// UN chief: Never seen anything like Pakistan floods
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« on: Aug 15, 2010 08:52 PM »


-> UN chief: Never seen anything like Pakistan floods <- "The world body has appealed for an initial $460 million to provide relief, but only 20 percent has been given." 20 million people homeless & starving!!! SadSad:(Now is the time to spend your Zakat!! See devastating pictures: http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/08/continuing_pa...kistani_floods.html

UN chief: Never seen anything like Pakistan floods

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100815/ap_on_re_as/as_pakistan_floods

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan – U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said Sunday he has never seen anything like the flood disaster in Pakistan after surveying the devastation and urged foreign donors to speed up assistance to the 20 million people affected.

Ban's comments reflect the concern of the international community about the unfolding disaster in Pakistan, which is battling al-Qaida and Taliban militants, has a weak and unpopular government, and an anemic economy propped up by international assistance.

"This has been a heart-wrenching day for me," Ban said after flying over the hard-hit areas with President Asif Ali Zardari. "I will never forget the destruction and suffering I have witnessed today. In the past I have witnessed many natural disasters around the world, but nothing like this."

Ban visited Myanmar after Cyclone Nargis devastated the country in May 2008, killing an estimated 138,000 people. He also flew to China's Sichuan province just days after an earthquake killed nearly 90,000 people in March 2008.

The floods that began more than two weeks ago in Pakistan's mountainous northwest have now hit about one-quarter of the country, especially its agricultural heartland. While the death toll of 1,500 is relatively small, the scale of the flooding and number of people whose lives have been disrupted is staggering.

The world body has appealed for an initial $460 million to provide relief, but only 20 percent has been given.


Once the floods recede, billions more will be needed for reconstruction and getting people back to work in the already-poor nation of 170 million people. The International Monetary Fund has warned the floods could dent economic growth and fuel inflation.

"Waves of flood must be met with waves of support from the world," said Ban. "I'm here to urge the world to step up assistance," he said.

President Zardari has been criticized for his response to the disaster, especially for going ahead with a state visit to Europe just as the crisis was unfolding. Zardari has visited victims twice since returning, but images of him at a family owned chateau while in France are likely to hurt him for months to come.

In his first comments to the media since returning, he defended the government.

"The government has responded very responsibly," he said, saying the army, the police, the navy and officials were all working to relieve the suffering. "I would appeal to the press to understand the magnitude of the disaster."

Zardari said it would take up to two years for the country to recover.

Ban said visa restrictions had been eased for humanitarian workers and they now could get visas on arrival at Pakistan airports.

On Saturday, the prime minister said 20 million people had been made homeless in the disaster.

The monsoon rains that triggered the disaster are forecast to fall for several weeks yet, meaning the worst may not yet be over. Over the weekend, tens of thousand of people were forced to flee their homes when they were inundated by fresh floods from the swollen River Indus.

While local charities and international agencies have helped hundreds of thousands of people with food, water, shelter and medical treatment, the scale of the disaster has meant that many millions have received little or no assistance. The U.N. has voiced fears that disease in overcrowded and unsanitary relief camps may yet cause more deaths.

Earlier Sunday, survivors fought over food being handed out from a relief vehicle close to the town of Sukkur in hard-hit Sindh province, ripping at each others' clothes and causing such chaos that the distribution had to be abandoned, according to an Associated Press reporter at the scene.

"The impatience of the people has deprived us of the little food that had come," said Shaukat Ali, a flood victim waiting for food.

Waters five feet (1.5 meters) deep washed through Derra Allah Yar, a city of 300,000 people on the border of Sindh and Baluchistan provinces, said government official Salim Khoso. About 200,000 had fled the city and Khoso said he did not know how they would be fed.

"We are here like beggars," said Mukhtar Ali, a 45-year-old accountant living on the side of a highway along with thousands of other people. "The last food we received was a small packet of rice yesterday and 15 of us shared that."
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« Reply #1 on: Aug 15, 2010 09:31 PM »

Salam Alaikum Sister Jannah,

What is the best way to send Zakat to Pakistan? Is there a trusted organization that you can recommend?
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« Reply #2 on: Aug 15, 2010 10:43 PM »

wsalam,

I like Islamic Relief http://www.islamicreliefusa.org/pakistan-floods which is a very big and well known relief group and they also have ppl in pakistan. Also overhead is very small, most of your money will go to programs.
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« Reply #3 on: Aug 16, 2010 12:48 AM »

91.9% goes to the programs, that's very good.

Assalamu Alaikum
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« Reply #4 on: Aug 16, 2010 05:33 AM »

More... Sad


Why is the world unmoved by the plight of Pakistan?


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/why-is-the-world-unmoved-by-the-plight-of-pakistan-2051331.html
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« Reply #5 on: Aug 18, 2010 11:44 PM »



Jolie donates 100,000 dollars to aid Pakistan

(AFP) – 5 hours ago

PARIS — Hollywood star Angelina Jolie, in Europe to promote her spy thriller "Salt", has handed 100,000 dollars (78,000 euros) to help refugees from Pakistan's floods, UN sources told AFP.

A crowd of 1,000 fans engulfed the 34-year-old actress, who is also a goodwill ambassador for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, when she stepped out of a limousine in Paris on Tuesday evening clad in a short shiny number with plunging neckline for the French premiere of the movie.

A UNHCR source attending the gala screening said she had donated the sum to help relieve Pakistan, where aid has been short and slow in coming.

In the film Jolie plays captivating CIA officer Evelyn Salt, who is accused of being a Russian spy and must prove her innocence while on the run.
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« Reply #6 on: Aug 19, 2010 07:03 PM »

Thanks Jannah for the info on the Islamic Relief site!

I believe in Islam like the sun rising, not because I see it but because by it, I see everything else.
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« Reply #7 on: Aug 20, 2010 11:14 PM »

I was looking for this before and couldn't find it. I know they do excellent work in Pakistan.

You should contact the office and then they tell you how to send money.

ws

http://www.edhifoundation.com/contact.asp
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« Reply #8 on: Aug 21, 2010 05:25 PM »

 alhamdulillahsmiley My many friends are their in pkistan and they are also helping the victim of flood Sad
Its so painful to listen this we ALL can Raise our hand n do dua far all people out their n try to help thm as possible way May ALLAH make thm ease soon  ameen

When you feel all alone in this world
And there's nobody to count your tears
Just remember, no matter where you are
Allah knows
Allah knows.....
Alhamdaollilah
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« Reply #9 on: Aug 23, 2010 08:01 AM »

Pakistan floods: Senior UN figure criticises response

The International Monetary Fund said Pakistan faced a "massive economic challenge"
A senior United Nations official has called on the global community to urgently step up its response to the floods that have struck Pakistan.

Louis-George Arsenault, director of emergency operations for Unicef in New York, described the lack of support as "quite extraordinary".

The humanitarian crisis was the largest "in decades", he warned.

Mr Arsenault spoke as the International Monetary Fund was due to start talks with Pakistani officials in Washington.

The talks on Monday will allow the IMF to assess how best to give help. It says the floods that have struck Pakistan pose a "massive economic challenge" and it will review the country's budget and financial prospects.

Threatened flood-surge
As officials prepared for the meetings, Mr Arsenault, of the UN children's fund, said: "One of the major challenges that we have which is quite extraordinary is the lack of level of support from the international community.

"Right now, our level of needs in terms of funding is huge compared to what we've been receiving, even though this is the largest, by far, humanitarian crisis we've seen in decades."

Tens of thousands more Pakistanis have been fleeing the floods, with the south now bearing the brunt.

Overall, about 1,600 people have been killed and 20 million affected.

Continue reading the main story
Pakistan's Monsoon Floods

US help warms hearts
Exodus from town
Forgotten humanity
Economic fears
In southern Pakistan tens of thousands of people are fleeing a threatened flood-surge, three weeks after heavy monsoon rains first hit the country.

In the city of Shahdadkot, a hastily built barrier has been breached, allowing floodwaters to approach houses.

An estimated four million people have now been displaced in the city of Sukkar alone.

Meanwhile, the World Health Organization (WHO) says diseases are spreading in affected areas.

'Unprecedented flood'
Sindh in the south is now being described as the country's worst-hit province, with officials saying at least 200,000 residents have fled in the last 24 hours.

In Shahdadkot, the BBC's Jill McGivering says residents are leaving en masse to try to reach safe ground.

The makeshift 4ft mud barrier, built by the army and volunteers, was the city's last line of defence and has now been breached in several places.

Jam Saifullah Dharejo, Sindh provincial irrigation minister, said that most people had been escorted to safety, but efforts were under way to help those still stranded.

"We are trying to save the city from the unprecedented flood," he said.


Sindh is now being described as the worst-hit province
The Pakistan government has said that the cost of rebuilding after the floods could be as high as $15bn (£10bn).

About one-tenth of the homeless have places in relief camps, the rest are trying to survive alone, without shelter or any assurance of food, she says. Aid is being provided but it is limited and in enormous demand.

Dozens more villages have been inundated and although authorities expect flood waters to drain into the Arabian Sea over the next few days, evacuees who return may find their homes and livelihoods have been washed away.

The UN says it has now raised about 70% of the $460m it called for in its emergency appeal, as donors pledged more money.

Pakistan has also accepted $5m (£3.2m) in aid from its rival and neighbour India.

The floods began last month in Pakistan's north-west after heavy monsoon rains and have since swept south, swamping thousands of towns and villages in Punjab and Sindh provinces.

The UN said on Friday that more helicopters were urgently needed to reach communities cut off by the water.

Experts warn of a second wave of deaths from water-borne diseases such as cholera unless flood victims have access to supplies of fresh drinking water.

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
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« Reply #10 on: Aug 23, 2010 08:04 AM »

Who cares about Pakistan?
By Jude Sheerin
BBC News
Donations have been sluggish to the Pakistan floods appeals, as they were back in 2005 when the part of Kashmir the country administers was torn apart by an earthquake. The BBC News website asked some experts to comment on possible reasons why.

Donor fatigue



Dr Marie Lall, Pakistan expert at the Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) and senior lecturer at the Institute of Education, says: "I think there is donor fatigue all around. The [2004] Indian Ocean tsunami, the Burmese Cyclone [Nargis, 2008], the [2005] Pakistan earthquake, and [this year's] Haiti earthquake. It is getting too much; we are in a recession and people are short of money."

Rebecca Wynn, Pakistan specialist for UK-based aid agency Oxfam, says: "Many donors have made substantial contributions in humanitarian assistance to Pakistan over the years, particularly in response to the conflict-related displacements over the last two years. Of course, the fact that the people of Pakistan have been hit time and again by disaster is even more reason to give."

Dr Elizabeth Ferris, senior fellow at the US-based Brookings Institution, a foreign policy think tank, says: "It should also be noted that the international humanitarian system isn't set up to deal with more than one major crisis a year. USAID, for example, committed one-third of its annual budget to the Haitian earthquake response. And among the general public there may be a feeling of, 'Well, I donated to the victims of the Haitian earthquake and Haiti is a far needier country than Pakistan.'"

Corruption

Yale University economics professor Dean Karlan, an expert on charitable giving, says: "Corruption concerns may explain why giving is lower to developing countries than many would like it to be, but it does not explain why there is less money pouring into Pakistan now than does to disaster relief causes in other developing countries with similar governance issues."

Dr Marie Lall says: "People in Pakistan are sceptical the government will be transparent. But they are giving to philanthropic organisations. In the UK, I think people are sceptical of [non-governmental organisations'] overheads and costs. They don't know which ones are transparent and reliable, even though local organisations such as TCF [The Citizens' Foundation] are doing an incredible job."

Dr Elizabeth Ferris says: "People are always sceptical about their money reaching flood victims, particularly in countries with reputations for corruption. But Haiti didn't have a very good reputation in this regard. [Pakistan] President [Asif Ali] Zardari trip to Europe [during the floods] was not a good move. For a few days, that was the 'story' of the Pakistani floods, which doesn't inspire people to be generous, particularly in this economic climate."

Terrorism

Dr Marie Lall says: "British Prime Minister David Cameron's comments in India [when he said Islamabad promoted the export of terror] did not help."

Dr Elizabeth Ferris says: "People are less likely to donate to any country seen as a haven for terrorism. And more generally, the fact that so much Western news coverage in recent years about Pakistan has been negative, stressing its links with the conflict in Afghanistan. I think this is the major reason for the slow public response - the image of Pakistan in our media. There may also be a feeling, particularly in the US, that Islamic governments and charities should be stepping up to the plate to donate."

Timing

Rebecca Wynn says: "This disaster has come at a bad time, following the financial crisis and the Haiti earthquake. Many donors made huge commitments to Haiti, so may find it hard to fund another major disaster, particularly in the same year."

Dr Marie Lall says: "Timing may be a factor, but I think it's more to do with not realising the scale of the disaster, and the attitude by the British government; the UK should be leading the aid effort, given the Pakistani diaspora here and the fact that we need Pakistan for the war in Afghanistan."

'Wrong' disaster

Professor Dean Karlan says: "Sudden events seem to generate more funds. A flood (and droughts) happen gradually and build. There isn't any one single day in which news is huge. For the same reason, this pushes the story away from the media spotlight. But massive and sudden earthquakes or tsunamis draw our immediate attention and shock us."

Dr Elizabeth Ferris says: "It's important to note that in general people are likely to give more to emergencies occurring in countries geographically closer to them - although this didn't hold true for the tsunami. But when you trace contributions over time, you find that Americans and Canadians are more likely to respond to disasters in the Western hemisphere while Europeans tend to be more responsive to African countries (and their former colonies, in particular)."

Dr Marie Lall says: "This was not one cataclysmic event, but one which grew over three weeks. The fact that 25% of the country was or is under water is not understood. The low numbers of dead, relatively speaking, mask the disaster on the ground. The crisis has destroyed crops, dead livestock and damaged homes and infrastructure. Food prices are through the roof and there won't be a normal harvest. It will get worse. Farmers will starve."

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
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« Reply #11 on: Sep 06, 2010 03:30 PM »

Well, no surprise here, though, just adds to the sadness and frustration to the entire condition of the Pakistani people and the floods. Yup, another video from Al Jazeera:


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« Reply #12 on: Sep 07, 2010 02:28 PM »

UN in fresh appeal for Pakistan flood victims  
 
This is the fourth visit by Ms Jolie to Pakistan since she became a UNHCR goodwill ambassador

The UN has made a fresh appeal for Pakistan's flood victims as film star Angelina Jolie has arrived in the country to highlight their plight.

The UN High Commission for Refugees says that it needs $120m (£78m) for tents and other supplies.

A UN official told the AFP news agency that so far it has received about two-thirds of $459m (£298m) originally asked for in August.

He said that a second appeal would be launched on 17 September.

UN Assistant Secretary General Ajay Chhibber said that helping Pakistanis to rebuild their homes and businesses was of paramount importance for the country's long-term regional and global stability.

"Now that the water has receded in large parts... what's clear from these visits is that the early recovery needs to start now," Mr Chhibber told AFP during a visit to the militant-hit northwest.

"If there's greater unrest in Pakistan it will have much greater regional and global implications."

The UN has warned that the slow pace of pledges could impede relief operations. It says that the country faces a triple threat to food supplies - with seeds, crops and incomes hit.

Handouts to survive   
In the south of Pakistan, areas are being newly-flooded even as the long process of reconstruction begins in the north.


Millions of people are still reliant on food handouts
Correspondents say that half of the rural population of Sindh province has been affected by the flooding - where the water has been slower to drain because the terrain is flatter.

Officials say that eight million people remain reliant on aid handouts to survive, six weeks after monsoon rains caused the flooding.

Advancing floodwaters continue to threaten the towns of Johi and Dadu in Sindh province, officials say, with 19 of its 23 districts under water and 2.8 million people displaced.

"Armed forces and irrigation officials are racing against time to save Johi and Dadu," provincial Irrigation Minister Jam Saifullah Dharejo told AFP.

"Floodwaters are increasing pressure on Johi embankment, while the raging waters are just 5km (three miles) away from Dadu city."

He said residents had formed a human chain to help reinforce embankments securing the towns in what was a "very heartening and courageous" initiative.

Ms Jolie says that the situation also remained desperate in the north-west.

"From what I understand the situation is on a scale that we have not really seen the likes of. It's on a huge scale," she told reporters at a camp for the displaced.

"It is extraordinarily complex situation, it's not just the floods," she said, referring to the 1.7 million Afghan refugees living in temporary camps in the north-west.

Wearing a red-lined black cloak, the actor said she was upset to see the people's plight and called for donations through various channels, including the UN's official appeal.

She is travelling as a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations refugee agency, the UNHCR, and was making her fourth visit to Pakistan since being appointed in 2001.

Last week Ms Jolie released a video appealing for more donations on behalf of nearly 21 million people who have been affected by the disaster.

The 34-year-old visited affected communities where millions of long-term Afghan refugees reside.

She has personally donated $100,000 to the flood appeal.

The UNHCR is providing relief aid including shelter materials to those displaced by the disaster, which officially has killed 1,760 people.

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
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« Reply #13 on: Sep 08, 2010 03:13 PM »


The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
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