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Author Topic: Libya, you're next inshaAllah!!  (Read 3630 times)
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jannah
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« on: Feb 21, 2011 01:36 PM »


InshaAllah the Qadafi's are the next to go! After all the people they killed I hope they are tried for war crimes! But would Qadafi be sane enough for trial? :p


What a crazy winter this has been!!! Crazy storms, crazy snow, crazy revolutions!! What took so long for the Muslim world to wake up?? Just good timing? Economic depression? Social networking? Convergence of everything? Anyway so happy that we're on the brink of new beginnings!!

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Libya protests: Col Gaddafi under mounting pressure

BBC News


Col Muammar Gaddafi's regime is under pressure amid unprecedented protests in the Libyan capital and defections by senior diplomats.

Protesters out on the streets of Tripoli late on Sunday were met by security forces using live ammunition and tear gas.

Benghazi, the country's second city, now appears to be largely under the control of protesters.

But Col Gaddafi's son, Saif al-Islam, has warned that civil war could ignite.

In a lengthy TV address, he offered significant political reforms but also vowed that the regime would "fight to the last bullet" against "seditious elements".

He acknowledged, though, that the eastern cities of Benghazi and al-Bayda had fallen to the opposition.
'Massacre'

On Monday, reports from Tripoli suggested the streets were mainly quiet, with government forces still patrolling Green Square after crushing protests in what witnesses called a "massacre".

It followed a night of violence between supporters of Col Gaddafi and anti-government protesters.

The situation in Libya is becoming increasingly confused and chaotic. There are several reports that Col Gaddafi has now left Tripoli, possibly for his hometown of Sirt or his desert base of Sabha.

In Tripoli itself, elements of the security forces are still on the streets, though the violence seems to be increasingly random.

During the night, there were more brutal attacks on demonstrators who had gathered, after rumours spread that Col Gaddafi had fled the country.

Hour by hour, there are reports of more defections. Almost all major tribal leaders seem to have joined the opposition, as well as important religious leaders and several senior Libyan ambassadors.

The east of the country is already almost entirely out of the hands of the government. Col Gaddafi's hold on power is becoming weaker by the hour.

Gunfire was heard into the early hours of the morning and firefighters struggled to contain a fire at a central government building, the People's Hall, which was earlier set ablaze.

Libya's envoy to the Arab League, Abdel Moneim al-Honi, announced he was "joining the revolution" and its ambassador to India, Ali al-Essawi, told the BBC he was resigning in protest against his government's violent crackdown on demonstrators.

Mohamed Bayou, who until a month ago was chief spokesman for the Libyan government, said the leadership was wrong to threaten violence against its opponents.

"I hope that [Col Gaddafi's son Saif] will... change his speech to acknowledge the existence of an internal popular opposition, to enter into dialogue with them regarding thorough changes in the Libyan system," Mr Bayou said in a statement obtained by the Reuters news agency that appeared to indicate disagreement within the ruling elite.

In another blow to Col Gaddafi's rule, two tribes - including Libya's largest tribe, the Warfla - have backed the protesters.
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« Reply #1 on: Feb 21, 2011 03:35 PM »

assalaamu alaikum
this has been a crazy winter with all this uprising but are they for the sake of ALLAH (SWT) and to establish islamic rule or are they for something else?

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« Reply #2 on: Feb 21, 2011 08:17 PM »

wsalam,

why does it have to be for islamic rule? is an uprising only legitimate if people are trying to get islamic rule/shariah? what about not being under an oppressive dictator? not being killed for being an "islamist" or any opposition whatsoever? not allowing any freedoms to the people? fighting a wealthy elite that are raping their country to the detriment of the people? i mean seriously.

perhaps you've never lived in any of these countries or know what type of life these people live. they are fighting fee sabeelillah, for their dignity and freedom to live as free human beings with rights. that is islamic.

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« Reply #3 on: Feb 21, 2011 08:24 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

Just seen the latest pictures from Libya which are quite shocking.

It does beg the question on how bad the regime is given that people are willing to sacrifice their lives to topple it.

Stories of paid mercenaries being used to kill protestors and army members being slaughtered for not shooting at their own people are incredulous if true.

If leaders across the Arab world have indeed been guilty of oppression, then it is only a matter of time before they are taken into account.

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #4 on: Feb 21, 2011 11:21 PM »

how should a muslim want to be ruled by or should i say a believer. if all this is going on  and people are being kill and abuse because they want to have the freedom to do those things that is against islam or to establish a government that is not governing by what Allah has decreed should us as muslims really want them to establish any  other type of government except an Islamic one. Yes i feel for my beloved brothers and sisters who are oppress and living under conditions  that i can't imagine (i thank Allah for protecting me from that) but shouldn't  i want better for them and the good.  The Prophet (SAW) came as a mercy to the world, so what he came with is a blessing from Allah and that was Islam as a way of life. And Islamic Law is one of Allah's blessings. so which of the blessings of Allah will you deny.

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« Reply #5 on: Feb 22, 2011 12:01 AM »

(This is directed to anyone with these type of thoughts so take the "you" as a collective "you".)

Yes you're right, a dictator & elite worth 70 billion dollars while the people make less than $2 a day living in grinding poverty is so much better and Islamic. So is killing, torturing, sexually abusing any opposition in the prisons. Very Islamic. We should support them. So is taking men off the streets and making them disappear. So is making sure anyone 'Islamic" is squashed. So is controlling all the Imams, Mosques and khutbas and state run Islamic colleges to state-run approval. Running a brutal police state is obviously what Islam is about.  <sarcasm>

It's the people's right and ISLAMIC right to govern themselves. There is no specific system laid out in Islamic law. Why do people think it's either kuffar system or islam system. They are fighting for their inalienable rights as a Muslim, the right to worship, to protect life and property. Do you even know the purpose of shariah/Islam? It came to protect people's deen, aql, nafs, mal and 'irdhi.

The people under oppression do not have the right to their own deen as mentioned above. Ask yourself why Qaradawi has been banned from Egypt for 30 years. They had no right to aql -everything was state controlled, censored, and opposed. They had no right to their own lives. Please visit the "We are all Khaled Said" page to see how he and others were killed. They had no right to mal protection of their own wealth and property. And they had no 'irdhi dignity as human beings.

So again, are you going to say they are fighting for unIslamic things?

Also, as an aside, ask yourself about where you live. If you don't live in an Islamic state then why don't you. Why aren't you fighting for that? Aren't you living in sin. Criticize yourself first, before you criticize others working towards a better Islamic life that Allah has given and people try to take away.

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« Reply #6 on: Feb 22, 2011 01:45 AM »

let's not confuse the issue i didn't say an oppressor, murder, or any of those things was right or good. i said we as muslims should want to be governed by the laws that Allah Decreed. How can anyone think its the people right to govern themselves. The Prophet (SAW) set up a governship (check the history) that was establish for us as muslim to be govern by and the Book of Allah gives us the guide lines for that. that"s why we have islamic courts and judges. if your not governed by the Book of Allah then what are  you being governed by. and i didn't say some of the things that they was fighting for they shouldn't have but all actions depend on intentions and if their intentions isn't to establish what Allah has commanded then is there any benefit in it?

as a side note: im here where i live trying to live in accordance to what Allah as commanded to the best of my ability. I chose not to go live in so-called Islamic countries because im not being prefended from woshipping Allah how i was prescride to here. if i was prefended from doing that then i would go somewhere else(In sha Allah).

 Narrated Ibn 'Umar: Allah's Apostle said: "I have been ordered (by Allah) to fight against the people until they testify that none has the right to be worshipped but Allah and that Muhammad is Allah's Apostle, and offer the prayers perfectly and give the obligatory charity, so if they perform a that, then they save their lives an property from me except for islamic laws and then their reckoning (accounts) will be done by Allah."  (Book Bukhari #2, Hadith #24)



to make this clear if you dont want to be governed by the Book of Allah then what do you want to be governed by?me as a muslim i want to be governed by what Allah sent down.

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« Reply #7 on: Feb 22, 2011 06:20 AM »

Like I said what they are fighting for is Islamic and the very essentials of Islam. It's unfortunate that others don't see it that way. You know if it were up to people of that mentality the Middle East would never have these types of revolutions. They would die backwards and tortured in the prisons, including and especially all practicing Muslims. A generation in Syria has grown up without fathers. I'd like you to go tell them that what they are fighting for is unislamic. Anyway, Alhamdulillah the people have finally woken up and realize that Allah has given them more rights than the people seem to want to give them.

It's interesting that you think that it's fine to be where you are because you are not prevented from worshiping Allah. Then why aren't those people fine under whatever government they want.  If they want a secular democracy I'm sure you probably live in one as well. So anyway if it's not OK for them it's not OK for you right. As for that hadith by Umar radiahu which is the most wrongly used hadith out there, if you believe it has that meaning then why aren't you doing it? You're obviously not living that hadith and everything you do to improve your life, your family and everything else is against Islam, just like you think everything going on in Egypt, Libya etc is against Islam.

If you hadn't heard lately there is no khilafah. If you are someone who believes the only valid option is to fight for khilafah that's a whole other thing. Reams of books have been written refuting this concept. The people have to be in a state of Islam before anyone can even try to impose an Islamic state. Even Hizbut Tahrir knows it's goals have to go in steps starting 1. with educating people.  It's just simply amazing and baffling to me how someone could think fighting to feed their children is unislamic. To fight brutality is unislamic? To fight killing and corruption is unislamic?

BTW the Muslim Brotherhood also joined this revolution. Guess they are unislamic too. As did shaykhs at al-azhar and other Imams, and Shaikh Qaradawi and Muhammad Jibreel. Guess they are unislamic too.

Allah mustaan. My prayers are with the people fighting in the middle east for their freedom and dignity.


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« Reply #8 on: Feb 22, 2011 06:47 AM »

Yeah considered so unislamic by some...

BBC News - Today - Libyan protesters want 'basic human rights'
http://news.bbc.co.uk/today/hi/today/newsid_9403000/9403364.stm

More news and videos from Libya: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=108581165885196 Warning explicit pictures


Interview with someone in Libya: [Message From Libya]TELL THE WORLD WHAT IS HAPPENING TO US!!!!!.flv
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« Reply #9 on: Feb 22, 2011 06:49 AM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

It's one thing to hear about oppression but another thing entirely when you experience it or at least see it for yourself.

It reminds me of the Hadith of the person who kept a cat and would neither feed it nor let it go free so it could catch it's own food.

When you think of the abject poverty that people are living in the Muslim world and then of the luxury that their leaders are abiding in, there clearly has to be something wrong.

When you have Libyan diplomats quitting the Embassy in London and joining the protestors there has to be something wrong.

When you have fighter pilots escaping the Libya with their planes and fleeing to other countries, there has to be something wrong.

Leaders have a responsibility to their people and to uphold and maintain the Divine rights given to them by Allah.

Whether we like it or not, think it's correct or not, if you oppress a people for long enough, they will snap.

After 41 years of dictatorship and barely seeing the benefits of the huge oil wealth which the country has, the people of Libya have clearly snapped.

Would we react any differently I wonder if we had been persecuted for 41 years? It's a bit too simplistic, sometimes, to reduce this argument to one over governorship when peoples basic daily needs are not being fulfilled.


Obviously it will be Allah who ultimately decides between the disputing parties and only He knows best.

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #10 on: Feb 22, 2011 11:26 AM »

its amazing how people try to put words in other peoples mouths trying to better yourself and feeding your family and wanting the things that Allah has promise you is not against islam. But we as muslims our first question should be are we doing whatever we do for the sake of Allah. im not saying the conditions my brothers and sisters went through and is still going through don't give them the right to want to fight for change. i'm saying me as a muslim i want a change that would benefit them on the day when they stand in front of their Lord (SWT). and if this isn't what you want for them you need to check what is in your heart. Ofcourse these uprisings are a good thing because they where done by the Will of Allah. i just want them to be for a blessing and not for a punshment.

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« Reply #11 on: Feb 22, 2011 04:20 PM »

As Salaam alaikum all,

First, in the midst of differing opnions, I think we can all agree to at least make du'a that the people that have had to live in brutal oppression and tyranny will have an outcome that good and beneficial to them....It is easy to judge people we do not know, who have lived in circumstances we have never had to endure. Allah knows best what they are able to accomplish given their understanding and resources.

im not saying the conditions my brothers and sisters went through and is still going through don't give them the right to want to fight for change.

as a side note: im here where i live trying to live in accordance to what Allah as commanded to the best of my ability. I chose not to go live in so-called Islamic countries because im not being prefended from woshipping Allah how i was prescride to here. if i was prefended from doing that then i would go somewhere else(In sha Allah).

Br. Syid, if I understand correctly, you have actively chosen to live in the west because living in a place where you are prevented from worshipping Allah is worse than living in a place where you are not prevented from practicing your Deen. You would probably agree then that to change one's state from being prevented from practiing the Deen to a state in which a person is not prevented from practicing their Deen is to actively improve one's situation.

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« Reply #12 on: Feb 22, 2011 06:37 PM »

as-salaamu alaikum sis

i can agree with that, i'm not saying the fight is not a good fight i'm just saying in the end let it be for the betterment of the people. and what would be more beneficial than living in accordance to what Allah sent down.

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« Reply #13 on: Feb 22, 2011 07:17 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

Just saw the clips from the Ghadaffi speech.

It does seem Tripoli is heading for mass bloodshed with an apparent shoot to kill policy from these foreign mercenaries on the streets.

People are obviously scared and don't want to venture out. May Allah protect them.




Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #14 on: Feb 23, 2011 03:04 AM »

Great articles from Robert Fisk over these last few weeks! Must be an amazing time for him. Definitely more insightful than any other commentators.

==============================

Robert Fisk: Gaddafi raved and cursed, but he faces forces he cannot control

http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/fisk/robert-fisk-gaddafi-raved-and-cursed-but-he-faces-forces-he-cannot-control-2222904.html

Wednesday, 23 February 2011

So he will go down fighting. That's what Muammar Gaddafi told us last night, and most Libyans believe him. This will be no smooth flight to Riyadh or a gentle trip to a Red Sea holiday resort. Raddled, cowled in desert gowns, he raved on.

He had not even begun to use bullets against his enemies – a palpable lie – and "any use of force against the authority of the state shall be punished by death", in itself a palpable truth which Libyans knew all too well without the future tense of Gaddafi's threat. On and on and on he ranted. Like everything Gaddafi, it was very impressive – but went on far too long.

He cursed the people of Benghazi who had already liberated their city – "just wait until the police return to restore order", this dessicated man promised without a smile. His enemies were Islamists, the CIA, the British and the "dogs" of the international press. Yes, we are always dogs, aren't we? I was long ago depicted in a Bahraini newspaper cartoon (Crown Prince, please note) as a rabid dog, worthy of liquidation. But like Gaddafi's speeches, that's par for the course. And then came my favourite bit of the whole Gaddafi exegesis last night: HE HADN'T EVEN BEGUN TO USE VIOLENCE YET!

So let's erase all the YouTubes and Facebooks and the shooting and blood and gouged corpses from Benghazi, and pretend it didn't happen. Let's pretend that the refusal to give visas to foreign correspondents has actually prevented us from hearing the truth. Gaddafi's claim that the protesters in Libya – the millions of demonstrators – "want to turn Libya into an Islamic state" is exactly the same nonsense that Mubarak peddled before the end in Egypt, the very same nonsense that Obama and La Clinton have suggested. Indeed, there were times last night when Gaddafi – in his vengefulness, his contempt for Arabs, for his own people – began to sound very like the speeches of Benjamin Netanyahu. Was there some contact between these two rogues, one wondered, that we didn't know about?

In many ways, Gaddafi's ravings were those of an old man, his fantasies about his enemies – "rats who have taken tablets" who included "agents of Bin Laden" – were as disorganised as the scribbled notes on the piece of paper he held in his right hand, let alone the green-covered volume of laws from which he kept quoting. It was not about love. It was about the threat of execution. "Damn those" trying to stir unrest against Libya. It was a plot, an international conspiracy. "Your children are dying – but for what?" He would fight "until the last drop of my blood with the Libyan people is behind me". America was the enemy (much talk of Fallujah), Israel was the enemy, Sadat was an enemy, colonial fascist Italy was the enemy. Among the heroes and friends was Gaddafi's grandfather, "who fell a martyr in 1911" against the Italian enemy.

Dressed in brown burnous and cap and gown, Gaddafi's appearance last night raised some odd questions. Having kept the international media – the "dogs" in question – out of Libya, he allowed the world to observe a crazed nation: YouTube and blogs of terrible violence versus state television pictures of an entirely unhinged dictator justifying what he had either not seen on YouTube or hadn't been shown. And there's an interesting question here: dictators and princes who let the international press into their countries – Messrs Ben Ali/Mubarak/Saleh/Prince Salman – are permitting it to film their own humiliation. Their reward is painful indeed. But sultans like Gaddafi who keep the journos out fare little different.

The hand-held immediacy of the mobile phone, the intimacy of sound and the crack of gunfire are in some ways more compelling than the edited, digital film of the networks. Exactly the same happened in Gaza when the Israelis decided, Gaddafi-like, to keep foreign journalists out of their 2009 bloodletting: the bloggers and YouTubers (and Al Jazeera) simply gave us a reality we didn't normally experience from the "professional" satellite boys. Perhaps, in the end, it takes a dictator with his own monopoly on cameras to tell the truth. "I will die as a martyr," Gaddafi said last night. Almost certainly true.



Cruel. Vainglorious. Steeped in blood. And now, surely, after more than four decades of terror and oppression, on his way out?

Robert Fisk on Muammar Gaddafi, tyrant of Tripoli
Tuesday, 22 February 2011
http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/fisk/cruel-vainglorious-steeped-in-blood-and-now-surely-after-more-than-four-decades-of-terror-and-oppression-on-his-way-out-2221687.html


So even the old, paranoid, crazed fox of Libya – the pallid, infantile, droop-cheeked dictator from Sirte, owner of his own female praetorian guard, author of the preposterous Green Book, who once announced he would ride to a Non-Aligned Movement summit in Belgrade on his white charger – is going to ground. Or gone. Last night, the man I first saw more than three decades ago, solemnly saluting a phalanx of black-uniformed frogmen as they flappered their way across the sulphur-hot tarmac of Green Square on a torrid night in Tripoli during a seven-hour military parade, appeared to be on the run at last, pursued – like the dictators of Tunis and Cairo – by his own furious people.

The YouTube and Facebook pictures told the story with a grainy, fuzzed reality, fantasy turned to fire and burning police stations in Benghazi and Tripoli, to corpses and angry, armed men, of a woman with a pistol leaning from a car door, of a crowd of students – were they readers of his literature? – breaking down a concrete replica of his ghastly book. Gunfire and flames and cellphone screams; quite an epitaph for a regime we all, from time to time, supported.

And here, just to lock our minds on to the brain of truly eccentric desire, is a true story. Only a few days ago, as Colonel Muammar Gaddafi faced the wrath of his own people, he met with an old Arab acquaintance and spent 20 minutes out of four hours asking him if he knew of a good surgeon to lift his face. This is – need I say it about this man? – a true story. The old boy looked bad, sagging face, bloated, simply "magnoon" (mad), a comedy actor who had turned to serious tragedy in his last days, desperate for the last make-up lady, the final knock on the theatre door.

In the event, Saif al-Islam al-Gaddafi, faithful understudy for his father, had to stand in for him on stage as Benghazi and Tripoli burned, threatening "chaos and civil war" if Libyans did not come to heel. "Forget oil, forget gas," this wealthy nincompoop announced. "There will be civil war."

Above the beloved son's head on state television, a green Mediterranean appeared to ooze from his brain. Quite an obituary, when you come to think of it, of nearly 42 years of Gaddafi rule.

Not exactly King Lear, who would "do such things – what they are, yet I know not, but they shall be the terrors of the earth"; more like another dictator in a different bunker, summoning up non-existent armies to save him in his capital, ultimately blaming his own people for his calamity. But forget Hitler. Gaddafi was in a class of his own, Mickey Mouse and Prophet, Batman and Clark Gable and Anthony Quinn playing Omar Mukhtar in Lion of the Desert, Nero and Mussolini (the 1920s version) and, inevitably – the greatest actor of them all – Muammar Gaddafi. He wrote a book – appropriately titled in his present unfortunate circumstances – called Escape to Hell and Other Stories and demanded a one state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict which would be called "Israeltine".

Shortly thereafter, he threw half the Palestinian residents of Libya out of his country and told them to walk home to their lost land. He stormed out of the Arab League because he deemed it irrelevant – a brief moment of sanity there, one has to admit – and arrived in Cairo for a summit, deliberately confusing a lavatory door with that of the conference chamber until led aside by the Caliph Mubarak who had a thin, suffering smile on his face.

And if what we are witnessing is a true revolution in Libya, then we shall soon be able – unless the Western embassy flunkies get there first for a spot of serious, desperate looting – to rifle through the Tripoli files and read the Libyan version of Lockerbie and the 1989 UTA Flight 722 plane bombing; and of the Berlin disco bombings, for which a host of Arab civilians and Gaddafi's own adopted daughter were killed in America's 1986 revenge raids; and of his IRA arms supplies and of his assassination of opponents at home and abroad, and of the murder of a British policewoman, and of his invasion of Chad and the deals with British oil magnates; and (woe betide us all at this point) of the truth behind the grotesque deportation of the soon-to-expire al-Megrahi, the supposed Lockerbie bomber too ill to die, who may, even now, reveal some secrets which the Fox of Libya – along with Gordon Brown and the Attorney General for Scotland, for all are equal on the Gaddafi world stage – would rather we didn't know about.

And who knows what the Green Book Archives – and please, O insurgents of Libya, do NOT in thy righteous anger burn these priceless documents – will tell us about Lord Blair's supine visit to this hideous old man; an addled figure whose "statesmanlike" gesture (the words, of course, come from that old Marxist fraud Jack Straw, when the author of Escape to Hell promised to hand over the nuclear nick-nacks which his scientists had signally failed to turn into a bomb) allowed our own faith-based Leader to claim that, had we not smitten the Saddamites with our justified anger because of their own non-existent weapons of mass destruction, Libya, too, would have joined the Axis of Evil.

Alas, Lord Blair paid no heed to the Gaddafi "whoops" factor, a unique ability to pose as a sane man while secretly believing oneself – like miss-a-heart-beat Omar Suleiman in Cairo – to be a light bulb. Only days after the Blair handshake, the Saudis accused Gaddafi of plotting – and the details, by the way, were horribly convincing – to murder Britain's ally, King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia. But why be surprised when the man most feared and now most mocked and hated by his own vengeful people wrote, in the aforesaid Escape to Hell that Christ's crucifixion was a historical falsehood and that – as here I say again, a faint ghost of truth does very occasionally adhere to Gaddafi's ravings – a German "Fourth Reich" was lording it over Britain and America? Reflecting on death in this thespian work, he asks if the Grim Reaper is male or female. The leader of the Great Libyan Arab People's Popular Masses, needless to say, seemed to favour the latter.

As with all Middle East stories, a historical narrative precedes the dramatic pageant of Gaddafi's fall. For decades, his opponents tried to kill him; they rose up as nationalists, as prisoners in his torture chambers, as Islamists on the streets of – yes! – Benghazi. And he smote them all down. Indeed, this venerable city had already achieved its martyrdom status in 1979 when Gaddafi publicly hanged dissident students in Benghazi's main square. I am not even mentioning the 1993 disappearance of Libyan human rights defender Mansour al-Kikhiya while attending a Cairo conference after complaining about Gaddafi's execution of political prisoners. And it is important to remember that, 42 years ago, our own Foreign Office welcomed Gaddafi's coup against the effete and corrupt King Idriss because, said our colonial mandarins, it was better to have a spick-and-span colonel in charge of an oil state than a relic of imperialism. Indeed, they showed almost as much enthusiasm as they did for this decaying despot when Lord Blair arrived in Tripoli decades later for the laying on of hands.

As a Libyan opposition group told us years ago – we didn't care about these folks then, of course – "Gaddafi would have us believe he is at the vanguard of every human development that has emerged during his lifetime".

All true, if now reduced to sub-Shakespearean farce. My kingdom for a facelift. At that non-aligned summit in Belgrade, Gaddafi even flew in a planeload of camels to provide him with fresh milk. But he was not allowed to ride his white charger. Tito saw to that. Now there was a real dictator.
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« Reply #15 on: Feb 24, 2011 03:20 PM »

Ugh....... horrible. Time for us to make some major dua for the LIbyan people  bropraying bropraying bropraying

===========================

Robert Fisk with the first dispatch from
Tripoli - a city in the shadow of death


Gunfire in the suburbs – and hunger and rumour in the capital as thousands race for last tickets out of a city sinking into anarchy

Thursday, 24 February 2011

A fire burns in a street in the Libyan capital Tripoli in the early hours of yesterday morning
Up to 15,000 men, women and children besieged Tripoli's international airport last night, shouting and screaming for seats on the few airliners still prepared to fly to Muammar Gaddafi's rump state, paying Libyan police bribe after bribe to reach the ticket desks in a rain-soaked mob of hungry, desperate families. Many were trampled as Libyan security men savagely beat those who pushed their way to the front.

Among them were Gaddafi's fellow Arabs, thousands of them Egyptians, some of whom had been living at the airport for two days without food or sanitation. The place stank of faeces and urine and fear. Yet a 45-minute visit into the city for a new airline ticket to another destination is the only chance to see Gaddafi's capital if you are a "dog" of the international press.

There was little sign of opposition to the Great Leader. Squads of young men with Kalashnikov rifles stood on the side roads next to barricades of upturned chairs and wooden doors. But these were pro-Gaddafi vigilantes – a faint echo of the armed Egyptian "neighbourhood guard" I saw in Cairo a month ago – and had pinned photographs of their leader's infamous Green Book to their checkpoint signs.

There is little food in Tripoli, and over the city there fell a blanket of drab, sullen rain. It guttered onto an empty Green Square and down the Italianate streets of the old capital of Tripolitania. But there were no tanks, no armoured personnel carriers, no soldiers, not a fighter plane in the air; just a few police and elderly men and women walking the pavements – a numbed populace. Sadly for the West and for the people of the free city of Benghazi, Libya's capital appeared as quiet as any dictator would wish.

But this is an illusion. Petrol and food prices have trebled; entire towns outside Tripoli have been torn apart by fighting between pro- and anti-Gaddafi forces. In the suburbs of the city, especially in the Noufreen district, militias fought for 24 hours on Sunday with machine guns and pistols, a battle the Gadaffi forces won. In the end, the exodus of expatriates will do far more than street warfare to bring down the regime.

I was told that at least 30,000 Turks, who make up the bulk of the Libyan construction and engineering industry, have now fled the capital, along with tens of thousands of other foreign workers. On my own aircraft out of Tripoli, an evacuation flight to Europe, there were Polish, German, Japanese and Italian businessmen, all of whom told me they had closed down major companies in the past week. Worse still for Gaddafi, the oil, chemical and uranium fields of Libya lie to the south of "liberated" Benghazi. Gaddafi's hungry capital controls only water resources, so a temporary division of Libya, which may have entered Gaddafi's mind, would not be sustainable. Libyans and expatriates I spoke to yesterday said they thought he was clinically insane, but they expressed more anger at his son, Saif al-Islam. "We thought Saif was the new light, the 'liberal'", a Libyan businessman sad to me. "Now we realise he is crazier and more cruel than his father."

The panic that has now taken hold in what is left of Gaddafi's Libya was all too evident at the airport. In the crush of people fighting for tickets, one man, witnessed by an evacuated Tokyo car-dealer, was beaten so viciously on the head that "his face fell apart".

Talking to Libyans in Tripoli and expatriates at the airport, it is clear that neither tanks nor armour were used in the streets of Tripoli. Air attacks targeted Benghazi and other towns, but not the capital. Yet all spoke of a wave of looting and arson by Libyans who believed that with the fall of Benghazi, Gaddafi was finished and the country open to anarchy.

The centre of the city was largely closed up. All foreign offices have been shut including overseas airlines, and every bakery I saw was shuttered. Rumours abound that members of Gaddafi's family are trying to flee abroad. Although William Hague's ramblings about Gaddafi's flight to Venezuela have been disproved, I spoke to a number of Libyans who believed that Burkina Faso might be his only viable retreat. Two nights ago, a Libyan private jet approached Beirut airport with a request to land but was refused permission when the crew declined to identify their eight passengers. And last night, a Libyan Arab Airlines flight reported by Al Jazeera to be carrying Gaddafi's daughter, Aisha, was refused permission to land in Malta.

Gaddafi is blamed by Shia Muslims in Lebanon, Iraq and Iran for the murder of Imam Moussa Sadr, a supposedly charismatic divine who unwisely accepted an invitation to visit Gaddafi in 1978 and, after an apparent argument about money, was never seen again. Nor was a Lebanese journalist accompanying him on the trip.

While dark humour has never been a strong quality in Libyans, there was one moment at Tripoli airport yesterday which proved it does exist. An incoming passenger from a Libyan Arab Airlines flight at the front of an immigration queue bellowed out: "And long life to our great leader Muammar Gaddafi." Then he burst into laughter – and the immigration officers did the same.
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« Reply #16 on: Feb 24, 2011 06:05 PM »

CNN reporter Ben Wedeman's report after being first Western reporter to enter Libya. Amazing scene...

Huge Rally in Benghazi, Libya (2.24.11) (The video's owner prevents external embedding)
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« Reply #17 on: Feb 25, 2011 12:21 AM »

Here's the nasheed the protesters sing at the beginning... (does anyone know the translation/transliteration? )

tahirah


نشيد :: سوف نبقى هنا :: جميل جدا و رااائع !!



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« Reply #18 on: Mar 03, 2011 08:01 AM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

As with Mubarak, it's amazing how much wealth the ruling family have amassed over these last 41 years.

We know in Islam that we will be questioned not only on how we spent our wealth but also on how we attained it.


On a different note, looking at the pictures of the makeshift refugee camps on the Libyan border really does make one reflect on how much diversity we have in this world. It also reinforces how one's life can be altered in an instant!!


May Allah help all those who are oppressed and may He grant them ease.


Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #19 on: Mar 03, 2011 08:13 AM »

wsalam,

qaddafi and family are not willing to give up anything. they'd rather kill every person till the last drop of blood like they said. are they not mass murderers? i know intervention has not helped these countries before, but really the US has invaded for a LOT less and with no moral imperative. this is so sad. i could not understand why sh. al qaradawi released a fatwa over qaddafi, but now I see it is one man or genocide of an entire people. Which is worse?

More pics:

http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2011/03/battles-across-libya/100018/
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« Reply #20 on: Mar 19, 2011 09:48 PM »

Airstrikes begin on Libya targets

French warplanes have hit four tanks used by forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi on the outskirts of the opposition stronghold of Benghazi, on a day when opposition fighters in the city reported coming under constant artillery and mortar fire.

The US has also launched cruise missiles from ships based in the Mediterrannean Sea, and has taken the lead in military operations during the first phase, Kimberly Halkett, Al Jazeera's correspondent in Washington DC reported.

The action marks the first international military moves against the Libyan leader, and it comes a day after the UN Security Council authorised a no-fly zone over the North African country.

In the first phase of the operation, named "Odyssey Dawn", the US will target Libyan Integrated Missile Defence Systems, mainly near Tripoli and Misurata, officials said. French aircraft had initiated operations by targetting Libyan air fields.

It is not clear when the second wave of operations will begin, but Al Jazeera's Halkett reported that it would target Gaddafi's ground forces and tanks.

Other countries involved in military operations at this stage include Canada, the United Kingdom, France and Italy.

A spokesman for the French military had confirmed that his country's fighter jets have attacked another vehicle belonging to Gaddafi's forces.

"The vehicle was clearly identified as being enemy," army spokesman Colonel Thierry Burckhard said after the first UN-mandated air strike, describing the target as "a vehicle that was threatening the civilian population".

Alain Juppe, the French foreign minister, said that operations "will continue over the next few days" until the Gaddafi government complies with UN Resolution 1973.

Libyan state television reported that civilian targets in Tripoli had been bombarded, as well as fuel stores in Misurata. The state news agency reported that there had been "civilian casualties as a result of this aggression".

The US says that no coalition military operations are currently planned for near the opposition stronghold of Benghazi, but that a no-fly zone will include Tripoli, Sabha, Natoura, Misurata and Benghazi.

Earlier on Saturday, pro-government forces had entered the western outskirts of the city, while French Rafale and Mirage fighter jets began reconnaissance overflights of "all Libyan territory".

Ahmad Shabani, a spokesman for the Libyan opposition's national council, told Al Jazeera the opposition was heartened by the move.

"We are very happy about that, hopefully it's not late... and hopefully it makes a difference," he said.

Witnesses in Bengazi, in the east of the country, said they heard large explosions on Saturday. Al Jazeera's correspondents in the city reported multiple explosions, plumes of smoke in the sky and a fighter jet belonging to the opposition getting shot down


Read the Libya Live Blog
Government troops reportedly bombed the southern Benghazi suburb of Goreshi among other places. Artillery and mortars were also fired in the centre of the city.

Mustafa Abdel Jalil, head of the opposition National Libyan Council, told Al Jazeera "there is a bombardment by artillery and rockets on all districts of Benghazi".

James Bays, Al Jazeera''s correspondent in Benghazi, reported that while the air strikes by international planes were not evident, people were "cheered" by the report. He said, however, that there was a prevalent atmosphere of nervousness and fear, as well.

Government denials

The Libyan government firmly denied that it was attacking the city on Saturday. "There are no attacks whatesover on Benghazi. As we said, we are observing the ceasefire," Musa Ibrahim, a government spokesman, told the Reuters news agency.

Khaled Kaim, Libya's deputy foreign minister, told the BBC "the ceasefire is real, credible and solid. We are willing to receive [international] observers as soon as possible".


On Saturday, Moussa Khoussa, the foreign minister, requested Ban Ki-moon, the United Nations chief, to send observers to monitor the "ceasefire", saying that his country has "fulfilled all of its obligations to the international community".

But Ibrahim Jibreel, a Libyan political activist, told Al Jazeera "we need to first consider the source" when receiving information about Libya. He said the government has "demonstrated their ability and willingness to lie time and time again".

Besides Benghazi, fresh fighting was reported on Saturday in the nearby town of Ajdabiyah, while fierce battles raged in the western town of Misurata.

Reports also indicated that pro-Gaddafi forces had attacked the town of Az Zintan.

Meanwhile, Abdel Fatah Younis, the former interior minister who left Gaddafi''s government to join the opposition, has denied reports on Libyan state television that he has rejoined the government.

Ibrahim, the government spokesman, told reporters on Saturday that Gaddafi had sent urgent messages to the US president, the French president and the British prime minister, as well as the secretary-general of the UN.

Meanwhile, in the capital, Tripoli, pro-Gaddafi demonstrators held rallies, with several hundred gathered at his Bab al-Aziziyah palace saying that they were there to protect the site from any possible air strikes, Al Jazeera correspondent Anita McNaught reported.

The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) warned on Saturday that civilians were at high risk, and called upon all parties involved to respect international humanitarian law.

"As airstrikes in Libya by international forces begin, the ICRC calls upon all parties - the international forces, the Libyan government forces, and the armed opposition - to abide strictly by the rules and principles of
international humanitarian law," the ICRC said in a statement.

Source: Al Jazeera and agencies
http://english.aljazeera.net/news/africa/2011/03/2011319175243968135.html

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
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« Reply #21 on: Mar 20, 2011 06:35 AM »

i love obama   Smiley

people here (in a muslim country) are going "what the hell!"  they are saying this is another US imperialist attempt to control the world.  this really upsets me.  people are so anti-American that it is just pathetic.

i'll say it again:  obama is a godsend.  i love obama.  first tunisia then egypt, and now libya.  who's next? i hope the House of Saud is crapping its pants. 

btw: did you notice how chavez, and guys in South America are condemning the cruise missile attack?  maybe its not a coincidence that South America is flooding the world with drugs and creating such havoc in societies around the world. they're just a bunch of corrupt garbagemen leeching their countries.

assalamualaikum
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« Reply #22 on: Mar 20, 2011 03:34 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

Interesting blog from Sh Hamza Yusuf on his experiences and thoughts on Libya.

http://www.sandalaproductions.com/Blog.aspx


I don't remember having ever imprecated against anyone by name since becoming a Muslim, but now I find myself asking God to give Ghaddafi what he deserves for the terror and suffering he has inflicted upon "his people."

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #23 on: Mar 20, 2011 07:59 PM »

 :'(
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« Reply #24 on: Mar 26, 2011 09:16 PM »

Libyan woman alleges rape by government troops

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
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