// Green Masjid in Germany
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« on: Jun 23, 2011 12:38 PM »


Asalaamu Alaikum bro

Where's Br UBAB?

I wonder what he thinks of this particular mosque design? bro




BERLIN // A Muslim community in northern Germany plans to build what is believed to be the world's first mosque equipped with wind turbines in its minarets to generate electricity.

The design, the brainchild of a local Turkish-born architect, Selcuk Ünyilmaz, was eagerly accepted by the congregation and has received the go-ahead from the city council in Norderstedt, a town near Hamburg.

The turbines will be placed inside the two 22-metre-high minarets and driven by vertically arranged fins rather than the conventional windmill-style rotor blades.

They will be visible from outside the building and the blades will be made of glass to create patterns of light and shade. The aim is for the turbines to provide 30 per cent of the mosque's energy needs and to recoup their cost within 10 years.



"The function of the minaret in the classic sense is receding in Europe because the muezzins don't climb them to call to prayers," Mr Ünyilmaz said. "Even in Islamic countries a microphone is increasingly used.

"We thought about how we could incorporate this important symbolic element of religious architecture and provide it with a new function. Only by using the minarets in this way was I able to reconcile them with the construction budget. The environment is an important issue at present, so this made sense. Everyone has a duty to protect the environment."

Dr Jameleddine Ben Abdeljelil, an expert on Islam at the University of Münster in western Germany, said that from a religious point of view, having a wind turbine in the minaret of a mosque would only be problematic if the electricity were sold on to a third party for profit.


"If the electricity were used to conduct business and earn a profit, that would be problematic, but if it is solely intended to help cover the mosque's own needs, it should be no problem at all," Dr Ben Abdeljelil said.

Construction will not start until the community has raised the money for the €2.5 million (Dh13.2m) project. No public money will be spent on the mosque. "We have to cover it all through donations. If we manage to raise half, the banks would provide the rest of the funding," Ugur Sütcü, a member of the congregation's board, said.

"Everybody here was delighted with the design," Mr Sütcü said, adding that there had been no objections to the idea of putting the minarets to use as power generators. "We want to go ahead with this because our current mosque is an ordinary-looking 100 year-old-building and people who pass by don't recognise it as a mosque." The community has used the present location since 1990.

The project is a novel contribution to Germany's drive towards renewable power generation, which is being intensified after the government's decision last month to phase out all its nuclear power plants by 2021, much sooner than it had intended.

Angela Merkel, the chancellor, wants to put Germany at the forefront of the green energy revolution by raising the share of electricity provided by wind, solar, water and biomass power to 80 per cent by 2050, from 17 per cent now.


The mosque is also part of a push by Germany's 4 million Muslim inhabitants, the majority of them of Turkish descent, to build new mosques and gain increased recognition for their faith after spending decades worshipping in ramshackle prayer rooms and converted backstreet halls.

There are about 200 mosques under construction or being planned in Germany, more than anywhere else in Europe. Projects often encounter resistance from residents fearing an "Islamisation" of Germany.

The Norderstedt mosque, however, has been roundly welcomed and drawn positive reactions from German commentators. "It's not inconceivable that on windy days the eco-mosque could - Inshallah - produce more than it requires for its own purposes," Die Zeit, a national weekly newspaper, wrote in a light-hearted editorial this month.

"That's integration: an environmentally friendly Islam with a carbon-neutral call to prayers. How can anyone claim this religion doesn't belong to Germany?"

Mr Ünyilmaz, the architect, who has lived in Germany for the past 35 years, said the modern design of the mosque reflected the inevitable integration of Muslims into German society.

"In future everyone will grow together, and in 50 to 100 years it may be that no one in the community speaks Turkish anymore. But the faith will remain forever, even after the origins have faded. We already feel like German Muslims. How will our children and grandchildren feel? It is for them that I presented this concept."



http://www.thenational.ae/news/worldwide/europe/first-mosque-with-electricity-generating-wind-turbines-going-up-in-germany?pageCount=0

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #1 on: Jun 24, 2011 11:39 AM »

Salam alaikum!

wow:) mashaAllah.  And may Allah grant them success inshaAllah.

Building a masjid in Germany is a mission.  And I am so pleased they can erect minarets, cuz the majority of masajid in Germany do not have any (i thought there was a law against them??)

Anyway, cant wait to see it!!!

Thanks for posting
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« Reply #2 on: Jun 24, 2011 03:23 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro


Quote
And I am so pleased they can erect minarets, cuz the majority of masajid in Germany do not have any (i thought there was a law against them??)

I think it was Switzerland who proposed the minaret ban.

One thing that is interesting about this venture is the fact that it could possibly be applied to all minarets in the future if the technology can be ironed out.

The Masjid could really become the heart of the community from both a religious and energy perspective!

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #3 on: Jun 27, 2011 06:50 PM »

More good design ideas. Every Mosque should strive to improve their energy ratings!

===============

Roxbury mosque is first Islamic center in US to receive Energy Star

June 26, 2011|Globe Staff


The Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center in Roxbury Crossing.


A Roxbury mosque became the first Islamic center in the country to receive a federal environmental label indicating the facility’s energy performance is better than at least 75 percent of similar buildings nationwide.

The Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center was among four New England congregations recognized this week for earning the Energy Star Label within the past year, officials said.
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Since Energy Star-labeling of congregations began two years ago, 19 congregations nationwide have received the distinction, five of which are in New England, according to program officials. Last June, the First Parish in Needham became the first congregation in the region to receive the label.

The other three congregations in the region that earned the label in the past year were: the Dennis Union Church in Dennis, the Winchester Unitarian Society in Winchester and New England Pentecostal in Pelham, New Hampshire.

Energy Star is a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy.

“These congregations are setting a solid example of financial and environmental stewardship. They have successfully reduced their energy use and are showing all houses of worship across New England that environmental stewardship is possible for all sorts of organizations,” regional administrator of the EPA’s New England office Curt Spalding said in a press release. “We hope more small businesses and congregations will follow their lead and maximize energy efficiency opportunities in their own operations.”

The approximately 70,000 square-foot Islamic center opened in Roxbury Crossing amid community tension two years ago.

Officials said the mosque became a partner of Energy Star one year ago and earned a score of 92 out of 100 on the EPA’s energy performance scale.

“Jawad Benazzi, the facility manager, spearheaded the center’s energy efficiency initiative, purchasing energy efficient appliances in the kitchen and offices and putting signage in areas such as bathrooms and classroom to remind members to conserve whenever possible,” said the EPA release.

“The center had electrical and gas audits conducted by their local utility for free and that helped them to identify energy saving opportunities,” the release continued. “This led to upgrading more than 70 percent of their interior lights. Other improvements included adding motion detectors in bathrooms, and putting reducers on the bathroom faucets to save on water and energy.”
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« Reply #4 on: Jul 04, 2011 07:49 AM »

As-salam-mu-alaikum BrKhalid,

Thank you for considering me in this post. I have been away for awhile... actually working on different Mosque and School projects for different organizations! If you remember, this is how I came to the Madinat Smiley

I really like the designs here...it really forward thinking... I wonder if North America will be ready for modern designs? (inshallah soon) ... one thing to remember is that a lot of older Indian Masjids also had advanced engineering designs, specifically the late Babri Majid. For one, you didn't need a speaker system at all as the wall and ceiling were designed perfectly for sound. Secondly, the dome shaped facility grew away the hot air from the congregation, so you would have an natural air condition system... of course these dome structures will not work in Northern Europe or North America, as it would mean that we would have to heat that entire space in the winter...

One bold design we are experimenting right now with is a masjid for women... it's located about 1500 ft from a top 20 Masjid in the city that has 15800 sq ft for men and less than 200 sq ft for women, including their washroom and shoe area (size of a master bedroom in a house). That masjid has 3 Jummah salaat that are completely full - we would not be competing with them, but rather to complement them and designed without breaking the Sunnah of our religion.

This facility would range from between 4500 to 9000 sq ft (determining the correct size for the community) with the majority of space for women, and a small space for men:) Part of this facilitiy would be used for a Women Resource Centre, and another for a New Muslim Support, a stage two project in the Dawah lifecycle that helps assist new muslims AFTER they accepted Islam (just not keep them hanging). Another key featuring is a training facility that will teach our sisters about empowerment, health and welness, and financial well being.

The hidden secret that is distroying our society is domestic violence in our community. Now we are not yet trained, nor have the appropriate liability insurance required to offere advice at this time, but we can forward them to our existing community network. However, sometimes we have to go to the root cause of violence (I am not justifying violence here)... what I mean here is train people on stress management, on anger management, on how to do a budget properly, so that money doesn't lead to it....anyways...It's in the late stage of development and we are in the lawyer review stage right now and we'll see where it goes...

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

Where's Br UBAB?

I wonder what he thinks of this particular mosque design? bro




BERLIN // A Muslim community in northern Germany plans to build what is believed to be the world's first mosque equipped with wind turbines in its minarets to generate electricity.

The design, the brainchild of a local Turkish-born architect, Selcuk Ünyilmaz, was eagerly accepted by the congregation and has received the go-ahead from the city council in Norderstedt, a town near Hamburg.

The turbines will be placed inside the two 22-metre-high minarets and driven by vertically arranged fins rather than the conventional windmill-style rotor blades.

They will be visible from outside the building and the blades will be made of glass to create patterns of light and shade. The aim is for the turbines to provide 30 per cent of the mosque's energy needs and to recoup their cost within 10 years.



"The function of the minaret in the classic sense is receding in Europe because the muezzins don't climb them to call to prayers," Mr Ünyilmaz said. "Even in Islamic countries a microphone is increasingly used.

"We thought about how we could incorporate this important symbolic element of religious architecture and provide it with a new function. Only by using the minarets in this way was I able to reconcile them with the construction budget. The environment is an important issue at present, so this made sense. Everyone has a duty to protect the environment."

Dr Jameleddine Ben Abdeljelil, an expert on Islam at the University of Münster in western Germany, said that from a religious point of view, having a wind turbine in the minaret of a mosque would only be problematic if the electricity were sold on to a third party for profit.


"If the electricity were used to conduct business and earn a profit, that would be problematic, but if it is solely intended to help cover the mosque's own needs, it should be no problem at all," Dr Ben Abdeljelil said.

Construction will not start until the community has raised the money for the €2.5 million (Dh13.2m) project. No public money will be spent on the mosque. "We have to cover it all through donations. If we manage to raise half, the banks would provide the rest of the funding," Ugur Sütcü, a member of the congregation's board, said.

"Everybody here was delighted with the design," Mr Sütcü said, adding that there had been no objections to the idea of putting the minarets to use as power generators. "We want to go ahead with this because our current mosque is an ordinary-looking 100 year-old-building and people who pass by don't recognise it as a mosque." The community has used the present location since 1990.

The project is a novel contribution to Germany's drive towards renewable power generation, which is being intensified after the government's decision last month to phase out all its nuclear power plants by 2021, much sooner than it had intended.

Angela Merkel, the chancellor, wants to put Germany at the forefront of the green energy revolution by raising the share of electricity provided by wind, solar, water and biomass power to 80 per cent by 2050, from 17 per cent now.


The mosque is also part of a push by Germany's 4 million Muslim inhabitants, the majority of them of Turkish descent, to build new mosques and gain increased recognition for their faith after spending decades worshipping in ramshackle prayer rooms and converted backstreet halls.

There are about 200 mosques under construction or being planned in Germany, more than anywhere else in Europe. Projects often encounter resistance from residents fearing an "Islamisation" of Germany.

The Norderstedt mosque, however, has been roundly welcomed and drawn positive reactions from German commentators. "It's not inconceivable that on windy days the eco-mosque could - Inshallah - produce more than it requires for its own purposes," Die Zeit, a national weekly newspaper, wrote in a light-hearted editorial this month.

"That's integration: an environmentally friendly Islam with a carbon-neutral call to prayers. How can anyone claim this religion doesn't belong to Germany?"

Mr Ünyilmaz, the architect, who has lived in Germany for the past 35 years, said the modern design of the mosque reflected the inevitable integration of Muslims into German society.

"In future everyone will grow together, and in 50 to 100 years it may be that no one in the community speaks Turkish anymore. But the faith will remain forever, even after the origins have faded. We already feel like German Muslims. How will our children and grandchildren feel? It is for them that I presented this concept."



http://www.thenational.ae/news/worldwide/europe/first-mosque-with-electricity-generating-wind-turbines-going-up-in-germany?pageCount=0


Your heart will not truly open until you understand Surah 21 : Verse 92  (Al-Anbiya: The Prophets)

Help Build the Community! Visit:
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« Reply #5 on: Jul 04, 2011 02:33 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

Quote
For one, you didn't need a speaker system at all as the wall and ceiling were designed perfectly for sound. Secondly, the dome shaped facility grew away the hot air from the congregation, so you would have an natural air condition system... of course these dome structures will not work in Northern Europe or North America, as it would mean that we would have to heat that entire space in the winter…


So without getting too technical if you were buidling a masjid from scratch in Europe, how could you reduce air conditioning costs at the design stage?


Or is the problem too difficult given the temperature variations between summer and winter?

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #6 on: Jul 04, 2011 04:09 PM »

This facility would range from between 4500 to 9000 sq ft (determining the correct size for the community) with the majority of space for women, and a small space for men:) Part of this facilitiy would be used for a Women Resource Centre, and another for a New Muslim Support, a stage two project in the Dawah lifecycle that helps assist new muslims AFTER they accepted Islam (just not keep them hanging). Another key featuring is a training facility that will teach our sisters about empowerment, health and welness, and financial well being.

The hidden secret that is distroying our society is domestic violence in our community. Now we are not yet trained, nor have the appropriate liability insurance required to offere advice at this time, but we can forward them to our existing community network. However, sometimes we have to go to the root cause of violence (I am not justifying violence here)... what I mean here is train people on stress management, on anger management, on how to do a budget properly, so that money doesn't lead to it....anyways...It's in the late stage of development and we are in the lawyer review stage right now and we'll see where it goes...

Wow bro that sounds pretty awesome! What a really needed facility for GTA!! A friend of mine just came back from visiting Toronto and couldn't stop gushing about it  Grin "I think I have found the most happening and coolest place on earth yet!!! W awesome malls and plazas, loaded with family fun attractions in every corner of the city, enriched w multi-cultural foods and halal resources, with abundance of masajids, harmonious and very lovely housing areas... Toronto!!!" So there you have it I'm sure she'll be moving up there any day now Wink

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« Reply #7 on: Jul 04, 2011 06:34 PM »

Thank you my sister for your reply.

I wanted to share all the details with all of you for a long time - But I know that I would have been distracted by all the discussions that may happen (do you remember, I used to post 3-5 times a day on slow days:) before WCoastbaba took over that role:) ! ) ... so I had to make a decision ... do I spend time sitting in front a computer in discussions that could *potentially* lead to mindless debates and see an opportunity pass us by or be actually on the ground trying to get things done..

As it is, I'm trying to keep the project team motivated because we are trying to accomplish something that is greater than ourselves, and every day that passes and we have not accomplished our goal, the harder it gets.

Sister Jannah, as you are aware, there are many projects that I have worked with brothers and sisters in the community in the past, however, this one is unique, as this is the first project that I have worked with that involves 'niqabi' sisters.
Although a generation below us, they are bringing in new ideas and life to projects that we couldn't even *imagine* about before... and the level of hiyaa amongst the brothers and sisters have grown so much that it's brought us closer together (A random statement if you think about it > modesty made us closer).

Because this is my first experience, I may need to explain how this was different:... because the project team is spread across nearly 100 miles across the city, so it's not always possible to meet (in person = Live Meetings). In addition, we did meet at the beginning of the process, there was only one sister. She did not feel confortable attending the "live" project meetings as there was a major gender mis-balance, so we setup go-to-meetings, conference bridges and a system of proxies.

So she participanted at that time remotely... so you think her opinion may have been ignored... no, infact... her opinion about any issue was multipled by a factor of 10 vs the opinion of a brother.  In addition, we are luckly to have *two* Sheikhs as part of the team and they are the ones who emphasized the importance of the sister's opinion... and because she choice to protect her modesty in her own way, their love of her as a "oktee" grew  and this spread to the rest of the team... the brothers on the team did something that their not known to do: they listened Smiley

At the same time, if there was an item that she wanted to say, but didn't want to be the source to who brought it up, she would txt/sms or email myself during the meetings to my blackberry, and then I would act as a "proxy" and say the issue as though it was my own...(unless she didn't want the issue disclosed at all).

Now we many multiple sisters of all types (single, married, moms, professionals, students and a mix of in between) on the team and they even have a separate sub-committee meeting in addition to the main one and I was telling the project Amira that when I join their conference call meetings, that I have to keep the microphone on mute so not to keep on saying allahadullilah and mashallah all the time (and keep interupting them every 5 seconds).

Most of us have used up our sick days and time-in-leiu of to make all these visits during the day time, so now we are burning our vacation days to find the perfect locations (so that we don't endanger our jobs)... but it's okay inshallah...

The hardest part to accept as an Islamic worker and as a Manager that manages Project Professionals is that day after day and night after night ...now going on to many months of project meetings, hundreds of pages of meeting minutes, project plans, professional reports, dozens of floor plans, long site visits with real estate agents, the laughter the tears and the dreams: we are now finally closing in on a place that meets the location requirements and is close to a very large population centre that really, really needs this... but since we still don't have a place... and this hurts me more than anything to say this but for all the time we have spent on this project:  


...we still haven't done anything.


I have hope. More importantly though, is that I kindly ask you and the rest of the community for sincere dua to Allah (swt) that we can accomplish what we set out to do... that inshallah it will be actually be greater than ourselves...

Jzk for reading.

  thobebro
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« Reply #8 on: Jul 05, 2011 05:05 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

May Allah grant you guys barakah in this project and may He reward you abundantly for all the self sacrifice.

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #9 on: Jul 07, 2011 06:34 AM »

Salam,

bro ubab, may Allah reward you for all your work and for including sisters on the project (even accommodating niqabi sisters!) and working on a project that is primarily beneficial only for the sisters!! mashaAllah i know few who are active in the community who would dedicate their time and off days from work even for so much planning! i really don't think the 'oldskool' understand the concept of planning for one  smack

it's definitely a good idea to keep the focus on the project on the larger vision and the future. working on something 'greater than ourselves'. building Islamic institutions for the future and working on Mosques will inshaAllah be sadaqah jaariyah for you all.

inshaAllah your hope will soon be reality happy

ws


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