// Whats going on in Pakistan??
    Peace be upon you,
    Welcome to Madinat Al-Muslimeen, the City of the Muslims. Please feel free to visit the different hot spots around the Madina and post any discussion, articles, suggestions, comments, art, poetry, events, recipes, etc etc. Basically anything you would like to share with your sisters and brothers!! Non-muslims are also of course quite welcome to share their comments. If this is your first time here, you need to register with the city council. Once you register you have 15 days to post your mandatory introduction and then you will be upgraded to a Madina Citizen, God Willing. Please note that our city does have regulations which are listed in the city constitution. Read them carefully before moving in. P.S. - You can also post anonymously if you wish. P.S.S. - Also be sure to check out our ARCHIVES from 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 & 2007. :)

Random Quote: Riches without faith are the greatest poverty. - Ali ibn Abi Talib (May Allah be pleased with him)
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Whats going on in Pakistan??  (Read 2266 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« on: May 03, 2011 06:18 PM »


This was a good article...

=========

   
The Lies They Tell Us
Can the Pakistani government's web of deceit survive the death of Osama bin Laden?

BY MOSHARRAF ZAIDI | MAY 2, 2011

ABBOTTABAD, Pakistan — Three hours after U.S. President Barack Obama announced Osama bin Laden's death from the East Room of the White House, I found myself sitting in the Jadoon Shopping Plaza in Abbottabad, Pakistan -- the resort town where the killing had happened eight hours earlier -- talking with a man named Sohaib Athar. The owner of the Twitter account named @ReallyVirtual, Athar had just achieved a strange sort of celebrity as the man who had inadvertently live-tweeted the climax of the most expensive, most hyped, and, at times, most surreal manhunt in history. Several hours before the world would learn who had died in the Abbotabad night, he tweeted: "Since taliban (probably) don't have helicpoters, and since they're saying it was not "ours", so must be a complicated situation." Complicated indeed. When we met later, Athar said he "never imagined it would be bin Laden, at the bottom of it all."

One of the founders of a Lahore-based U.S. technology startup, Athar moved his family to Abbottabad two years ago. He was getting tired of the guilt associated with deflecting his six-year-old son's constant questions about suicide bombings and terrorist violence, things that have become regular features of life for residents of Lahore. He chose Abbottabad because of its reputation for serenity and safety, and upon arrival decided to make his own contribution to the community: a sleek and modern café that serves quite exceptional coffee and plays great music, opened by Athar and his wife after they discovered that their new environs were lacking a decent gathering place for young people. Everything was going fine until Sunday night, when a U.S. military helicopter fell out of the sky over the city. At the time, Athar tweeted "The abbottabad helicopter/UFO was shot down near the Bilal Town area, and there's report of a flash. People saying it could be a drone." Later, he wrote "Funny, moving to Abbottabad was part of the 'being safe' strategy."


If Athar's story is deeply ironic, it also speaks volumes about the lives of ordinary and decent Pakistanis today. If the Pakistani state's duplicity and dysfunction represent darkness and fear, Athar's story -- in which a highly skilled, educated young man moves from a broken Pakistani city to a beautiful one and attempts to improve it further -- represents hope and light. His bewilderment at how violence has chased him is the bewilderment of a whole country.

The news of bin Laden's death may have been greeted with a spontaneous outpouring of joy and patriotism on the streets of American cities, and with relative disinterest in the Middle East, which is still preoccupied with the sights and sounds of the Arab Spring and probably was never really all that enamored with bin Laden to begin with. But in Pakistan, where bin Laden allegedly made his home for years -- some reports suggest as many as five -- the killing of the founder and leader of al Qaeda is not the end of a story. It is, sadly and inevitably, the beginning of a new chapter in an epic saga of death, destruction, deception and degeneration in Pakistan. If Americans are confused about exactly what Pakistan is up to, they need to get in line. Pakistanis are more confused -- utterly so.

This confusion has been carefully cultivated by a national elite whose singular focus is the accumulation of wealth, at all costs. In the near-decade since 9/11, Pakistan's generals, judges, politicians, and bureaucrats have constructed two separate and equally effective narratives. To the West, they sold the bin Laden version of Pakistan: a fanatical nation, full of restless natives armed to the teeth with hatred and -- if the West wasn't careful -- nukes. To ordinary Pakistanis, they sold the Ugly American version of the rest of the world: a big bad Uncle Sam and friends who were always burning Korans, knighting Salman Rushdies, and violating the Land of the Pure (the literal meaning of "Pakistan").


This duplicity helped keep the West sufficiently interested in the myth of "engaging the elite" -- because of course engaging the people would mean courting savagery. It also helped keep the Pakistani people sufficiently hostile toward any notion of understanding or appreciating the West's genuine and legitimate concerns and interests in Pakistan. But with time, this delicate waltz has grown harder and harder to sustain. The Pakistani military, for all its swagger, has either forgotten all the steps, or never knew them to begin with.

The notion that one fine day bin Laden adorned a burqa and made a trip over perhaps the most treacherous 180 miles of terrain in the world, from Tora Bora to Abbottabad, without catching the attention of Pakistan's vast, richly endowed, and unaccountable military establishment is as ridiculous as any conspiracy theories now being peddled by Pakistan's incorrigible right-wing hacks -- with the most common version simply refusing to believe that he is dead.

It is even less likely that, as U.S. counterterrorism czar John Brennan claimed in a press conference today, Pakistani authorities did not know about the military operation that killed bin Laden until it was over. Abbottabad's Bilal Town neighborhood where bin Laden lived and died was virtually around the corner from the Pakistan Military Academy at Kakul -- Pakistan's West Point, where future General Kayanis and General Pashas are learning to be officers. It doesn't take 40 minutes to start to scramble planes, or get troops to Abbottabad, and there is no getting into the town by land or air without the expressed consent of Pakistan's security establishment. This may not have been an official joint operation, but it was almost certainly a collective effort.

Maintaining these two fictions requires a great deal of creativity from both parties involved. In the first instance, Pakistan has to lie to enable the U.S. government to avoid looking like a first-timer in Las Vegas, getting hustled by a pro. In the second, the United States has to lie, to avoid implicating its chief partner in the dishonoring of Pakistani pride and the violation of Pakistani sovereignty.

On Indian television, the veteran U.S. diplomat Frank Wisner poignantly noted that the United States has to delicately negotiate "ambiguity" in its relationship with Pakistan. The problem for Pakistan is that it must also negotiate this ambiguity with itself. For a country that can't pay its bills, or even manage its borders, this is a deeply ambitious order. Americans should not hold their breath for any dramatic changes in the short term in Pakistan.

 
Hard2Hit
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 15
Hard2Hit has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 632


Taubah


WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2011 12:52 PM »

Salaams,

How is the article above not just another conspiracy theory? (wheres the proof ?)

Some facts: (On the topic of whats going on in Pakistan)

1. Pakistan has suffered more in the war on terror, than the US.

2. Around 30,000 Pakistani civilians and 5,000 security and military personnel lost their lives in Osama Bin Laden’s villainous war on Pakistan and its people.

http://www.facebook.com/notes/council-on-pakistan-relations/official-statement-council-on-pakistan-relations-applauds-bin-ladens-capture-urg/10150245529100429

Mahera Rahman
Executive Director, Council on Pakistan Relations
http://pakistanrelations.org/

3. There were hardly any suicide attacks in Pakistan before 2001. And after that our arms were twisted and US threatened Pak with serious consequences, if we dont fight her so called war on terror.

4. Pakistan provided air bases, supply routes, and intelligence sharing. (Supply routes for Nato tankers are like the jugular vein of the war on terror in Afghanistan)

5. In 2004 Pakistanis efforts were termed as not enough by the Americans, and Pakistan started operation in the tribal areas of Pakistan. Pakistani tribesmen thought to be betrayed, and then a storm of terrorism in Pakistan began. Lahore, Karachi, Islamabad, Peshawar and Quetta became the frequent targets of terrorism.

6. Pakistan has spent 30 billion dollars in the fight against terrorism. And received minimal financial support from the US.


7. A hell lot of this bloodshed could be avoided if this never happened "2001 - Bush rejects Taliban offer to surrender bin Laden"

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/bush-rejects-taliban-offer-to-surrender-bin-laden-631436.html

8. The drone attacks by US on Pakistani soil have killed thousands of innocent civilians, many related to the killed are against Pak army now. Enemies of Pakistan are using such people to conduct terrorism within Pakistan.

Capital Talk with Clive Smith (US Lawyer) and Imran Khan on Drone Attacks



YaNabi.com - Capital Talk 2011.04.19 - 1

The knight doesn't wait when he's ill or has cancer brother, the knight fights on... He finds a strategy, changes tactics, and hits hard.
skhansj
Bro
Full Member
*

Reputation Power: 1
skhansj has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 129



WWW
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2011 01:01 PM »

@HardToHit, there is no conflict between what you have said and the article.

I agree that terrorism has destroyed Pakistan, and has been inflamed by the idiosyncratic vote-creating 'war-on-terror' spectacle.

However, I am also in agreement with Musharraf that there are probably individuals in the Pakistani Government that are selling out their fellow-citizen's interest for the purposes of self-enrichment. The 'protection racket' is the older trick in the book, and it is a way for a few to benefit at the expense of the many.
Hard2Hit
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 15
Hard2Hit has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 632


Taubah


WWW
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2011 02:37 PM »

Salaams,

What i'm trying to establish here is that "Pakistan has been a good watchdog for US"...

On the other hand the text here is claiming that either Pakistan has been a clueless Mouse, or a bad dog that barked back at its master.

Quote
This duplicity helped keep the West sufficiently interested in the myth of "engaging the elite" -- because of course engaging the people would mean courting savagery. It also helped keep the Pakistani people sufficiently hostile toward any notion of understanding or appreciating the West's genuine and legitimate concerns and interests in Pakistan. But with time, this delicate waltz has grown harder and harder to sustain. The Pakistani military, for all its swagger, has either forgotten all the steps, or never knew them to begin with.

The notion that one fine day bin Laden adorned a burqa and made a trip over perhaps the most treacherous 180 miles of terrain in the world, from Tora Bora to Abbottabad, without catching the attention of Pakistan's vast, richly endowed, and unaccountable military establishment is as ridiculous as any conspiracy theories now being peddled by Pakistan's incorrigible right-wing hacks -- with the most common version simply refusing to believe that he is dead.

I see a huge conflict here... since Pakistan has been working its butt off to fight USA's war, and please its master.

Or did I miss something ?

The knight doesn't wait when he's ill or has cancer brother, the knight fights on... He finds a strategy, changes tactics, and hits hard.
Hard2Hit
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 15
Hard2Hit has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 632


Taubah


WWW
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2011 10:50 AM »

On Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda, US and Pakistan really are on the same team


http://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/Opinion/2011/0504/On-Osama-bin-Laden-and-Al-Qaeda-US-and-Pakistan-really-are-on-the-same-team

US and Pakistani interests do diverge in some areas, but combating Al Qeada isn't one of them. In fact, the speculation around Pakistan's complicity following the killing of Osama bin Laden is misplaced and harmful to our future cooperation with Pakistan, making us less safe.



Quote
Deputy National Security Advisor John Brennan noted, “Pakistan has been responsible for capturing and killing more terrorists inside of Pakistan than any country, and it’s by a wide margin.”

The knight doesn't wait when he's ill or has cancer brother, the knight fights on... He finds a strategy, changes tactics, and hits hard.
lucid
Bro
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 15
lucid has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 387



« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2011 11:37 AM »

Salaams,

What i'm trying to establish here is that "Pakistan has been a good watchdog for US"...

I see a huge conflict here... since Pakistan has been working its butt off to fight USA's war, and please its master.

Or did I miss something ?

you know you are being careless when you say "Pakistan has been..."  

right?

pakistan is not run by normal people like me or you.  its run by a group of people who feel very entitled to do as they please.  most of these people are more focused on kickbacks and their bank balance than fulfilling the trust of the people.  and the military of pakistan has got to be the most corrupt military of any "democratic" country.  they act like they own everything, and that if it wasn't for them, everybody'd be slave labor in some indian concentration camp.

the problem in pakistan, and all over the developing world, is that its institutions are fundamentally corrupt from the inside out.  bangladesh and india are much the same. but the military and intelligence services have a million times more authority in pakistan than bangladesh and india.

just my opinion...

assalamualaikum


  
blackrose
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 3
blackrose has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 1649



« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2011 11:11 PM »

Agree with hard2hit.

Why would Pakistan even care to protect Bin Laden. They don't like him!

First I believed like everyone else. But now I think Bin Laden died a long time ago. Maybe they found his body or dug it up, don't know.

But I watched the news and all the neighbors have never seen him and they all beleive that its a lie.
Plus no photos, quick sea burial.
Plus did they just burn the compound? why?
Their story also keeps changing and even the american news media is admitting their story keeps changing on how they killed him!
The Islamic thing about 24 hour seems like an excuse. IF they really cared about that, they wouldn't bury him in the sea. Plus if they care so much about the Muslim world then they would show proof because I think the Muslim world wants that more than burying him within 24 hours. Plus the American people deserve proof as well.
BrKhalid
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 27
BrKhalid barely matters :(BrKhalid barely matters :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 1352



« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2011 08:49 AM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro


A couple of quotes from the story below:


Quote
The raid has stirred up anger in Pakistan, where rallies are expected in several cities on Friday to both protest what is seen as a US infringement of Pakistani sovereignty and to criticise the government for allowing this to happen.

Pakistan's army has acknowledged "shortcomings" in its own efforts to find Osama Bin Laden but has also threatened to review ties with the US military if another such unilateral operation



Quote
A senior Pakistani military official said one of Bin Laden's wives told investigators she had been living in the compound for five years, along with her husband



Maybe you guys in Pakistan can give us an idea as to what local reaction is like at the moment?


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-13304809

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
JustOne
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 17
JustOne has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 543


« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2011 09:36 AM »

Ridiculous government.

In the US, an air traffic controller fell asleep on the job, and he was fired. Here they had 4-5 foreign helicopters in their airspace, and they didn't even know?? Riiiighhtttt... supposedly Pakistan has a very strong army, but NOT A SINGLE person has been fired yet???  either the Pakistanis were totally involved and bought off (very possible), or things didn't really go down the way they say it did (also very possible). It's probably a combination of both though.

fish fish fishy.
JustOne
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 17
JustOne has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 543


« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2011 09:37 AM »

Oh and going back to what Jannah keeps saying in the other thread... what we CAN do (besides conjuring up conspiracy theories), is demand the government to resign... just like the middle eastern countries have done. 

Enough is really enough.
WCoastbaba
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 51
WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)
Gender: Male
Posts: 1291



« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2011 04:01 PM »

Salaams - Well, for all the doubters, I think that should be gone now, in teh other thread, posted the news that alQ confirmed the death. Just wanted to share some stats I saw on the Guardian about what Pakistani's think about the situation:

- 48% of Pakistanis say he was not a true Muslim leader.
- 35% believe he was a mass murderer of Muslims, compared with 42% who disagree.
- 35% think he actually declared war on Pakistan, with 45% who disagree.
- Roughly half of all respondents feel negative about the idea of an association between Pakistan's national intelligence agency (the ISI) and al-Qaida.
- 75% disapprove of US actions in hunting Bin Laden on Pakistani soil.
- Less than a quarter think he authorised the 9/11 attacks.
- 74% believe the US government does not respect Islam and considers itself at war with the Muslim world.
- 70% object to the Pakistani government's policy of accepting economic aid from the US.
- 86% oppose the government's allowing, or having allowed, US drone attacks on militant groups.

Oh and going back to what Jannah keeps saying in the other thread... what we CAN do (besides conjuring up conspiracy theories), is demand the government to resign... just like the middle eastern countries have done. 

Enough is really enough.

Totally agree with you here Sis JustOne - I often tell the Pakistan restaurant/business owners that I interact with often that the next revolution should be in Pakistan and they agree, or at least share that sentiment, that something of that nature has to be done there. Though I'm Indian, I would still love to see Pakistan become the nation it has the potential to become (of course, safety as well is an issue, as I have family there as I mentioned in my rant below)

Here's my words on Pak from my rant on the OBL thread:

Quote
I think we have a much bigger problem to solve, both in Pakistan and these other countries - it's all about education and opening up our eyes - I don't know how it's going to be done, but if we are going to move forward, advance, and get back to where we should be as the honored Ummah that are (though our condition needs to be changed to fully realize that), we have a long ways to go - so why really bother about these issues that are probably out of our control. Yes, let's discuss it, that's what I'm going here after all, but it's been like this throughout history, so it's nothing new - governments and their parts do things that are unlawful, unethical, immoral, but things have always moved on. I read that many Pakistani's weren't even bothered - because they are just trying to get that clean glass of water or well cooked food - I'm even worried about my extended family there - can they really continue to live their, especially when it comes to the younger kids - is it salvageable there in the long run? My Baji there even says she doesn't care of Pakistan anymore, that it has changed to much since her younger days (she's in her 30's two young sons under age of 10). I guess this should be in the other thread, sorry, just got into it.

BABA
 desibro

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2011 04:24 PM »

Oh and going back to what Jannah keeps saying in the other thread... what we CAN do (besides conjuring up conspiracy theories), is demand the government to resign... just like the middle eastern countries have done. 

Enough is really enough.

I love this idea. Ppl need to set up Facebook pages like "enough is enough, we don't want any more corrupt govt's" or "gov't for the pakistani ppl" etc. And start organizing. Pakistan gets ALOT of aid from foreign powers they would not be able to do anything to peaceful protesters. We've seen that this has worked in other countries so go for it!!
Hard2Hit
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 15
Hard2Hit has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 632


Taubah


WWW
« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2011 10:17 PM »

Salaams,

There are a lot many FB pages already. And the youth is getting politically active under Imran Khan's leadership.

My vote is gonna go to IK's PTI inshaAllah. The big change will take quite some time though.

Wasalam.

The knight doesn't wait when he's ill or has cancer brother, the knight fights on... He finds a strategy, changes tactics, and hits hard.
WCoastbaba
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 51
WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)
Gender: Male
Posts: 1291



« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2011 10:54 PM »

Salaams - just heard on Al Jazeera, that there is one last video from OBL that was recorded just a week ago, and he supposedly mentions that the Pakistani people should rise up against their govt. I would hope its from their own will, their own desire and not because someone tells them and at this point, I would be leaning towards the former and certainly hope it is. After all, what Al Qaeda couldn't do in all these years, the people did in just a few weeks in both Tunisia and Egypt - with their own determination, desire and of course, with their lives and blood.

Yes, as Sis J mentioned below - it has worked in the Arab world - and I hope that is true, that the protestors wouldn't be harmed as they have been in the way we are witnessing in Syria, etc.

BABA
 desibro

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
Hard2Hit
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 15
Hard2Hit has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 632


Taubah


WWW
« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2011 09:35 PM »

Pakistan's Military Was On the Scene

By SHAUKAT QADIR
http://www.counterpunch.org/qadir05052011.html

Abbottabad is a small town merely 70 plus miles from Islamabad. It is essentially a military cantonment, hosting four Regimental Centers and a few army units, with the inevitable attendance of numerous security and intelligence agents. The military academy is only a few miles distant from the heart of the town. Although part of the K-P Province, it is essentially non-Pashtun.

It’s the kind of place where any non-military looking stranger would stand out and, a large number of strangers would immediately give rise to suspicion.

Osama, a man on the run, with a bounty of $25 million on his head who, according to all previous CIA reports was in hiding either in the safety of the (now) famous caves of Tora Bora, Afghanistan or flitting to and fro across the Durand Line, but always in the Pashtun Taliban infested region, always secreted, and always under heavy protection. That was his natural habitat: Pashtun/Taliban area. Why, in the name of anything Holy, should he risk his life by secreting himself in Abbottabad with minimal protection -- a non-Pashtun, non-Taliban region where there is no direct link to escape to either Pakistan’s tribal areas or to Afghanistan?

I am aware of what many Afghans are saying and many Americans implying/inferring: that this, in fact, establishes the nexus between Osama and the Pakistan military/ISI. The fact that the lady (purporting to be one of Osama’s wives) stated that she had been living in this house for about three months has been, deliberately or erroneously, interpreted to imply that Osama too had been there for that period! In fact, more adventurous journalists are now talking about the whole family living there for almost six years! How far will they go, to demonize Pakistan?

For the record, this property has been under ISI surveillance while it was under construction. It was first raided in 2003, and the ISI just missed capturing Al-Libby (he was later captured by the ISI close to Mardan in K-P Province). It has been raided on numerous occasions since.

More here: http://www.counterpunch.org/qadir05052011.html

The knight doesn't wait when he's ill or has cancer brother, the knight fights on... He finds a strategy, changes tactics, and hits hard.
Hard2Hit
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 15
Hard2Hit has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 632


Taubah


WWW
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2011 09:41 AM »

Salaams,

Interesting developments:

CHINA: "We will continue to support Pakistan in instituting their own anti-terrorism strategies and carrying them out based on their domestic situation, and we appreciate Pakistan's active participation in the international anti-terrorism cooperation," Jiang said."
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/178415.html


TEHRAN (FNA)- Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad warned his US counterpart against extending the war in Afghanistan to neighboring Pakistan, saying that Barack Obama could face a worse fate than that of Bush, if he commits the same mistake.
http://english.farsnews.net/newstext.php?nn=9002200470

The knight doesn't wait when he's ill or has cancer brother, the knight fights on... He finds a strategy, changes tactics, and hits hard.
JustOne
Sis
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 17
JustOne has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 543


« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2011 10:25 AM »

Did anyone see Piers Morgan's interview of Donald Rumsfeld? He had a lot to say about Pakistan - some of it wasn't all that bad.
lucid
Bro
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 15
lucid has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 387



« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2011 08:23 AM »

absolutely heartbreaking pictures of the misery that OBL sympathizers have wrought.

i hate these people with every ounce of loathing my body and mind can muster.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/gallery/2011/may/13/pakistan-osamabinladen?intcmp=239
WCoastbaba
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 51
WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)WCoastbaba is on the verge of being a madinan :)
Gender: Male
Posts: 1291



« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2011 09:43 AM »

absolutely heartbreaking pictures of the misery that OBL sympathizers have wrought.

i hate these people with every ounce of loathing my body and mind can muster.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/gallery/2011/may/13/pakistan-osamabinladen?intcmp=239


OK, THIS I can agree with you on Br. lucid. To the core.

BABA

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
Hard2Hit
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 15
Hard2Hit has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 632


Taubah


WWW
« Reply #19 on: May 14, 2011 11:16 AM »

Salams,

That was a terribly sad event! And thats one just instance out of many examples of how Pakistan has suffered many folds than the US, in this so called war on terror - that has increased terror in Pakistan exponentially.

This tehreek-e-taliban Pakistan is different from Afghan Taliban. I once collected alot of material to prove this point. TTP's leadership is sold out and funded by elements outside Pakistan, and their foot soldiers are brainwashed pakistani men who have been made to believe that the pakistani nation and army is an ally of kuffar, hence should be attacked.

At the other hand the soldiers of US's army of fortune, the Blackwater/XE, are also waging war on Pakistan from within. First the criminally dumb govt of pak allowed XE men in pakistan unaccounted, and now these terrorists have spread all across the country!

The knight doesn't wait when he's ill or has cancer brother, the knight fights on... He finds a strategy, changes tactics, and hits hard.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: