// Egypt braced for 'day of revolution' protests
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BrKhalid
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« Reply #50 on: Feb 10, 2011 08:07 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

So Mubarak is due to address the nation in the next few hours with rumours flying that he may indeed step down.

Will it happen?

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #51 on: Feb 10, 2011 08:10 PM »

It should be in 10 minutes or so, but apparently, like us desi's - Egyptians are notorious for being late - as it was supposed to more than 2 hours ago originally. I should be studying right now, but I'm glued to Al Jazeera live stream of course. No worries though, I can stay up late - no class.

Go away Mubarak!

Go Egypt!


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« Reply #52 on: Feb 10, 2011 09:04 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum  bro

I wonder what the reaction of the people will be tomorrow given that he still refuses to go.

It's almost as if Mabarak wants the country to descend into real chaos!!

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #53 on: Feb 10, 2011 09:04 PM »

OMG - What an arrogant !@#$%^!

Always, "I this, I that" When will he realize, it is not about him, it is about the nation - something that is far bigger, far more important than he ever will be.


Why does he always have to bring up all the things he has done in the past? Never forced himself to power??? Really? I guess he wasn't "fed up" back then - sheesh!


Anti-climactic, but love how the crowd erupted when it was clear he wasn't leaving.

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« Reply #54 on: Feb 10, 2011 10:29 PM »

salam

Quote
I wonder what the reaction of the people will be tomorrow given that he still refuses to go.

most people are not optimistic ...
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« Reply #55 on: Feb 10, 2011 11:32 PM »

ws,

This time I didn't expect him to step down at all.

He's been the supreme power, sole dictator for 30 years, basically his entire life. He's put down these rebellions ruthlessly before so he's trying to do the same. Divide and conquer, use violence and chaos, every method possible to put this down. Imagine the people of Musa going to Firwan and saying OK your time is up. He didn't give up until the very scream of death was at the back of his throat.

The most interesting thing said tonight was by a commentator on Aljazeera who said "the question is WHY IS HE STILL THERE???  that should be asked, and the reason is because the US and Israel do not want their puppet gone."

I was like YESsssssssssss finally the truth.

UPDATE:

PS for those upset about losing their $2/day which is the average salary in egypt... Analysis shows that the protests hurt the economy in the short term, but reforms can have long term gains. http://ow.ly/3Tn2R

Also op-ed by "Muslim Brotherhood" which makes some interesting points: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/10/opinion/10erian.html?_r=1&hp
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« Reply #56 on: Feb 11, 2011 04:27 PM »

salam

he just stepped down ....

Allahu akbar

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« Reply #57 on: Feb 11, 2011 04:38 PM »

Allahu Akbar.  This is a beautiful day.  I am overwhelmed.  InshaAllah I will share my thoughts and experiences of the last few weeks soon.

salaam,
7
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« Reply #58 on: Feb 11, 2011 05:01 PM »

TAKBEER!!!!!

 akbar akbar akbar akbar akbar akbar akbar akbar akbar


OK, I am teary-eyed/crying and I'm not even Egyptian!!!!! To be honest, he was the one Arab "leader" is the one I wanted to go, once I had learnt more about Egypt and the issue with Israel - indeed a great and beautiful day!!!!

Sis Se7en - very happy for you and your fellow Egyptians! Looking forward to your thoughts dear sister!



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« Reply #59 on: Feb 11, 2011 05:28 PM »

Indeed a great day for Egypt and its people.

I just hope the despotic regime will be substituted by a sane one and not an even more pathetic one.
By that I mean that now Egypt has deposed Mubarak, it should temper its emotions and focus on who replaces him.
Not like Pakistan where Musharraf(who was actually better than any other leader) was replaced by a rotten head(lol..King Abdullah sure made an impression on me).
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« Reply #60 on: Feb 11, 2011 05:45 PM »

Allahu Akbar!!!!! It seems that the people have overcome the fear in themselves, and Allah has changed their condition.   :'(  (tears of joy smiley)

May Allah grant the Egyptian people just and wise rulers.

t
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« Reply #61 on: Feb 11, 2011 05:58 PM »

Alhamdulillahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! A True Jumah Mubarak to everyoneeeeeeeeeeeee (no pun intended) Wink :DDD


have a  bebzi bebzi bebzi bebzi bebzi bebzi bebzi bebzi bebzi bebzi on me!!!!!
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« Reply #62 on: Feb 11, 2011 06:38 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

After the huge disappointment last night, what great news today!!

I'm so happy for those who put their lives on the line and those who had to pay with theirs.

May Allah grant the country just and befitting rulers.

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #63 on: Feb 11, 2011 06:48 PM »

YAAAAAAAAAAAAY! Again! Thanks for the bebzi's Sis Jannah!!!!  Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy


Yeah, what a wrong name he was given!! I just came back from the Pakistani restaurant I frequent (they have al Jazeera there too!) and I said to one bhaya, "Itna mubarak baath hai, uff! *pointing to the TV*" When I heard myself say that, I was like crap - that almost ruins the whole phrase!

Anyways, it was great to be able to share the last 18 days with all of you via the board - I know there is lots ahead, but ma'sha'allah, the sacrifice those young martyrs made has not been made in vain!


This is just too good! Let's keep the dictators falling! 2 down - some more to go!

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« Reply #64 on: Feb 11, 2011 06:53 PM »

Subhanallah! According to CNN, the Swiss assets of Mubarak and company are being frozen. ...I wonder if he actually left any money there.

(Thanks for the bebzi Jannah!)
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« Reply #65 on: Feb 11, 2011 10:44 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

Quote
Whether these current protests can maintain their momentum will have to be seen.

Those who remember the Communist downfall will recall how night after night people came out on to the streets until there was no going back.

Allah knows best what will happen here.


Well we now know how things have turned out and seeing the jubilation of Egyptians, be they old or young, Muslim or Christian gives an indication of how hated the previous regime was.

There so many angles to this story but one poignant lesson for me is that no matter who you are, what you have or who you know, there will *always* come a time when you will be accountable for your actions.

The disgrace Mubarak is feeling today could be nothing in comparison to what he may have to face in the Hereafter.

Egypt is the land of the Pharoahs but today the people can collectively lay claim to Musa (as) who stood up to Pharoah and defeated him despite huge odds against him and his people.

Let that be the lesson to those who continue to oppress those who are innocent or too weak to defend themselves; your time will surely come.

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #66 on: Feb 11, 2011 10:56 PM »

Quote
The disgrace Mubarak is feeling today could be nothing in comparison to what he may have to face in the Hereafter.

Egypt is the land of the Pharaohs but today the people can collectively lay claim to Musa (as) who stood up to Pharaoh and defeated him despite huge odds against him and his people.

Let that be the lesson to those who continue to oppress those who are innocent or too weak to defend themselves; your time will surely come.

Ma'sha'allah Khalid bhai, you always put things so wisely.

That is such a poignant reference that many have brought up of course, in terms of Egypt being the land of the Pharaohs and that the last few generations have their own, yet we have witnessed his fall - his arrogance getting the best of him, just as it did with Hz Musa's (AS) Fir'aun; though in this case, Allah (swt) has spared this generations' - for the time being or at least in this life. I can only imagine what he has to face - while we have wronged a few people in our lives, whether by mistake or on purpose (May Allah Forgive us), he has willfully wronged millions.



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« Reply #67 on: Feb 12, 2011 04:50 AM »

What a great day!!

Alhamdulillah it was jumah, a dictator was overthrown and the people of Egypt were given freedom and are now praying Fajr in the same square they partied in all night!! I drank real sugar in my tea and had a real diet bebzi after a long time and we had a post-regime party in the madina chat!!

Cheesy

They had Muhammad Jibreel doing dua and Qaradawi doing khutbah!!!

Du'aa by Sh. Muhammad Jibreel in Tahrir Square, 2.11.11 as Hosni Mubarak resigns



A cool tour of Tahrir Square! http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-12434787
==================================
A tyrant's exit. A nation's joy

Robert Fisk: They sang. They laughed. They cried. Mubarak was no more


Everyone suddenly burst out singing.

And laughing, and crying, and shouting and praying, kneeling on the road and kissing the filthy tarmac right in front of me, and dancing and praising God for ridding them of Hosni Mubarak – a generous moment, for it was their courage rather than divine intervention which rid Egypt of its dictator – and weeping tears which splashed down their clothes. It was as if every man and woman had just got married, as if joy could smother the decades of dictatorship and pain and repression and humiliation and blood. Forever, it will be known as the Egyptian Revolution of 25 January – the day the rising began – and it will be forever the story of a risen people.

The old man had gone at last, handing power not to the Vice-President but – ominously, though the millions of non-violent revolutionaries were in no mood to appreciate this last night – to Egypt's army council, to a field marshal and a lot of brigadier generals, guarantors, for now, of all that the pro-democracy protesters had fought and, in some cases, died for. Yet even the soldiers were happy. At the very moment when the news of Mubarak's demise licked like fire through the demonstrators outside the army-protected state television station on the Nile, the face of one young officer burst into joy. All day, the demonstrators had been telling the soldiers that they were brothers. Well, we shall see.
Related articles


Talk of a historic day somehow took the edge off what last night's victory really means for Egyptians. Through sheer willpower, through courage in the face of Mubarak's hateful state security police, through the realisation – yes – that sometimes you have to struggle to overthrow a dictator with more than words and facebooks, through the very act of fighting with fists and stones against cops with stun guns and tear gas and live bullets, they achieved the impossible: the end – they must plead with their God that it is permanent – of almost 60 years of autocracy and repression, 30 of them Mubarak's.

Arabs, maligned, cursed, racially abused in the West, treated as backward by many of the Israelis who wanted to maintain Mubarak's often savage rule, had stood up, abandoned their fear, and tossed away the man whom the West loved as a "moderate" leader who would do their bidding at the price of $1.5bn a year. It's not only East Europeans who can stand up to brutality.

con't: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/a-tyrants-exit-a-nations-joy-2212487.html


Egypt is Free' chants Tahrir after Mubarak quits


CAIRO – Cries of "Egypt is free" rang out and fireworks lit up the sky as hundreds of thousands danced, wept and prayed in joyful pandemonium Friday after 18 days of peaceful pro-democracy protests forced President Hosni Mubarak to surrender power to the military, ending three decades of authoritarian rule.

Ecstatic protesters in Cairo's Tahrir, or Liberation, Square hoisted soldiers onto their shoulders and families posed for pictures in front of tanks in streets flooded with people streaming out to celebrate. Strangers hugged each other, some fell to kiss the ground, and others stood stunned in disbelief.

Chants of "Hold your heads high, you're Egyptian" roared with each burst of fireworks overhead.

"I'm 21 years old and this is the first time in my life I feel free," an ebullient Abdul-Rahman Ayyash, born eight years after Mubarak came to power, said as he hugged fellow protesters in Tahrir Square.

An astonishing day in which hundreds of thousands marched on Mubarak's palaces in Cairo and Alexandria and besieged state TV was capped by the military effectively carrying out a coup at the pleas of protesters. After Mubarak's fall, the military, which pledged to shepherd reforms for greater democracy, told the nation it would announce the next steps soon. Those could include the dissolving of parliament and creation of a transitional government.

Mubarak's downfall at the hands of the biggest popular uprising in the modern history of the Arab world had stunning implications for the United States and the West, Israel, and the region, unsettling rulers across the Mideast.

The 82-year-old leader epitomized the complex trade-off the United States was locked into in the Middle East for decades: Support for autocratic leaders in return for stability, a bulwark against Islamic militants, a safeguard of economic interests with the oil-rich Gulf states and peace — or at least an effort at peace — with Israel.

The question for Washington now was whether that same arrangement will hold as the Arab world's most populous state makes a potentially rocky transition to democracy, with no guarantee of the results.

Click image to see photos of celebrations in Egypt


AFP/Marco Longari

At the White House, President Barack Obama said "Egyptians have inspired us." He noted the important questions that lay ahead, but said, "I'm confident the people of Egypt can find the answers."

The United States at times seemed overwhelmed during the upheaval, fumbling to juggle its advocacy of democracy and the right to protest, its loyalty to longtime ally Mubarak and its fears the fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood — or more radical groups — could gain a foothold. Mubarak's fall came 32 years to the day after the collapse of the shah's government in Iran, the prime example of a revolution that turned to Islamic militancy.

In Egypt, persecuted democracy activists frequently denounced the U.S. government for not coming down harder on Mubarak's rights abuses. Washington's mixed messages during the crisis frustrated the young protesters. They argued that while the powerful Brotherhood will have to be allowed to play a future political role, its popularity would be diminished in an open system where other ideologies are freed to outweigh it.

Neighboring Israel watched with the crisis with unease, worried that their 1979 peace treaty could be in danger. It quickly demanded on Friday that post-Mubarak Egypt continue to adhere to it.

Any break seems unlikely in the near term. The military leadership supports the treaty. Anti-Israeli feeling is strong among Egyptians, and a more democratic government may take a tougher line toward Israel in the chronically broken-down peace process. But few call for outright abrogating a treaty that has kept peace after three wars in the past half-century.

From the oil-rich Gulf states in the east to Morocco in the west, regimes both pro- and anti-U.S. could not help but worry they could see a similar upheaval. Several of the region's rulers have made pre-emptive gestures of democratic reform to avert their own protest movements.

The lesson many took: If it could happen in only three weeks in Egypt, where Mubarak's lock on power appeared unshakable, it could happen anywhere. Only a month earlier, Tunisia's president was forced to step down in the face of protests.

"This is the greatest day of my life.", Nobel Peace laureate Mohammed ElBaradei, whose young supporters were among the organizers of the protest movement, told The Associated Press.

"The country has been liberated after decades of repression," he said adding that he expects a "beautiful" transition of power.

Perhaps most surprising was the genesis of the force that overthrew Mubarak.

The protests were started by a small core of secular, liberal youth activists organizing on the Internet who only a few months earlier struggled to gather more than 100 demonstrators at a time. But their work through Facebook and other social network sites over the past few years built greater awareness and bitterness among Egyptians over issues like police abuse and corruption.

"Facebook brought down the regime," said Sally Toma, one of the main protest organizers.

When the online activists called the first major protest, on Jan. 25, they tapped into a public inspired by Tunisia's revolt and thousands turned out, beyond even the organizers' expectations. From there, protests swelled, drawing hundreds of thousands. The Muslim Brotherhood joined in. But far from hijacking the protests as many feared, it often seemed co-opted by the protesters, forced to set aside its hard-line ideology at least for now to adhere to democratic demands.

About 300 people were killed in the course of the turmoil. Police attacked the first protests with water cannons and gunfire and then a force of regime supporters _believed to be paid thugs — assaulted Tahrir trying to dislodge the protesters, only to be beaten back in two days of pitched battles.

Wael Ghonim, a Google Inc. executive who earlier this year secretly created a Facebook page that became a crucial protester organizing forum, said he "went mad" when he heard the news of Mubarak's ouster.

"I expect a bright future. I trust in 80 million Egyptians," Ghonim, who was arrested immediately after the protests began and held for 12 days, told The Associated Press.

Mubarak, a former air force commander came to power after the 1981 assassination of his predecessor Anwar Sadat by Islamic radicals. Throughout his rule, he showed a near obsession with stability, ensuring control through rigged elections, a constitution his regime wrote, a ruling party that monopolized the levers of state, and a hated police force accused of widespread torture.

He resisted calls for reform even as public bitterness grew over corruption, deteriorating infrastructure and rampant poverty in a country where 40 percent live below or near the poverty line.

Throughout the crisis, Mubarak backpedaled with concessions, replacing his government, purging his ruling party and moving to prosecute some of its most unpopular figures. But the moves did nothing to diminish the regime's power — and did not satisfy the steadily swelling protests.

Up to the last hours, Mubarak sought to cling to power, handing some of his authorities to his newly appointed Vice President Omar Suleiman while keeping his title.

But an explosion of protests Friday rejecting the move appeared to have pushed the military into forcing him out completely.

Hundreds of thousands flooded the main squares of cities around the nation. Soldiers stood by, even threw cookies and biscuits to protesters who massed in front of Mubarak's palaces in Cairo and Alexandria, chanting for him to go. Others blockaded the towering State Television and Radio Building overlooking the Nile River in Cairo, blocking employees from entering.

Ahmed Kassam, an engineer, said he marched with crowds for two hours across Cairo from Tahrir to the Oruba palace. "We were shouting at people standing in their balconies and they came down and joined us. We have thousands behind us," he said. "Today I feel that something is going to change. I feel very, very powerful."

Protesters stormed the main security headquarters in southern Egypt's main city Assiut, and two were killed by police opening fire before the province's governor was forced to flee, escorted to safety by the army.

The ousted Mubarak himself flew to his isolated palace in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, 250 miles from the turmoil in Cairo.

Suleiman — who appears to have lost his vice president's post as well in the military takeover — appeared grim as he delivered the short announcement on state TV Friday night that Mubarak was stepping down.

"In these grave circumstances that the country is passing through, President Hosni Mubarak has decided to leave his position as president of the republic," he said. "He has mandated the Armed Forces Supreme Council to run the state. God is our protector and succor."

The question now turned to what happens next. Protesters on Friday had overtly pleaded for the army to oust Mubarak. The country is now ruled by the Armed Forces Supreme Council, consisting of the military's top generals and headed by Defense Minister Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi

After Mubarak's resignation, a military spokesman appeared on state TV and promised the army would not act as a substitute for a government based on the "legitimacy of the people."

He said the military was preparing the next steps needed "to acheive the ambitions of our great nation" and would announce them soon. He praised Mubarak for his contributions to the country. Pointedly, he did not salute his former commander-in-chief. Instead he stood at attention and raised his hand to his cap in a salute to protesters killed in the unrest.

Abdel-Rahman Samir, one of the protest organizers, said the movement would now open negotiations with the military over democratic reforms but vowed protests would continue to ensure change is carried out.

"We still don't have any guarantees yet — if we end the whole situation now, then it's like we haven't done anything," he said. "So we need to keep sitting in Tahrir until we get all our demands."

But, he added, "I feel fantastic. .... I feel like we have worked so hard, we planted a seed for a year and a half and now we are now finally sowing the fruits."

For the moment, concerns over the next step were overwhelmed by the wave of joy and disbelief — and an overwhelming pride that they had waged a peaceful campaign crowned with success.

In Tahrir Square, the crowds of several hundred thousand watched and listed to Suleiman's speech on televisions and on mobile-phone radios. When he finished, they burst into wild cheers, waving flags and chanting "Allahu akbar," or "God is Great" and "the people have brought down the regime."

Spontaneous lines of dancers threaded through the packed mass of people. One man kissed the ground and thanked God while others screamed, "Hosni is gone, Hosni is gone." Around the capital of 18 million, cars honked their horns in celebration.

"I am 42 years old and my children can finally live in free," said Mahmoud Ghandem, who joined the Tahrir protests five days ago from his Nile Delta town of Kafr el-Sheikh.

Outside the Oruba presidential palace, one man sprawled on the grass in shock amid the cheers. Others handed out sweets and waved their hands in V-for-victory signs. The crowd then began to march in a sea of Egyptian flags back to the protest's heart, Tahrir.

Throughout the night, Tahrir Square and the surrounding downtown streets were transformed into a massive party. Thousands streamed in from across the city, jamming bridges over the Nile. Army checkpoints surrounding the square for days melted away as some soldiers threw themselves into the throngs. In the streets, parents took pictures of their children posing with Egyptian flags.

State television, a bastion of unwavering support for Mubarak, had an almost instant change of tone. After disparaging the protesters as foreign-backed troublemakers for days, it began reporting the celebrations as a victory for freedom. Egyptians, one reporter outside Oruba palace proclaimed, "are able to move the waters that have been still for 30 years."

Ala Moussa, a 24-year-old from Alexandria who came Friday to join the Cairo protests, took off his glasses to wipe away tears. He had been shot by a rubber bullet during earlier protests in his hometown.

"For 50 years, it was a police state and we adapted ourselves to it," he said. "The question now is, can we take another route. I hope so."

___
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110211/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_egypt
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« Reply #68 on: Feb 12, 2011 08:41 AM »

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED!

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
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« Reply #69 on: Feb 12, 2011 09:06 AM »

haha good job bro!!! we only have a local paper here but i'll keep it if it has a good picture.

just saw that bottom one at this link, some really emotional beautiful pics! i think this was the former admin of Boston's big picture who moved to a new site:

http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2011/02/three-weeks-in-egypt/6/

and

http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2011/02/egypt-a-new-turning-point-for-the-revolution/100007/
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« Reply #70 on: Feb 12, 2011 09:53 PM »

Whoa! Awesome pictures Sis J!! I love these photo collections you post! :-)

I have to say I love the aerial shots the most - just gives one a sense of how momentous these moments are.

Also, I love blue super baby!!!! SO CUTE!!!!! Ma'sha'allah!

Aww, that bride is beautiful ma'sha'allah and to have the new begi9nning tied in, 3 days later with the nations new beginning, what a way to start things off!


Oh man, the second set of pics - amazing as well! The night picture from above - lovely!

 I am a total sucker when it comes to such things - I hope Life magazine puts on a special edition on this by the summer if not sooner - or some other respectable publication. I have a big LIFE collection as well and New Yorker (when I used to subscribe - oh they could make a creative cover wit this event!)


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« Reply #71 on: Feb 12, 2011 10:19 PM »

Also, one more heart-breaking, yet happy video from the celebrations:

Khaled Said's mother celebrates Egyptian revolution

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
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« Reply #72 on: Feb 12, 2011 11:08 PM »

OMG!!! That video was incredible. The death of her son changed the face of Egypt!! God bless her. SubhanAllah. We've seen such inspiring things it's so amazing.



Here's another one. The people in THE MIDDLE OF PRAYER hear about Mubarak and they continue to pray haha I'm sure they were BURSTING. Then they bust out... A great moment...

start at 3:30 when they first hear, and then 6:45 when they join in
Tahrir Square when Mubarak resigned



And more nice photos:
http://www.facebook.com/album.php?fbid=1842422698783&id=1187047035&aid=107680
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« Reply #73 on: Feb 12, 2011 11:17 PM »

Just finished watch the du'a video you posted above - amazing!!!!

Oh!!! That video sounds amazing, but honestly have to sleep! Will watch first thing in the morning!

Also, u said you saw the bottom picture (so from the Independent) in the first link photos? I couldn't see it - anyways, great pictures again!

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« Reply #74 on: Feb 13, 2011 12:23 AM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

Here's some interesting facts:

Did you know that the date Mubarak resigned, 11 February, was also the date of the Iranian revolution when the Shah was deposed?

Did you know that both events occurred in the month of Rabi ul Awwal?

Did you also know that from a maths perspective both events occurred in calendar years which correspond to prime numbers, namely 1979 & 2011?


Amazing coincidence or something deeper?

Cue Twilight theme Wink

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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