// Syrian Protests - High Death Toll
    Peace be upon you,
    Welcome to Madinat Al-Muslimeen, the City of the Muslims. Please feel free to visit the different hot spots around the Madina and post any discussion, articles, suggestions, comments, art, poetry, events, recipes, etc etc. Basically anything you would like to share with your sisters and brothers!! Non-muslims are also of course quite welcome to share their comments. If this is your first time here, you need to register with the city council. Once you register you have 15 days to post your mandatory introduction and then you will be upgraded to a Madina Citizen, God Willing. Please note that our city does have regulations which are listed in the city constitution. Read them carefully before moving in. P.S. - You can also post anonymously if you wish. P.S.S. - Also be sure to check out our ARCHIVES from 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 & 2007. :)

Random Quote: Gratitude: The Prophet said: 'Contemplate those who have less than you and not those who have more than you, lest you belittle the favors of Allah conferred upon you'. (Sahîh Bukhârî, Sahîh Muslim)
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Syrian Protests - High Death Toll  (Read 5042 times)
0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.
tahirah
Sis
Full Member
*

Reputation Power: 19
tahirah has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 202


« on: Apr 24, 2011 06:29 AM »




120 dead after 2 days of unrest in Syria


By BASSEM MROUE and ELIZABETH A. KENNEDY, Associated Press Bassem Mroue And Elizabeth A. Kennedy, Associated Press – 1 hr 38 mins ago
BEIRUT – Syrian security forces fired on funeral processions that drew tens of thousands Saturday, one day after the bloodiest crackdown so far in the uprising against President Bashar Assad. The shootings pushed the two-day death toll to more than 120 and two lawmakers and a religious leader resigned in disgust over the killings.

The resignations were a possible sign of cracks developing in the regime's base in a nation where nearly all opposition figures have been either jailed or exiled during the 40-year dynasty of the Assad family.

"I cannot tolerate the blood of our innocent sons and children being shed," Sheikh Rizq Abdul-Rahim Abazeid told The Associated Press after stepping down from his post as the mufti of the Daraa region in southern Syria.

The lawmakers, Nasser Hariri and Khalil Rifai, also are from Daraa, which has become the epicenter of the protest movement after a group of teenagers were arrested there for scrawling anti-regime graffiti on a wall in mid-March.

Since then, the relentless crackdown on demonstrations has only served to invigorate protesters whose rage over the bloodshed has all but eclipsed their earlier demands for modest reforms. Now, many are seeking Assad's downfall.

Each Friday, growing numbers of people in cities across the country have taken to the streets despite swift attacks from security forces and shadowy pro-government gunmen known as "shabiha."

Ammar Qurabi, the head of Syria's National Organization for Human Rights, said 112 people were killed Friday and at least 11 on Saturday. Friday was by far the deadliest day of the uprising, with security forces beating back protesters with bullets, tear gas and stun guns.

"If I cannot protect the chests of my people from these treacherous strikes, then there is no meaning for me to stay in the People's Assembly. I declare my resignation," Hariri told Al-Jazeera in a televised interview.

Radwan Ziadeh, a visiting scholar at the Institute for Middle East Studies at George Washington University, said the resignations were largely symbolic because the parliament has no real power. But their dissent could encourage others to step down, such as Vice President Farouk al-Sharaa, who is from Daraa, Ziadeh said.

He added Assad met with the lawmakers in recent weeks, promising them that security forces would not shoot protesters.

The uprising in Syria takes its inspiration from the popular revolts that toppled the leaders in Egypt and Tunisia. But Syria is a highly unpredictable country, in part because of its sizable minority population, the loyalty of the country's military and the regime's web of allegiances to powerful forces including Lebanon's Hezbollah and Shiite powerhouse Iran.

Serious, prolonged unrest in Syria would almost inevitably hurt Hezbollah and weaken Iran's influence in the region. But it is not at all clear what factions would have the upper hand if a power vacuum emerges in Syria. There are no organized, credible opposition leaders who can rally followers on the ground or be considered as a possible successor.

The heavy security crackdown on Friday and Saturday came after Assad warned a week ago that any further unrest would be considered "sabotage" after he made the gesture of lifting long-hated emergency laws, which gave security forces almost blanket powers for surveillance and arrest.

One man who took part in Friday's protests outside Damascus said the country's security forces are everywhere.

"The garbage collectors are intelligence agents," he told the AP in a telephone interview. "Sometimes we think even our wives are working with the intelligence. All the phones are monitored. We live in hell."

Another man said plainclothes officers are becoming more apparent in the crowds, with security agents wearing orange bracelets so other agents don't mistakenly hit them with stun guns.

The snipers, he said, wore yellow pieces of cloth on their shoulders.

The witness accounts could not be independently confirmed because Syria has expelled journalists and restricted access to trouble spots. Witnesses spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals.

Elias Muhanna, a political analyst at Harvard University, said the protests have crossed a threshold and serious pressure could be building on Assad.

The protest movement has been the gravest challenge to the autocratic regime led by Assad, who inherited power from his father 11 years ago in one of the most rigidly controlled countries in the Middle East.

"It remains to be seen whether this was a tipping point in the struggle between the opposition and the regime," said Muhanna, author of the Lebanese affairs blog Qifa Nabki. "But one thing is certain: The regime can no longer claim that the demonstrations are a fringe phenomenon."

Assad has blamed most of the unrest on a "foreign conspiracy" and armed thugs trying to sow sectarian strife. Fears of sectarianism resonate in Syria, with the dangers of fractured societies so apparent in neighboring Iraq and Lebanon.

Unknown assailants attacked a security checkpoint in the southern town of Nawa on Saturday, killing five people, the state news agency reported, quoting a military official. Two of the attackers were also killed in a shootout. It described the attackers as an "armed criminal group."

Besides the government crackdown, Assad has been trying to defuse the protests by offering a series of concessions: granting citizenship to thousands among Syria's long-ostracized Kurdish minority, firing local officials, releasing detainees and forming a new government. The recent lifting of emergency laws once had been a top demand.

But many protesters said the concessions have come too late and that Assad does not even deserve the credit because the protest movement is forcing his hand.

The increasing death toll also has brought international condemnation.

In Washington on Friday, President Barack Obama condemned the latest use of force by Syria against anti-government demonstrators and said the regime's "outrageous" use of violence must "end now."

Syria's state TV quoted an unnamed official as saying Damascus "regrets" Obama's comments.

"They are not based on an objective vision," the official said, without elaborating.



http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110424/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_syria
Cinders
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 25
Cinders barely matters :(Cinders barely matters :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 397



« Reply #1 on: Apr 24, 2011 08:23 AM »

It's very sad.

وَلَسَوْفَ يُعْطِيكَ رَبُّكَ فَتَرْضَىٰ

And soon will your Lord give you so that you shall be well pleased.
Al Qur'an (93:5)
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #2 on: Apr 25, 2011 08:07 PM »

More killed and now they are sealing the borders!! Very scary. Praying for the Syrian people Sad Sad They're calling it an absolute catastrophe on a human rights level  :'( :'(
BrKhalid
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 27
BrKhalid barely matters :(BrKhalid barely matters :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 1352



« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2011 11:52 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

With all that's going on at the moment, it's easy to forget that people are being killed in Syria.

The link below tells of a demonstration in London against the Assad regime and what they are currently doing.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-13323467


Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #4 on: Jun 01, 2011 07:42 PM »

This regime has no respect for human life. Horrible to read about these things in that beautiful land Sad

===================



Teenage victim becomes a symbol for Syria's revolution


Mutilated body of Hamza al-Khatib given to family as state TV says injuries were faked by conspirators

   Guardian

The US state department says reports of the torture of a 13-year-old Syrian boy are horrifying Link to this video

The new face of the Syrian revolution is chubby, has a winning smile and belongs to a 13-year-old named Hamza al-Khatib.

The boy, from a village called al-Jizah near the southern city of Deraa, has become the most famous victim yet of Syria's bloody chapter of the Arab spring.

Hamza was picked up by security forces on 29 April. On 27 May his badly mutilated corpse was released to his horrified family, who were warned to keep silent.

According to a YouTube video and human rights activists, Hamza was tortured and his swollen body showed bullet wounds on his arms, black eyes, cuts, marks consistent with electric shock devices, bruises and whip marks. His neck had been broken and his penis cut off.

Like Neda Agha-Soltan, the young woman who was shot dead in street protests after Iran's disputed presidential elections two years ago, Hamza has come to symbolise the innocent victims in a struggle for freedom against tyranny and repression.

In the YouTube video, a picture of Hamza is held above his coffin. It shows his angelic grin and thick head of black hair. He is dressed in a polo shirt. Below the gold-framed photo lies his body. "He was taken alive and he was killed because he called for freedom," says the voice-over.

Other grainy clips show crowds holding a banner saying: "The martyr Hamza al-Khatib, killed under torture by Assad's gangs."

Cries of "Allahu Akbar" (God is greatest) were heard at his funeral and pro-democracy protesters have designated this Friday as "Children's Friday" in his memory."

Hamza's violent death is being discussed all over Syria as citizens struggle to come to terms with the brutality that has accompanied the two-month uprising against the regime of President Bashar al-Assad.

The official media are focusing on troops and police who have been killed by "armed terrorist gangs".

Videos of protests on Saturday show crowds chanting for Hamza in towns as far away as Latakia, home to the Assad clan. "The case has upset all of us," said a former security officer and father of four from Homs. "The brutality, especially to children, is only causing more people to come out – as it did in Deraa at the start of the protests."

Several Facebook pages have been started, including one with more than 61,000 followers called "We are all Hamza al-Khatib".

"Hamza has become a poster boy for the Syrian revolution," said Malik al-Abdeh, whose London-based Barada TV broke the story by broadcasting the YouTube clip last Thursday, before it went global on al-Jazeera Arabic on Friday.

"It's the same thing that happened with Mohammed Bouazizi [the vendor who burned himself to death in protest] in Tunisia and Khaled Said [who was killed by police] in Egypt. But this was not another young man. He was just a boy."

Syria's official media have accused al-Jazeera and other satellite channels of peddling propaganda.

State television aired an hour-long programme on Tuesday night on the death of Hamza. Accompanied by a doctor, Akram Shaar, and a psychological doctor, Majdee al-Fares, the presenter promised to expose the "whole truth" of the affair.

The doctors said the marks on Hamza's body were not signs of torture, as activists have alleged, but were faked by conspirators.

The doctors said Hamza died from bullet wounds but that conspirators created the marks on his body, trying to give the people a Syrian equivalent to Bouazizi in order to agitate them.

The programme also showed a pre-recorded conversation with Hamza's father and an uncle who said they trusted a pledge made by Assad to look into the circumstances of Hamza's death. The interior ministry said it would set up a committee to look into the tragedy.

None of Hamza's relatives could be reached for comment. Hamza's father, Ali, 65, was detained on Saturday, according to activists in Damascus. Wissam Tarif, the director of the human rights group Insan, said Hamza's uncle was picked up on Monday and his brother had also been detained.

The Syrian government has not allowed foreign journalists into the country since the uprising began in March. Demands for UN access have been rebuffed.

Syrian activists and rights organisations say more than 1,100 people have been killed and thousands rounded up and tortured in the past 10 weeks, but Hamza's is the most brutal case yet. The fact that the body was returned to the family rather than disposed of was intended to warn off other people, they said.

"This is a message from the state to all protesters," said a human rights expert who runs the Monitoring Protests Facebook page which focuses on abuses during the protests. "They are trying to say, 'We don't spare anyone and if you continue protesting this what we are going to do to you and your kids.' "

The Local Co-ordinating Committees of Syria, the best-organised grassrootsopposition network, said at least 25 children under 18 had been killed since mid-March.

The death toll includes a seven-year-old girl, Majd Ibrahim Airfaee, from Deraa, who was shot in the abdomen on 26 April, and Tamam Hamza Al-Saidawi, aged five, from Homs, who was shot dead in the car he was travelling in with his family in a case that has incensed the city.

Rime Allaf, an associate fellow at the London thinktank Chatham House, said the Syrian government's decision to broadcast a response demonstrated it was aware of how deeply Hamza's case has angered Syrians.

"Even people who have previously not taken sides, or who have been leaning towards the regime, have found this intolerable," she said.
BrKhalid
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 27
BrKhalid barely matters :(BrKhalid barely matters :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 1352



« Reply #5 on: Jun 13, 2011 12:00 AM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

Some more worrying news coming out of Syria at the moment in terms of an increased government crackdown.

Unfortunately, if it doesn't make the headlines we tend to forget there is real repression taking place.

May Allah make it easy for the people there.

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
lala marcy
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 14
lala marcy has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 254


« Reply #6 on: Jun 13, 2011 03:59 AM »

I expected better from this regime...goes to show- apples don't fall far from the tree..you know!?

Makes one wonder what people are to do ? Non violent resistance can only go so far...or can it go further...

Why isn't this making the headlines...
Fozia
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 124
Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!Fozia is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 2659



« Reply #7 on: Jun 13, 2011 09:51 AM »

salam


Why isn't this making headlines? Oil Oil Oil.....

Besides our lives are collatoral damage!!!!!!!!!!!!!



I think the tide will turn inshallah, the duas of the opressed are answered very swiftly.



Wassalaam

And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #8 on: Jun 13, 2011 04:14 PM »

wsalam,

I think many people thought the son Bashar would be much better than his father because he's western educated, introduced some reforms and seemed more progressive. But there's also his brother that controls the military who is said to be extremely brutal along with the whole feared security apparatus. I don't think there is such a thing as a "benevolent dictator"? They all use brutal means to keep their power including torture, killing, and suppression of freedoms. It is so sad. Syrian people are some of the nicest in the world. They are incredibly kind, generous to guests and really have faith in Islam in their hearts and deeds from a long tradition of scholarship. May Allah help the Syrian people against injustice and answer their duas. Ameen.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jun/13/syrian-lesbian-blogger-tom-macmaster
btw the whole 'gay girl in damascus' fake has just seriously hurt their cause. now the gov't can say western people are making things up and causing all this. and everyone else will have doubts about every news that comes from there. such a mess one person created with lies1!!!
BrKhalid
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 27
BrKhalid barely matters :(BrKhalid barely matters :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 1352



« Reply #9 on: Jun 14, 2011 12:31 AM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

The sad thing with all these regimes and dictators is how they usurp the wealth of their people.

The last time I was in Damascus, I was taken out to dinner to a really fancy restaurant where all the government officials would sit around and hang out. Obviously this was a far cry from what the majority of the population were accustomed to.

The difference between rich and poor in some of these countries is quite staggering!!


Where are the modern day Umars, I wonder, who actually care about the spiritual and material condition of their peoples?


As if to emphasise the point, below is a link to a story about the ex Tunisian leader, Ben Ali, who allegedly had $27mn in *cash* at his Presidential Palaces!!


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-13752786






Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
Shahida
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 47
Shahida might someday be someone..:)Shahida might someday be someone..:)Shahida might someday be someone..:)Shahida might someday be someone..:)
Gender: Female
Posts: 600


Hasbi Allah wa ni3mal wakeel!


« Reply #10 on: Jun 14, 2011 02:02 PM »

Salam alaikum

Totally agreed-what is happening is just aweful!

And ameen to the duas of all for liberation from tyranny and a better future for the people.

The last time I was in Damascus...

...was mid-2008.  And how much things have changed since then!!  Sad :'(  Always planned to go back, but it just got more and more difficult.  subhanAllah. 

May Allah swt make it easier for all of us, and relieve us from misery and oppression, and grant us better in this world and the Hereafter.

Salam
S.
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #11 on: Jun 17, 2011 04:51 PM »

On top of being so beautiful she's also awesome!!

===========================


Angelina Jolie visits Syrian refugees in Turkey


ALTINOZU, Turkey (AP) — U.N. envoy Angelina Jolie traveled to Turkey's border with Syria on Friday to meet some of the thousands of Syrian refugees who have fled their government's bloody crackdown on dissent.

The Hollywood celebrity and goodwill ambassador for the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees arrived in the Turkish province of Hatay on a private jet with boxes of toys for the refugee camps.

There are nearly 10,000 Syrian refugees in camps inside Turkey.

DHA television showed Jolie disembarking from the plane in sunglasses. The actress rested at Hatay airport and then headed to a camp in the Turkish town of Altinozu, Turkish media reported.

Turkish authorities hoisted a 45-foot-long (15-meter) banner near the entrance of a refugee camp to welcome Jolie. It read: "Goodness Angel of the World, Welcome" in English and Turkish.

Police kept fans away from the actress at Hatay's airport and cameras were removed from rooftops and high points to prevent video of the visit.

One fan held a poster that read: "Angelina, kiss me for world peace."

Authorities said Jolie's own crew would provide images of her meetings with refugees.

In April, Jolie traveled to Tunisia during its refugee crisis as thousands fled from its war-torn neighbor, Libya.
moderatesufi
Guest
« Reply #12 on: Jun 21, 2011 12:18 PM »

She should become Muslim.
um aboodi
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 26
um aboodi barely matters :(um aboodi barely matters :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 606



« Reply #13 on: Jun 21, 2011 02:40 PM »

salam

the curious thing about Syria, is that there are still many common people who support the current regime, believe that the Assad family is going to reform things and that protests are instigated by anarchists and outside forces. 

There is no critical mass yet to force a change.  The regime is brutal and many may be holding back out of fear for retribution. 

For sure, there are outside forces that seem to support the regime and current unrest at the same time.  But I refuse to believe that people who are protesting on the streets are anarchists;most are simple people who want reform and real change.  The Assad family has ruled Syria long enough. 

wassalam
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #14 on: Jun 21, 2011 05:10 PM »

wsalam,

that's interesting you see it like that umm aboodi. from what i saw there are two camps: those who are (as much as they can be) openly critical of the gov't and those who are critical and opposed but live in fear and are too scared to say/do anything.  but supporters??! unless their last name is assad or they are being paid by the gov't (or just afraid of bloodshed) i can't believe there is any. opposition to the regime goes a looong way back decades. but ppl have adapted to living under oppression so that may give the impression there isn't any. Allahu alam. Tumultuous times as this Arab Spring continues...

==================


Analysis: Syria's Assad loses his grip to hardliners


Protesters hold defaced posters of Syria's President Bashar Al-Assad during a demonstration to express solidarity with Syria's anti-government protesters in front of the Syrian embassy in Ankara June 10, 2011. REUTERS/Umit Bektas

By Samia Nakhoul

LONDON | Thu Jun 16, 2011 8:55am EDT

(Reuters) - President Bashar al-Assad is losing control to his hardline relatives, his forces are overstretched, his government is running out of money and the revolt against his rule is gathering support and funding.

Given all this, analysts and Syrian-based diplomats say the international community is starting to plan for a Syria without the Assads.

The risks of a slide into sectarian war are significant, most Syria-watchers nonetheless say, believing Assad will fight to the end, and start to regionalize the conflict by inciting violence in Lebanon, Turkey and across the borders with Israel.

"Despite everything they have done over the past few weeks -- killing, torture, mass arrests and raids -- the protests are continuing," said one Western diplomat. "This regime will fight to the death, but the only strategy they have is to kill people, and this is accelerating the crisis."

In its attempt to stamp out protests across the country of 23 million, the government has withdrawn most security forces from the suburbs of the capital, Damascus, diplomats say.

Yet each time the authorities go in hard to deal with one center of rebellion, other towns rise up.

Reliant on two elite units commanded by his brother Maher -- the 4th Armored Division and the Republican Guard -- as well as secret police and militia from his minority Alawite sect, President Assad is plainly overstretched.

"Our assessment is that the regime will fall," predicted the Damascus-based diplomat. "They have three to six months of actual military capabilities to sustain this, but they cannot keep a prolonged operation going indefinitely."

Najib al-Ghadban, a Syrian academic and activist, said in London there was a broad consensus on overthrowing the Assad family after 40 years in power.

"We believe strongly that the regime has lost its legitimacy. It has no vision on how to get the country out of the crisis. The situation is deteriorating," Ghadban said. "We are certain this will reach a positive end like Tunisia and Egypt," he added.

So far more than 1,100 people have been killed, up to 10,000 detained and thousands have fled since the crackdown began, according to the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights.

The international community, diplomats said, see a post-Assad era ideally facilitated by a military coup and several governments are encouraging Syrian generals to mutiny.

"We are isolating him and his family. We're addressing military leaders and cabinet members to rise up. We're encouraging the generals to rise up," the diplomat said.

"The key variable is the continuation of the momentum (of the revolt). We really believe there is no point of return."

FATALLY WEAKEN

He and other analysts also believe that Syria's economic paralysis, amid insistent reports the government is running out of money and having to call on its inner circle for emergency funding, will fatally weaken the Assads.

One diplomat said Assad's cousin, the business tycoon Rami Makhlouf who is a hate figure for protesters, has recently deposited $1 billion at the central bank to stabilize the Syrian pound.

"When they are no longer capable of paying the salaries of bureaucrats, the army, the police and their Alawite militia this crisis will balloon and bring about the collapse of the regime," the diplomat said. "This is a train wreck waiting to happen."

Signs of stretched resources and fraying loyalties are already apparent.

As protests started to spread, the authorities pulled out contingents of security and elite forces from the capital, which are now firefighting from Deraa in the south to Jisr al-Sughour in the north, the scene of heavy reprisals after the government this month claimed to have lost 120 dead to "armed gangs."

But even so residents say there are demonstrations every weekend in Damascus and surrounding suburbs.

The bloodshed in Jisr al Shugour was the result of splits in army ranks, diplomats say, an ominous sign for the Assads.

"Around 50 soldiers and mid ranking officers defected and were supported by locals and the authorities sent a force to counter them and 120 were killed," said another Syria-based diplomat, dismissing government accounts this was the work of Salafi fundamentalists as propaganda.

He and others point to the growing sophistication of the rebellion, which draws support from across society.

"After three months this is not a poor man's uprising. There is significant financing from the Syrian business community and upper class. They give money for satellite phones, cameras, food, water and medical supplies," the resident diplomat said.

"This is a broad-based movement that includes not only Syrian youth, but imams from mosques, businessmen, even former Baath party members."

Analysts are puzzled by Assad's failure to address the nation in a speech since the revolt started in mid-March. They point out that conciliatory statements by Assad promising that protesters will not be fired on and the killings that followed show that he is not in control.

"The big unanswered question concerns the president," said Patrick Seale, biographer of Bashar's father, Hafez al-Assad.

"The question is: Is he (Bashar) complicit with the killing or has he been pushed aside? The people running the show are the hardliners, the thugs."

Seale added: "Assad is not in charge. He is showing no leadership. He is depasse. They have really taken over."

STATE OF FEAR

Residents of Syria describe a state of fear and panic among the Alawite community, saying there had been revenge attacks against Alawite army officers and security men. They said Alawite officers in Sunni areas have pulled their children out of school and sent their families to Alawite villages or abroad.

Syrian activist Ausama Monajed said the international community, which has put 13 Syrian officials on its sanctions list, should add army officers involved in killing protesters as well as Syrian firms linked to the Assad family.

Syrian oil sales, worth $7-8 million a day and which Monajed says go directly to fund the military, should be boycotted. Arab states must build a consensus against Assad by lobbying China and Russia for a Security Council resolution, he said.

All scenarios that anticipate the downfall of Assad, however, depend on the Sunni-dominated army splitting, while Western military intervention such as in Libya is unlikely in Syria because of the regional risks.

Analysts say the risks are high that Syria, an ally of Iran and Lebanon's Shi'ite Hezbollah guerrillas and with a sectarian and ethnic mix of Sunni, Kurdish, Alawite and Christians, could slip into war.

Syria, they add, can make trouble in the region by trying to incite another war between Hezbollah and Israel. Recent demonstrations on the Israeli-Syrian frontier, which had been quiet for 38 years, were encouraged by Syrian authorities in an attempt to broaden the conflict.

"The Syrians have their fingers in many pies. They have many levers to put pressure on their neighbors and create problems between Hezbollah and Israel, between Sunni and Shi'ites in Lebanon and the PKK (Kurdistan Workers Party) and AKP (Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan's party) in Turkey," the diplomat said.
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #15 on: Jun 22, 2011 11:45 PM »

Amazing men subhanAllah.

==================

Syrian men promise to marry women who were raped

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle-east/syrian-men-promise-to-marry-women-who-were-raped/2011/06/20/AG6sO1cH_story.html

KHIRBET AL-JOUS, Syria — A group of men have committed themselves to an unlikely way of challenging the violence that has swept Syria in recent months, pledging to marry women they have never met.

In this village near the Turkish border, Syrians fleeing their country’s security forces have established a makeshift tent city. Hundreds of families, bearing only what they could fit in their cars, eagerly hope for the fall of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. Meanwhile, horror stories swirl about what has befallen the towns and villages they call home.

One involves four sisters, from the nearby town of Sumeriya, who were allegedly raped by pro-government Shabiha militiamen.

“It made us so mad. Such an injustice. We have decided, we will marry them,” said Ibrahim Kayyis, a 32-year-old baker from Jisr al-Shugour, a town that was stormed by troops.

To reclaim their “honor,” families in Syria have been known to kill raped female members. Even if families allow such women to live, they are not eligible to marry.

“We sat and discussed that we want to change this. We don’t want to change just the regime in Syria, but also this kind of stuff. So we will marry them in front of everyone,” Kayyis said.

The four sisters are in a hospital in Turkey, according to Kayyis. It is not possible to verify their story, or their exact whereabouts, because the men will not identify them out of consideration for the shame it would bring upon the women’s family. Likewise, Turkish authorities have not released the names of any of the thousands of refugees who have fled Syria.

Mohammed Mourey, a pharmacist from Jisr al-Shugour who has set up shop in a concrete shack in Khirbet al-Jous, initially proposed marrying the women. “They are victims of the revolution, and we will protect them,” he said.

Mourey said that when he first thought of the idea, 15 men came forward to volunteer. The group was then narrowed to four.

The men said that rapes and other assaults on women signify an escalation of violence by the government and its allies, which have sought to discredit the opposition movement.

“At first, they said it was sectarianism. Then they said it was criminal gangs. When that did not work, as a third step, they are attacking our honor,” Kayyis said.

When the campaign against the protesters in Jisr al-Shugour began, the military allegedly used a tactic that many Syrians see as a direct assault on their honor: breaking down doors of houses in which women were sleeping.

“Dignity and reputation are the most important things for Syrians. And women are a big part of this, and the regime knows it. So, for this reason, they do this to us as the opposition,” said Musab Jani, a 25-year-old mechanical engineer who said he volunteered to join Mourey’s initiative.

Kayyis and Mourey said they look forward to their marriages and to Assad’s fall from power. Kayyis said he hopes to return to being a baker, preferably dividing his time between Lebanon and Syria. He and his future wife will live in his house in Jisr al-Shugour, he said, with “no more than two kids.” Mourey said he is not sure he can continue living in Syria. If his future wife is willing, he said, he would like to apply for residency in Canada.

“When the revolution succeeds in Syria, my part will be done,” he said. “I have lost many friends and cousins. It will be hard to stay in Syria.”
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #16 on: Aug 05, 2011 05:41 PM »

Old pictures of Damascus. Beautiful Shaam.

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/08/04/once_upon_a_time_in_damascus?page=0,0
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #17 on: Aug 19, 2011 04:35 PM »

wsalam,

obama made the comment yesterday that Assad was "slaughtering his own people" in the streets Sad

-----------

Syrian forces kill 20 despite Assad pledge

AMMAN (Reuters) - Syrian forces shot dead 20 protesters on Friday despite a pledge by President Bashar al-Assad that a crackdown was over, activists said as thousands marched across Syria, spurred on by U.S. and European calls for him to step down.

Most of the violence was in the southern province of Deraa where the uprising against Assad erupted in March, triggering a harsh response in which U.N. investigators say Syrian forces may have committed crimes against humanity.

"Bye-bye Bashar; See you in The Hague," chanted protesters in the central city of Homs, waving their shoes in a gesture of contempt. "We want revenge against Maher and Bashar," shouted others, referring to the Syria leader and his powerful brother.

"The people want the execution of the president," shouted a crowd in northern Idlib province, reflecting deepening antipathy to the 45-year-old Assad. Some carried banners with slogans proclaiming "Signs of Victory."

Local activist Abdallah Aba Zaid said 18 people were killed in Deraa province, including eight in the town of Ghabaghab, five in Hirak, four in Inkhil and one in Nawa. Dozens of people were wounded, he said.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said two people were also killed in the Bab Amro district of Homs.

Assad, from the minority Alawite sect in the mostly Sunni Muslim nation, told U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon this week that military and police operations had stopped. But activists say his forces are still shooting at protesters.

"Maybe Bashar al-Assad does not regard police as security forces," said a witness in Hama, where security forces fired machineguns late on Thursday to prevent a night-time protest.

Syrian state television said the deaths in Ghabaghab were caused by gunmen who attacked a police post, killing a policeman and a civilian and wounding two others. It said two members of the security forces and one gunman were killed in a clash in Harasta, near Damascus.

Syria has expelled most independent media since the unrest began, making it difficult to verify reports of violence in which the United Nations says 2,000 civilians have been killed. Authorities blame terrorists and extremists for the bloodshed and say 500 soldiers and police have been killed.

SNIPERS ON ROOF

Internet footage of Friday's protests suggested that although widespread they were smaller than at their peak in July, before Assad sent tanks and troops into several cities.

A doctor in Zabadani, 30 km (20 miles) northeast of Damascus, said army vehicles were in the town and snipers were on rooftops to prevent crowds marching.

Protesters from the Sunni majority resent the power and wealth amassed by some Alawites, who adhere to an offshoot of Shi'ite Islam. They want Assad to quit, the dismantling of the security apparatus and the introduction of sweeping reforms.

The violent repression prompted coordinated calls from the United States and European Union on Thursday for Assad to step down and Washington imposed sweeping new sanctions on Syria, which borders Israel, Lebanon and Iraq and is an ally of Iran.

On Friday, European Union states agreed to expand the number of Syrian officials and institutions targeted by EU sanctions and laid out plans for a possible oil embargo. Syria exports over a third of its 385,000 barrels per day output to Europe.

The shape of a post-Assad Syria is unclear, although the disparate opposition, persecuted for decades, has gained a fresh sense of purpose as popular disaffection has spread.

President Barack Obama froze Syrian state assets in the United States, banned U.S. citizens from operating or investing in Syria and prohibited U.S. imports of Syrian oil products.

"The future of Syria must be determined by its people, but President Bashar al-Assad is standing in their way," Obama said. "His calls for dialogue and reform have rung hollow while he is imprisoning, torturing and slaughtering his own people."

Adding to international pressure, U.N. investigators said Assad's forces had committed violations that may amount to crimes against humanity. The United Nations plans to send a team to Syria on Saturday to assess the humanitarian situation.

The United States, Britain and European allies say they will draft a U.N. Security Council sanctions resolution on Syria.

But Russia, which has resisted Western calls for U.N. sanctions, said on Friday it also opposed calls for Assad to step down and believed he needs time to implement reforms.

"We do not support such calls and believe that it is necessary now to give President Assad's regime time to realize all the reform processes that have been announced," Interfax news agency quoted a foreign ministry source as saying.

SANCTIONS IMPACT

Despite the dramatic sharpening of Western rhetoric, there is no threat of Western military action like that against Libya's Muammar Gaddafi, meaning Assad's conflict with his opponents seems likely to grind on in the streets.

It may also take time for the diplomatic broadside, backed by the new sanctions, to have an impact on the president who took power when his father, Hafez al-Assad, died 11 years ago after three decades in office.

Assad has so far brushed off international pressure and survived years of U.S. and European isolation following the 2005 assassination of Lebanese statesman Rafik al-Hariri, a killing many Western nations held Damascus responsible for.

But Syria's economy, already hit by a collapse in tourism revenue, could be further damaged by Obama's announcement. U.S. sanctions will make it very difficult for banks to finance transactions involving Syrian oil exports.

It will make it also challenging for companies with a large U.S. presence, such as Shell, to continue producing crude in Syria -- although the impact on global oil markets from a potential shutdown of Syria's oil industry would be small compared to that of Libya.

Assad says the protests are a foreign conspiracy to divide Syria and said last week his army would "not relent in pursuing terrorist groups."

U.N. investigators said on Thursday Syrian forces had fired on peaceful protesters, often at short range. Their wounds were "consistent with an apparent shoot-to-kill policy."

sadah
Brother
Bro
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 38
sadah is working their way up :)sadah is working their way up :)sadah is working their way up :)
Gender: Male
Posts: 479


Dont be sad...


« Reply #18 on: Aug 19, 2011 05:31 PM »

May Allah bring end to this fitnah.

"Whoever rejects false deities and believes in Allah has grasped a firm handhold which will never break." Q 2:256"
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #19 on: Dec 07, 2011 06:50 PM »

Salam,

Sad Article: http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/nyrblog/2011/dec/07/twilight-damascus/


Anyone watch the interview with Barbra Walters?? http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/newsmakers/abc-exclusive-defiant-assad-denies-ordering-bloody-crackdown-111944523.html

I think I'd throw up if I watched it. May Allah give the people of Shaam justice.

lala marcy
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 14
lala marcy has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 254


« Reply #20 on: Dec 14, 2011 05:31 PM »

I didnt know Barbara Walters was going to interview Assad...wouldnt have watched though. Agreed, it would sicken me more.

When and how will this end ? Seriously- governments and the Arab League seem to be going on empty threats and promises right now.....
akhan
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 107
akhan has an aura about them. :)akhan has an aura about them. :)akhan has an aura about them. :)akhan has an aura about them. :)akhan has an aura about them. :)akhan has an aura about them. :)akhan has an aura about them. :)akhan has an aura about them. :)akhan has an aura about them. :)akhan has an aura about them. :)
Gender: Male
Posts: 1706



« Reply #21 on: Dec 14, 2011 06:45 PM »

Personally, I don't think anyone would want Assad to go, whether it be the Arab League or the US. Because if that happened, there is the possibility that an Islamic government will be elected or maybe Hezbollah will become more powerful. Whether it be either of those, they'll probably start fighting for the Golan Heights. That's a risk I don't think anyone would want to take.
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #22 on: Dec 30, 2011 03:51 AM »

subhanAllah... nasrAllah qareeb inshaallah

Tens of thousands give inspiring pledge to Allah in Homs, Syria [Dec 2011] - MUST SEE!
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #23 on: Feb 09, 2012 05:36 PM »

Salam,

The news coming out of Syria these days is so horrible Sad Some people even use the word genocide. How many ppl have to be killed?? I wish we could have bloodless revolutions, but it seems it's not possible in the Middle East. I read the president of the Maldives stepped down after protests. It's sad Bashar et al will never take that step. He doesn't even offer any concessions or negotiations that's how steeped in their own arrogance they are.

It's interesting to see how Allah abased these dictators who had absolutely no regard for human life. Mubarak humiliated, Qadaf's body on display in a mall... I guess we will see what happens. In the meantime the beautiful Syrian people will suffer.


Pictures from the 'Big Picture' blog  http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2012/02/syria_fighting_continues.html
lala marcy
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 14
lala marcy has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 254


« Reply #24 on: Feb 09, 2012 06:52 PM »

Salaam,

The worse thing is the helplessness one feels when in fact we are all witness to things like this - albeit from afar.

Very tragic indeed.

Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: