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Author Topic: Question for those on the board in the medical field  (Read 1062 times)
Blessedgrandma
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« on: Oct 24, 2009 10:44 PM »


Alhumdillah I have been accepted for my midwifery internship.
I'll be doing pre and postnatal exams, well baby checks,
deliveries. So yes, dealing with other peoples body fluids.

I have never had Hep A or Hep B immunizations.
They weren't even part of shots back when my kids 30 yrs ago got their
childhood shots. My doctor even advised the Dt (whooping cough)
cause my last vaccination was when I was a kid and I am nearling 50.
Whooping cough seems to be making a mini come back in some communitites.

When I inquired if they required any vaccinations for staff or interns
the director said no and that the director themselves is one of those anti vaccination thinking folks. I myself am middle road, I am not anti vaccination nor one who will take everyone available and I love to check titers before
getting something (ie: MMR, etc)
I'd sure like some opinions from those here in the medical field,
Is Hep A and Hep B an actual problem?
Should I go a head and get vaccinated (in your opinions)?
Thank you for any wisdom you can share with me purplehijabisis
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« Reply #1 on: Oct 25, 2009 02:39 PM »

 salaam Sister - From what I've learned thus far, in most cases, Hep A is not too much of a problem, as it is a self-limiting disease (meaning it goes away on its own), though it is a highly infectious virus that is transmitted the fecal-oral route. My internal medicine textbook says (published 2008) it is common in overcrowded and poorly sanitized areas. Only 1% of cases can cause fulminant hepatitis, meaning that in a period of 2-3 weeks, it can progress to severe liver failure. Also, once you've had it, your body produces antibodies that protect you for life.  As for vaccination, inactivated virus vaccine is good option.

As for Hep B, this is probably a good idea from what I've learned. There is a recombinant vaccine (Engerix) that produces active immunization in 95% of individuals, like you, who have not been previously exposed to the virus. This virus is transmitted via blood and other bodily fluids, so yes, VERY GOOD IDEA in this case!

Sorry, I should know more at this stage, but this is from my textbook, so have no fear! hehe.

I think you should probably talk to a health professional to see "what's up" in your area, but its seems that getting protected against Hep B would be a "no brainer."

Ma'salaam
 desibro
BABA
5th year medical student (two more years to go(including this year)!!!  inshaallah)

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
Blessedgrandma
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« Reply #2 on: Oct 25, 2009 10:20 PM »

I have talked to my doctor and the nurse and they are gun-ho for vaccines, other folks such as midwife's are more into natural ways and many are anti-vaccination.
From what I can tell of my very limited knowledge, the pro's out weight the cons
(or however that saying goes)
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Hasbi Allah wa ni3mal wakeel!


« Reply #3 on: Oct 27, 2009 12:49 PM »

Salam alaikum sis

Sorry I didnt see this post earlier...congrats on your internship!  Smiley

For Hep B, definitely go for the vaccination.  It is easily transmittable through blood and bodily fluids (which are what births are all about, hehe)...anybody who has contact with blood etc should be immunised!  (I am, so there you are).

The rest are not so important, I would say...

Despite the vaccination, you should be extra careful when handling the births etc, to minimise your exposure.  And thank Allah swt that you're not working in an area where there are other hazards, like HIV. May Allah swt protect us.

Let us know how things go, inshaAllah, wish you all the best.   
Salam
S.
Blessedgrandma
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« Reply #4 on: Oct 28, 2009 12:14 AM »

Thank you sister. I have decided to go a head and have the Hep A and Hep B since they are usually given at the same time in the same shot.
Better safe than sorry and since most of the women I will be helping birth
will be from out of the country (Like 90%) my doctor thinks it is even more so important. I'm so thrilled and very much look forward to this internship.
It will be easier and faster to get all my clinical in verses as an apprentice.

 purplehijabisis
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