.

"There were many other 'honour killers' in prison and we were treated with respect, even by the prison guards," Mehmet said.

Most honour killings happen in the Kurdish region, a barren land ravaged by years of war and oppression. Rural communities here are ruled under a strict feudal, patriarchal system. But as Kurds have fled the fighting between separatist rebels and Turkey's government, the crime is spreading across the country into its cities and towns. According to a recent government report, there is now one honour killing a week in Istanbul.

"Families who move here are suddenly faced with modern, secular Turkey," said Vildan Yirmibesoglu, the head of Istanbul's department of human rights. "This clash of cultures is making the situation worse as the pressure on women to behave conservatively is become more acute. And of course there are more temptations."

Ms Yirmibesoglu believes that the entrenched belief in the notion of honour – at all levels of society – is impeding any progress. "Honour killings aren't always properly investigated because some police and prosecutors share the same views as the honour killers," she said. "For things to change, police, prosecutors and even judges need to be educated on gender equality."


'If he woke up and had enough food for the day and shelter (a roof over his head) and he does not fear for his safety, then it is as if he has been given the dunya.'
UBAB
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
UBAB has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 614


2 [agree] or not 2 [disagree]-that is the question


WWW
« Reply #1 on: Mar 27, 2009 03:18 PM »

I heard some brothers and sisters talk about something similar to this in Chicago back in 1999 who were from the Inner-City Muslim Action Network (IMAN). They visiting Toronto for the Ramadan Deen Intensive Program and they were a still a fairly new organization at that time.

During the rDIP,. Sheikh Adhemi had a sisters only sesssion where the sisters talked about the problems happening in the community. The 30 minute session lasted over 2 hours with the Sheikh breaking down in tears for a long time during this session because of what he was hearing.
At the end of the session - Sheikh Adhemi brought the brothers into the hall and challenged them to find the problems of the sisters and to solve them. basically to be real men.

Back to IMAN ...

Like most organizations, the brothers and sisters of organizations never really talked. What came out of this sisters only session what that the sisters approached the brothers and told them what was happening in their community in Chicago. I wish I could ask them, but I didn't want to intrude, as they were talking in front of me. The summary of it was an incident where an university aged sister threw herself in front of a commuter train in chicago a few weeks or months before the event and I think she died - the brothers did not know the reason why she did it (the root cause) that until the others sisters told them at this event. This was the turning point of their organization and they vow to work together to protect sisters from that root cause and provide services to help sisters who were affected by this root cause. I didn't ask them what that root cause was, but, according to the other sisters, this girl killed herself to protect her family's honour/honor.

Your heart will not truly open until you understand Surah 21 : Verse 92  (Al-Anbiya: The Prophets)

Help Build the Community! Visit:
Madinat al-Muslimeen > The City > Naseeha Corner > Community Toolbox
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #2 on: Mar 27, 2009 08:25 PM »

salaam

wow once a wk that is serious stuff. So the gov is putting these men in jail, but only for two years???/ Maybe if they put a lifetime sentence that would make a statemnt.  It sounds like many girls who committied 'suicide' probably really didnt but it was made to look that way. So how can the government stop the sucicide?  Tribal counceling?  Education?  Islamic education, Islamic scholars ?
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #3 on: Mar 27, 2009 08:37 PM »

this happens, happened in Chicago also??
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: