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Author Topic: The Halal Creams That Let Muslim Faces Glow  (Read 3297 times)
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« on: Aug 10, 2009 10:13 AM »


Asalaamu Alaikum  bro


A nice enterprising business story from someone who moved to several countries!!


I would have posted in the Sister’s section but we all know the growing numbers of men using skin creams……  Wink





The Halal creams that let Muslim faces glow


DUBAI // As a freelance make-up artist, Layla Mandi was shocked to discover three years ago that many cosmetics contain animal residues, including pig products. Since then, she has spent her time developing her own halal skin care range.

Now a self-employed businesswoman, Miss Mandi, 32, hopes to fill what she sees as a gap in the cosmetics industry for Muslim women in the region.

“I am providing a service to women who want an alternative,” she said. “Some people don’t care what is in their skin products or how they are produced, but for those who do I think there should be options.”

Miss Mandi, a Muslim convert, started her make-up career in her native Canada when she was 17. At the time she was surrounded by Muslim families and she started exploring the Islamic faith.

As the years passed and she became more adept in her field, she began to look beyond the labels of the products she was using every day, and realised that the ingredients of many creams, lotions and make-up items did not fit with her idea of Islam.

In many brands she found animal by-products such as blood, urine, fats, gelatine from horns and hooves, swine placenta and stearic acid, a fatty substance derived from the stomach lining, often of pigs.


People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (Peta), the international animal rights organisation, confirmed the use of these substances in its consumer’s guide to living, which says: “Slaughterhouses must dispose of the by-products of billions of animals every year. The solution is selling them to food and cosmetics manufacturers.”

Also, unless specified otherwise the fats in glycerine, keratin and collagen, all commonly found in cosmetics, are from tallow, which is produced at animal rendering plants where carcases are ground down and melted to extract the residual fat.

“When I read all of this I found it disgusting,” said Miss Mandi. “I certainly did not want to put it on my skin where it would get absorbed into my body. I wanted to find an alternative.”

In 2006, she moved to Morocco to find out more about Islam and the lifestyle of Muslims.

“I assumed, just as in the food sector, there would be plenty of halal cosmetics for Muslim women. But I suddenly realised there were none,” she said.

“In fact, people either didn’t know or didn’t care that the cream they were putting on their face had pig and other animal derivatives in it. I decided to try to make my own.”

The following year Miss Mandi moved to Dubai to research the shopping habits of Arab and Muslim women, and to develop her products she hired a chemist and a dermatologist in Canada.


“It felt natural for me to pursue this,” she said. “Skin products are my passion. I love moisturiser; it makes my skin feel better, look better I love the packaging and the way things feel and smell.

“My way of life as a Muslim was also really important to me, so to find something which combined the two was great.”

Halal cosmetics are not a new idea. According to The Halal Journal, approximately US$150 million (Dh551m) worth of halal products pass through the UAE every year, a large proportion being cosmetics and personal care items. But they are not readily available to consumers. At the Halal Expo 2008, Raees Ahmed, the director of the event’s organising company, said there was “an excellent opportunity for halal cosmetics players to take advantage of the booming demand.”

A recent survey by KasehDia Research Consulting, the company that organises the World Halal Forum in Malaysia, said 57.6 per cent of Muslims in Singapore and 37.7 per cent in Indonesia, both emerging markets, were aware of halal cosmetics and would buy them if they were available.

Ahmad Azudin, senior manager for halal standards and systems at the International Halal Integrity Alliance (IHI) in Malaysia, said: “There is a growing demand for these products and an increasing awareness with consumers about animal contamination.

“It is not just the porcine products that cause a problem for Muslims. There are a lot of lipsticks that contain blood, which is considered also impure.”

In response, Mr Azudin and his team are working on implementing an international halal standard for cosmetics by the end of next year.

“It is one of 10 areas we are focusing on,” he said. “We are developing production standards for skin care, hair care, oral products and fragrance in compliance with the Sharia board at the IHI.

“There will be strict guidelines to follow and this will give confidence to all consumers.”

Mr Ahmad added that halal products were also becoming popular with non-Muslim buyers.

“They are clean, wholesome and there are no impurities that go into the manufacturing process. Everyone, not just Muslims, likes the idea of that,” he said.

Consumer opinion in the UAE was mixed as to whether using products with animal derivatives was haram.

“I’m of the opinion that if you are not eating it, it is OK,” said Anisa Alkos, a full-time mother living in Abu Dhabi. Obviously I’d rather not put anything on my body that contained pig fat, but there is nothing to make it clear.”

In the May issue of last year’s Halal Journal, Kamarul Kamaruzaman, its managing editor, wrote that “due to its biological similarities to human placenta and its excellent skin healing properties, swine placenta is considered to be the darling of the cosmetics industry”.

Some Islamic scholars, he wrote, cited the change of state of the product, or istihala in Arabic, as the central argument for accepting the use of gelatine and cosmetics.

However, according to the mufti at the official fatwa call centre of the UAE, pork products in any state are “absolutely haram”.

“Everything from the pig is rejected,” he said. “We can’t eat it, buy it, sell it, wear the leather or even touch the animal.

“It is nejes [dirty or impure] and we can’t use it on our body, a person will then not be in a state of purity fit to pray.”

Hanna Jaffer, 25, is one consumer who said she would be changing her habits for good.

“I was shocked when I heard how they make skin creams. I don’t think it will be OK to use, however much it is sanitised or changes form,” she said.

“Our religion disallows it and from now on I will only be using halal products.”

Miss Mandi’s One Pure Skin Care range will go on sale at the 50 Degrees boutique in the Souk Al Bahar in Dubai, on Saudi Arabian Airlines and online at the start of Ramadan later this month.

Although her products, which include eye cream, moisturiser, cleanser and toner, were initially certified by the Malaysian authorities, they are now being produced and given halal certification in Italy.

http://www.thenational.ae/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090810/NATIONAL/708099832/1010

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« Reply #1 on: Aug 10, 2009 10:49 AM »

Quote
I would have posted in the Sister’s section but we all know the growing numbers of men using skin creams…… 


Aha! How true.  That really made me laugh!

Quote
“It is one of 10 areas we are focusing on,” he said. “We are developing production standards for skin care, hair care, oral products and fragrance in compliance with the Sharia board at the IHI.

Key word in the above sentence for me is 'oral'.  During my visit to the US this past March, my cousin sister told me that Colgate Toothpaste is not halal.  I use Colgate.

As for cosmetics, I am not that much of a user of beauty products except for body lotions/creams, facial cleansers, hand lotion/creams, etc.  But it would certainly be great if all beauty products are halal.  My fear is that unscrupulous manufacturers will jump onto the halal need of beauty products and just label theirs halal when in fact they will not be.  After all, if we are using products that are not halal and can not tell, how will we be able to figure out merchandise labelled 'halal' for commercial purposes?

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« Reply #2 on: Aug 10, 2009 10:22 PM »

Quote

My fear is that unscrupulous manufacturers will jump onto the halal need of beauty products and just label theirs halal when in fact they will not be.  After all, if we are using products that are not halal and can not tell, how will we be able to figure out merchandise labeled 'halal' for commercial purposes?

We definitely need a set of standards and also halal authorizing body or organizations that can investigate to find out if a product is really halal or not. Same thing for restaurants, sometimes I really wonder if the food is halal or not, but if they had a sign 'authorized halal by new york halal mosques' or something it would be much better.
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« Reply #3 on: Aug 12, 2009 03:37 AM »

Related article:

Point to ponder: How genuine is halal stamp?
Sarah Abdullah | Arab News
 

JEDDAH: Exhibitors at the recent Halal Expo 2008 reportedly closed more than SR41.2 million ($11 million) worth of deals over the course of the three-day event and successfully ushered in a number of international players into the region’s Halal market, which is already worth an estimated SR7.8 trillion.

Products being negotiated for potential import into the Kingdom and the GCC region include snacks, vegetable oils, dairy products, health foods, fruit juices and meat products stamped with the halal signature.

However, many international companies — in accordance with plans for global expansion and to stay financially afloat in the current financial crisis — are using the halal industry to get an edge on their competitors without using or even being correctly educated on methods of Islamic slaughter.

“Ninety-five percent of American food items found in supermarket shelves in the UAE and other GCC countries are not halal even though they may be certified as such,” said Jalel Aossey, director of Midamar, a US-based international food supplier and one of the first Muslim– owned business groups to offer halal food and food-service equipment to North America since 1974.

Aossey, who was speaking at the Halal World Expo, said there is a significant flow of non-halal food items entering the local region especially from meat-supplying countries. He added that Gulf countries need tougher regulations to stop the flow.

Corrupt certifiers, he said, are also to blame for the problem as they get a taste for the money generated producing halal certificates for companies without actually performing any work. He added that he advises countries such as the UAE and Saudi Arabia to send inspectors to food producing countries to ensure proper halal standards are being upheld.

“This is nothing when you consider the huge dollar volume of food products exported to Gulf countries,” he said.

In November 2000, Mohammed Mazhar Husseini, co-founder and former executive director of Islamic Food and Nutrition Council of America (IFANCA), a major halal certifying body in North America that is widely accepted as providing quality certification by many Muslim countries including Saudi Arabia, officially put in his resignation to the organization that he helped create nearly 30 years ago.

“They (IFANCA) are interested in charging fees and certifying products (as halal) and getting commission,” he said in an interview with Sound Vision, an Islamic information website.

Husseini noted that in earlier years the organization was more education-oriented and community based in offering workshops and organizing seminars on Halal food issues, something that no longer takes place. Offering more insight into the practices creating problems in the halal food industry, a book published in 2003 by Mian Riaz and Muhammad Chaudry, entitled “Halal Food Production,” agrees that a number of the products that international companies are marketing as Halal are not as permissible as one might think.

“To speed up production time, some halal slaughterhouses have begun using an integrated approach to traditional, Islamically-recognized handslaughtering,” the authors of the book said.

One method mentioned is the mechanical or machine slaughtering approach, which was first initiated by slaughterhouses in Western countries and which has gained momentum as being acceptable in other Muslim countries such as Malaysia, Indonesia, and Singapore.

The method consists of a Muslim pronouncing the name of Allah as he switches on a machine that inserts a cut into an animal’s neck. The problem, however, according to the authors, is that up to 30 percent of the initial incisions made to the animal by the machine does not accurately go all the way through in killing the animal the first time. There is, therefore, a second Muslim butcher standing by to re-cut the neck to conclude the procedure, causing undo suffering to the animal. The book also stated that some non-Muslim companies who are diversifying their product lines to include halal products have got round certain Islamic procedures to gain certification. “Some companies have been found to use a recording of a Muslim pronouncing the name of Allah before the butcher proceeds with slaughter,” it said.

Not only are corrupt certification methods going on in Western countries but also in the Middle Eastern and African regions, said a local businessman who asked to be anonymous. He said he once imported sheep from South Africa and although the certifying body knew that the animals were not slaughtered according to proper Islamic procedure issued a halal certification and sold the animals to him.

“I brought close to 150 sheep and wanted them slaughtered and shipped here to Jeddah for sale,” he said. “In order to speed the process of certification I offered him a bonus on top of the regular fees and was automatically issued Halal documents for export that moment,” he said.

“I do not completely rely on the certification saying that meats from abroad are halal since I recently received a package of pork meat with the halal certification documents included in the box which I thought was beef which I had ordered from Brazil,” said a meat importer based in the UAE.

“Since that time, I have decided to hire my own team of butchers and create my own production line instead of relying on imported meats for resale,” he said, adding that avoiding international brands and having the slaughtering done on premises is the best advice for consumers who want to strictly guarantee that their meats are truly halal.
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« Reply #4 on: Aug 12, 2009 08:47 PM »

After watching one to many documentaries on chemicals and doing some research, and realizing that there are harmful chemicals in almost everything we use, I started buying all natural, or mostly natural products. It can be costly. Then I realized, I can just make my own! So now i make my own body butters, lotion bars, scrubs, lip balms, etc. Definetly not rocket science.

Also after going mostly natural, my daughter's excema (mild) is almost non-existent now, alhamdulilah.

If anyone has a little time to spare  I would recommend making your own. Just find a reputable supplier who lists the source of the ingredient since some do come from animals. Then you actually know what you are putting on your skin. Insha-allah my plan is to do short workshops here to teach people how to make natural cosmetics. Seriously, its not hard!
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