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Author Topic: Lunar Impact This Friday  (Read 1303 times)
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Mohamed
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« on: Oct 07, 2009 08:59 AM »


Inshaallah, this Friday morning, Oct 9th, at approximately 4:30 am PDT, NASA's LCROSS spacecraft and its Centaur booster rocket will plunge one after another into a shadowed crater near the Moon's south pole. The spectacular double-impact will be shown live on NASA TV from the point of view of the LCROSS spacecraft. Meanwhile, impact debris plumes emerging from the crater may be visible through backyard telescopes. North American sky watchers west of the Mississippi river are favored with darkness and good views of the Moon at the time of impact.

Cant wait here is a simulation

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2009/images/lcrossvg/preview.mov
Mohamed
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« Reply #1 on: Oct 09, 2009 09:20 AM »

I got an answer from The Flight Director, he has explained the moon's north and south poles and rotation once a day in relation to the rotation of the earth...

Quote
I'm actually sitting on console now, so don't have much time. I'd like to try and briefly answer some of your questions:

1. For those of you concerned about our impact's effect on Earth's tides, not to worry. Even though this impact is "big" on the human scale, it's truly negligible on the lunar scale. Mathematically, our Centaur impact will affect the moon's trajectory around the Earth, but imperceptibly so. Our impact will have absolutely no measurable effect on the moon's orbit, or on Earth's tides. LCROSS's momentum is simply too small, compared to the moon's, do cause a measurable change.

2. As for the definition of the south pole, actually the moon does spin about an axis. Imagine this: as the moon orbits the Earth, the same side faces us all the time. Over a full orbit, to keep the same side facing the Earth, it has to rotate once. The axis about which it spins defines the poles in the same way the Earth's spin axis does.

3. As for those of you that prefer GMT for reference times, I apologize for not explaining. "UTC", or Universal Coordinated Time is actually equivalent (for all practical purposes) to GMT (Greenwich Mean Time), so please treat those "UTC" times as GMT.

Here's the latest information from the mission. Shift A has successfully loaded all of our command sequences for our rotation to Separation attitude, as well as those for Separation, Centaur Observation, and Braking Burn. We're just 1 hour from rotating to the Separation attitude.

Our public affairs office tells us that the main NASA site will be broadcasting our Separation animation live, as it is happening:

http://www.nasa.gov/externalflash/lcross-centaur-separation/

Check it out! OK, gotta get back to work...enjoy.

-Paul (LCROSS Flight Director) 

http://blogs.nasa.gov/cm/blog/lcrossfdblog.blog/posts/post_1254984713637.html


LUNAR IMPACT UPDATE: NASA's LCROSS spacecraft and its Centaur booster rocket are on course for a Friday morning impact in crater Cabeus near the Moon's south pole. The Centaur will strike first on Oct. 9th at 11:31:19 UT (7:31:19 EDT, 4:31:19 PDT), followed by the LCROSS mothership at 11:35:45 UTC (7:35:45 EDT, 4:35:45). The spectacular double-impact, designed to excavate water frozen in the crater's shadowy depths, will be broadcast live on NASA TV. Amateur astronomers with 10-inch class backyard telescopes may be able to see debris billowing over the crater's rim.

This is a big event! 11:31:19 GMT

USA California 4:31:19

Algeria 12:31:19

Australia Queensland 21:31:19

Australia NSW 22:31:19


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