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blackrose
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« on: Nov 25, 2009 07:12 PM »


Thanksgivings+ `Eid al -Adha=…

By  Nihad Awad

National Executive Director of CAIR
 
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Just as Thanksgiving is a time of family and friends, so too is Eid al-Adha. The Prophet Muhammad told the early Muslims, "[T]hey are days of [eating] and rejoicing with one's family."
 Many American Muslims will eat their turkey a bit late in the day this year because Thanksgiving falls on the same day some Muslims fast until sunset in observance of the Day of Arafah, the spiritual peak of the annual pilgrimage (Hajj) to Makkah.

Arafah is a hill called "Mount of Mercy" and its surrounding empty plain near Makkah. On this climax of the Hajj season millions of pilgrims of all races and backgrounds, including thousands of Americans, will assemble for supplication to God. This is a physical representation of universal equality and the unity of humankind.

American Muslims have a double blessing this year. They are marking events, Thanksgiving and the end of Hajj, with activities that stress sharing with others and the importance of family to people of all faiths.

The New Jersey chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) called on Muslims in that state to volunteer at a soup kitchen as a way to celebrate Thanksgiving and the end of the Hajj. CAIR’s Cincinnati chapter is giving food packages, including turkeys, to needy families.

Thanksgiving week, the Muslims Against Hunger Project is organizing special "Muslims Serve" days to recall the ultimate sacrifice the Prophet Abraham was prepared to make and to offer thanks for God's many blessings.

Hajj and Thanksgiving were also combined in a New Jersey food giveaway for the needy on Sunday in Plainfield, N.J., at the Center of Islamic Enlightenment.


And you know Thanksgiving and Eid al-Adha are now sharing the same spiritual and social space when Best Buy, for the first time, puts a "Happy Eid Al-Adha" in its "Black Friday" newspaper insert.
In Mississippi, scores of Muslim volunteers gave up their free time to feed the hungry and homeless in areas particularly hard hit by the national recession.

Muslim university students in North Carolina this year donated food to groups that feed the hungry. While in California, Muslims joined Jews, Buddhists, Baha'is, and Catholics at an interfaith Thanksgiving celebration in a synagogue. Muslims in Iowa, along with representatives of nine other faith traditions, attended the annual Inter-Religious Council Thanksgiving Prayer Service in Cedar Rapids.

In Georgia, Christians, Muslims and Jews came together to share a pre-Thanksgiving dinner. Proceeds from the dinner went to a local food bank.

On Friday, Muslims in America and worldwide will celebrate the holiday of Eid al-Adha, or "festival of the sacrifice." "Eid" also commemorates the Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ishmael at God's command. The holiday is celebrated with prayers, gifts for children, distribution of meat to the needy, and social gatherings. You may hear the greeting “Eid Mubarak,” or “have a blessed holiday.”

And you know Thanksgiving and Eid al-Adha are now sharing the same spiritual and social space when Best Buy, for the first time, puts a "Happy Eid Al-Adha" in its "Black Friday" newspaper insert.

As with Thanksgiving, Eid al-Adha is a time when everyone counts their blessings and offers thanks for friends and family, even if circumstances may not be the best in any particular year.

"The first to be summoned to paradise on the Day of Resurrection will be those who praise God in prosperity and adversity," said the Prophet Muhammad.

Just as Thanksgiving is a time of family and friends, so too is Eid al-Adha. The Prophet Muhammad told the early Muslims, "[T]hey are days of [eating] and rejoicing with one's family."

The Qur'an urges those who reach physical and spiritual maturity to pray: (My Lord! Grant me the grace that I may thank you for the favors that You have bestowed on me and on my parents, and that I may do good deeds that will please You.)

So this year, despite a weak but recovering economy and other domestic and international troubles, let us all count our blessings and demonstrate true thankfulness by sharing whatever we have with those in need.

Nihad Awad is national executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), America's largest Muslim civil rights organization. He may be contacted at: nawad@cair.com.
doninapond
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« Reply #1 on: Nov 25, 2009 07:31 PM »

I really don't think it is good for dawa for Muslims to be seen having anything to do with thanks giving.
Thanks giving is about murdering native Americans. Even though most Americans view the murder of native Americans as something to celebrate, Muslims should not celebrate it. Native Americans are not our enemies. Native Americans are not the ones who invaded Iraq and Afghanistan. They have done nothing to us so why should we celebrate their extermination?

Instead Muslims should follow the Sunnah. We should slaughter sheep, and distribute a third to the poor, and a third to our friends family and neighbors. If every Muslim in America who can afford it did that, they would feed a lot more people than a few slices of pig fat fried turkey will do.
People do not learn about our religion by us following their religion and abandoning the Sunnah of our Prophet pbh.

I think a lot of people view the conversion of a white as something much higher than the conversion of a person of colour.
The poorest people in America are the natives. These are the people whose murder is being celebrated in thanks giving.
So instead of following the Sunnah of the people who smashed the heads of native american babies with hammers and boots to save money on bullets, follow the Sunnah of Prophets Abraham as and Mohummed saw. Slaughter sheep, distribute a third of each one you slaughter to the poor, including the poorest in America, the people who are in the Native reserves.
extrusion
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« Reply #2 on: Nov 26, 2009 03:50 PM »

How can  anyone want to mix Islam and Kufr?
Isn't that how Christmas and Easter were invented?
Muslims hqave two Eids Eid ul Adha and Eid ul Fitra, we do not recognise thanks giving. Mixing it with our Biggest Eid is a big Biddah.
Aren't the two Eids enough? Isn't the Sunnah of our Prophet pbh enough? Why do we have any reason  to mix what they do with what we do?
Our Prophet Ebrahim as slaughtered a Ram not a Turkey! Are there no rams in America? Is that the reason for replacing it with a Turkey?
Our Prophet pbh's sunnah is giving a third of the Qurbani meat to the poor, why not do that instead of following kufr by replacing that Sunnah with turkey meat?
In Eid ul Adha we celebrate Prophet Ebrahims great sacrifice when he obeyed Allah by attempting to slaughter his own son, while Thanks giving is about colonialists obeying shatan by slaughtering the sons and daughters of Native Americans. There is a big difference between the two, it is best not to mix them up.
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« Reply #3 on: Nov 28, 2009 06:38 AM »


Thanks giving is about murdering native Americans. Even though most Americans view the murder of native Americans as something to celebrate, Muslims should not celebrate it. Native Americans are not our enemies. Native Americans are not the ones who invaded Iraq and Afghanistan. They have done nothing to us so why should we celebrate their extermination?


that's pretty silly.  thanksgiving has nothing to do with murdering native americans.  its about giving thanks....

you can argue ad nauseum as to whether it is bidaa, etc..., but muslims celebrate a million different things besides the two eids, and this is simply harmless and extremely, extremely fun....

i love thanksgiving!!!
doninapond
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« Reply #4 on: Nov 28, 2009 07:56 AM »

Lucid What were they giving thanks about?
The settlers who stole Plymath (The American one) from the natives ran out of food so they attacked the natives, kidnapped their women and children to force the native men to give them food.
I don't think the Natives had much to give thanks about, having to spend the winter with no food.
It is true many Muslims celebrate many silly things from other religions, there are deviants in Bulgaria who celebrate Easter even though we don't believe in the Crucifixion for example.
Some in India and Africa even worship Idols, rocks and trees because that is what the people of their nation do, AND IT'S FUN!
But this doesn't mean we should do it. And the silly people who do it should stop doing it, no matter how much fun it is.
May Allah protect us from the FUN of the disbelievers and give us the fun of our own two IDs.
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