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Author Topic: Time Travel to Andalus (Muslim Spain) Free Online Webinar (Tonight)  (Read 2339 times)
UBAB
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« on: Feb 22, 2010 09:26 PM »


IlmPath invited you to "Time Travel to Andalus (Muslim Spain) Free Online Webinar" on Monday, February 22 at 8:20pm. (EST)

Event: Time Travel to Andalus (Muslim Spain) Free Online Webinar
What: Lecture
Start Time: Monday, February 22 at 8:20pm
End Time: Monday, February 22 at 9:50pm
Where: http://www.facebook.com/l/f94eb;www.ilmpath.com/webinar

To see more details and RSVP, follow the link below:

http://www.facebook.com/n/?event.php&eid=322320529232&mid=1ea39cdG1e6f9c5fG42280ecG7


---- For more info www.ilmpath.com ---- To attend webinar, go to www.ilmpath.com/webinar ----
Board a time machine and take a time travel to the Lost Kingdom History of Andalus.

In this free webinar, you are going to learn about the peak of Islamic civilization, how to analyze Islamic History to benefit your everyday life, and will get a taste for the upcoming course Insha'Allah.

Sh. Waleed Abdulhakeem has traveled all the way to Spain to prepare for this course. This webinar will give you an early sneak peak of the course. Better yet, those who attend until the end will get a discount coupon code for the course limited to the first 30 people who use it!

Forward to everyone you know! For more info, go to www.ilmpath.com to register. Hurry up, prices go up on Sunday Feb 21 midnight!

Also don't forget to attend the Tour of the Course in the following areas:

---Toronto East: Friday 7pm: Abu Huraira Centre - 270 Yorkland Blvd in Scarborough (with Q&A)
--- Toronto West: Saturday after ISHA: Isna Islamic Centre - 2200 South Sheridan way in Mississauga (with Q&A)



Your heart will not truly open until you understand Surah 21 : Verse 92  (Al-Anbiya: The Prophets)

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jannah
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« Reply #1 on: Feb 23, 2010 07:48 AM »

thanks for posting this bro ubab. i love all things andalusia turned it on to watch it but fell asleep Sad still recovering from the flu i think. they seem to have recorded it tho so i'll check it out tomorrow ia

ws
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« Reply #2 on: Feb 23, 2010 09:26 AM »

AoA,

there seems to be quite a lot of interest in Andalus - a muslim "lost world of Atlantis" perhaps - only it was quite real at one time;

I recently read "Death and Exile: The Ethnic Cleansing of Ottoman Muslims, 1821-1922" [ISBN-10: 0878500944]. It chronicles a more recent and similarly devastating experience of a muslim population. When this process started, as much as 50 % of rumelia (which included much of today's Romania) was muslim and so for large areas of the "Balkans" (I may be wrong but BUlgaria still has a large "Turkish"** minority. I often wonder how they lived their lives and what their social life was like - their hopes and dreams - their wishes and desires.

**A word here about "Turkish" in the lands of the osmanlis. Being restricted to the english language, I can only read narratives in english but it seems to me that the many europeans had a tendency to call many, perhaps most,  who converted to islam as "turks" regardless of their "modern" classification e.g. Mehmet Ali the founder of modern egypt was born in albania but nobody knows the origins of his parents. This has to do, I think, with muslim self identity where they identified themselves most immediately by family, clan or, in urban settings, city with "muslim' being the larger group identity - there being no concept of present ethnicity or "nations" in the sense of the present world - the latter being a construct of the colonial age.

The survivors of these populations settled in the remains of the osmanli's territories...

jannah
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« Reply #3 on: Feb 24, 2010 06:34 AM »

This is an interesting way of putting it
Quote
Andalus - a muslim "lost world of Atlantis"
definitely a lost world or civilization. I can't say why others like it, but I love the art, architecture, the poetry, the imagery, arches, gardens, imagery of light, fountains, greenery, flowers, water, the calligraphy, courtyards... i dunno something about it all reminds one of jannat as well.

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« Reply #4 on: Feb 26, 2010 07:52 AM »

That is precisely what I meant -they had their own "art, architecture, the poetry, the imagery, arches, gardens, imagery of light, fountains, greenery, flowers, water, the calligraphy, courtyards" no doubt influenced by the osmanli's but with local characteristics. The european muslim presence was just as broad in east-central europe as is western europe (andalus). In fact the osmanlis were initially a european state (bayazit = bin yazid!) before they expanded to the east. from 1453 onwards they spread west, north and north east peaking in ca 1570 CE from which date they were slowly pushed back from the fringes of Moscow and Kiev (?) back to eastern anatolia in 1923 when the mustafa dissolved the last major muslim state of the 20th century (by the early 20th century mst hte muslim world was directly or indirectly colonized - Saudi Arabia was a British client state; Iran could exercise no significant influence on world events and I cannot think of any other independent muslim state.

most of the survivors were absorbed into the anatolian muslim population.

Another aspect is the surprising, given the difficulties of travel in those days, degree of mobility of the people on those days -thus we see andalusians in far east and vice versa.
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