// Horn of Africa tested by severe drought
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« on: Jul 06, 2011 01:18 PM »


Asalaamu Alaikum bro

I am not sure how much coverage this has been getting elsewhere but as ever the pictures are shocking.

Amazing to think that in this time of excess, people are still going hungry and lacking basic food.


Perhaps Sr Halima could give us an idea of what is going on in the area at the moment.




Millions of people in the Horn of Africa are facing severe shortages of food as the worst drought in the region for six decades withers crops and kills livestock, as the BBC's world affairs correspondent Mike Wooldridge reports.

"I had a herd of 200 cows. I took them to Ethiopia when the drought started. All the cows I had taken there died and I came back without a single cow."

That story told by a resident of Wajir district in northern Kenya might not immediately appear to symbolise the humanitarian emergency increasingly gripping swathes of East Africa and the Horn of Africa - in the way that the rapidly growing number of acutely malnourished children trekking out of Somalia does.

But the distress being experienced by pastoralist communities across the affected region also goes a long way in explaining the severity of the current drought, its impact and the limits to the strategies people use to try to protect their livelihoods in such circumstances.

The Wajir cattle herder acted when he saw the grazing for his precious animals drying up.

But in the area of Ethiopia he took them to there turned out to be no greater chance of saving them. They started dropping dead, he says, one by one.

Aid officials estimate that up to half a million cattle have been lost in Ethiopia this year.

It often takes pastoralists at least two years to recover from a severe drought, particularly where it means building up a milking herd again.

This year's drought has hit hard when many people have not yet recovered from the last serious drought in 2009


And the more marginalised the communities - and many of them are - the more likely people are to be pushed over the edge.

Food 'safety net'
 
On top of this, the cost of food is higher than at any time since the price crisis of three years ago.

This deeply alarming combination of factors has resulted in acute malnutrition affecting 35-40% of children under five in a lot of places, according to aid officials - twice the threshold that requires an emergency response.

In parts of southern Somalia - where the conflict between the Islamist extremist group al-Shabab and the Western-backed but weak government make aid operations so difficult - the real level of malnutrition is simply unknown.

One Nairobi-based aid official said: "In southern Somalia, it is not inappropriate to start worrying about it becoming a famine."

Thousands of Somalis have arrived at Kenya's Dadaab refugee camp in recent weeks There have been many pledges over the years that lessons have been learnt from the humanitarian crises of the past - all the more relevant for this region of the world because of the history of famine in Ethiopia, Somalia and Sudan.

In Ethiopia, there is now a food "safety net" scheme assisting some eight million people vulnerable to chronic food shortages.

They are often supplied for food in return for work, and the idea is that many can also get access to micro-credit and to ways of helping them generate their own income.

The advantage of supplying food aid on a planned basis and not just once an emergency has struck, aid officials say, is that it can help prevent the need to sell off livestock or take children out of school.

And the hope is that it helps to build up the resilience of people in vulnerable communities.

Early warning
 
Britain's Department for International Development promised an increased focus on this after a recent review of its response to humanitarian emergencies.

But even in a year of good weather conditions, Ethiopia still needs food assistance over and above the safety net scheme.

 
New government figures for the requirement in the light of the deepening drought are expected imminently.

This crisis will be a test, too, of the increased effort that has been made in recent years in Ethiopia to monitor and manage malnutrition among children in the community to reduce the numbers ending up in feeding centres during crises.

Famine early warnings - of the kind we are seeing now in East Africa and the Horn of Africa - and projects designed to help people resist the impact of disasters are not new, but they have attracted increasing attention.

Once it seemed highly likely that a drought described as "the worst in 60 years" would mean that the number of people affected would be similarly record-breaking - as potentially would be the number of deaths.

Now the hope is that this link is being broken and, given a sufficiently timely and adequate response, while such an emergency will still be very serious, those do not have to be the consequences.

But across parched lands and in countless hard-pressed communities - and almost certainly in Somalia above all - that is the challenge now.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-14023160

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #1 on: Jul 07, 2011 06:21 AM »

walaikum salaam wrt,

I can't believe American media has not shown a single thing about this!! The Casey Anthony case has just consumed the media the last few days. Very sad. InshaAllah we will pray for them and donate what we can.
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« Reply #2 on: Jul 07, 2011 08:28 PM »

salaam,

Oddly enough my friends were just in Ethiopia and one of them got real sick from some bad chicken. Like really sick, she had to take Cipro when she got back home. Wondering how old that chicken was...anyway, pray for them and donate where you can. I dont get our news channels- what they consider newsworthy and whats not. Remember in the 80's or so when this same area had that bad bad drought. I think TIME magazine had some really distressing covers back then...: http://www.time.com/time/covers/0,16641,19871221,00.html..that was Ethiopia...now it's really affecting the Somalians horribly...

 
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« Reply #3 on: Jul 08, 2011 02:28 AM »


Perhaps Sr Halima could give us an idea of what is going on in the area at the moment.

I am not yet back home but in the case of Kenya, the government, the UN (WFP and UNICEF), NGO's - both local and international - the Kenyan Muslim community respond by airlifting and transporting food and water to the affected areas and people. The government has a Drought Emergency Preparedness Plan in place (it might not be that effective but it does what it can do). The UN and the international NGO's bring the severity of the situation to the international community.  

I believe the same goes for Ethiopia.

As for Somalia, its the UN, the NGO's and the Somali community in the diaspora. The Somali diaspora is great in responding to this kind of situation. But then again, the rampant lawlessness hampers effective response a great deal in the case of Somalia.

Drought is a vicious cycle in Northern/North Eastern Kenya, Parts of Ethiopia and Somalia.

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #4 on: Jul 08, 2011 11:32 AM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

A press release from the Disaster Emergency Committee (DEC) in the UK which has Islamic Relief as one of its members.




DEC announces East Africa Crisis Appeal


Leading UK humanitarian agencies are launching a joint appeal to help more than 10 million people in East Africa parts of which are suffering their worst drought in over half a century.

Caught up in the crisis are thousands of families trekking for days across parched scrubland from Somalia to Kenya – including barefoot children with no food or water.

The Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) announced today (Thursday, 7.7.11) that appeals will be broadcast on Friday by ITV/ITN, BBC, Sky, Channel 4 and Channel Five.


DEC Chief Executive Brendan Gormley said:

“Slowly but surely, these people have seen their lives fall apart – crops, livestock and now their homes have been taken by the drought.

“They’ve been left with no alternative but to seek shelter and life-saving help elsewhere. We have a duty to help quickly before the situation spirals out of control.”

Large areas of Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia are affected and the DEC appeal will also include South Sudan – set to become the world’s newest country on July 9.

More than 1,300 people a day, the majority of them children, are arriving in the Dadaab refugee camp in eastern Kenya near the border with Somalia.

The Dadaab camp was already the world’s largest refugee camp with a population of 350,000 – larger than the city of Leicester


“Of course these people need a long-term solution with investment and political will – but right now it’s about preventing a tragedy,” said Mr Gormley.

“Many of these are a forgotten people, caught in the midst of conflict in Somalia and an ever-worsening environmental crisis.”


Agencies will be working through local partners to access remote and difficult to reach areas across East Africa with food, water, therapeutic feeding for malnourished children and medical treatment.

Despite the enormous challenges of reaching those affected in Somalia in particular, DEC agencies and their partners are already helping hundreds of thousands of people - but their work is being severely hampered by a lack of funding.

The UK has taken a lead among the world’s governments with a pledge of £38m to the World Food Programme of the UN, which will provide the food aid that many of the DEC’s members will be distributing.  The UN’s own appeal is only 40% funded.

The DEC does not set fundraising targets for its appeals and its member agencies are continuing to pursue funding from a range of potential sources to bridge the shortfall in East Africa.


http://www.dec.org.uk/item/508

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #5 on: Jul 09, 2011 12:16 AM »

^ well I put above topic & link on how to donate on F/book status. Not a single 'like' or comment! Funny how suddenly people become oblivious to what's going on.

Just makes me mad & sad at the same time.

Very very sad  Angry Sad

وَلَسَوْفَ يُعْطِيكَ رَبُّكَ فَتَرْضَىٰ

And soon will your Lord give you so that you shall be well pleased.
Al Qur'an (93:5)
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« Reply #6 on: Jul 20, 2011 11:27 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

The UN today declared a famine in Somalia which is facing its worse drought in half a century.

Interestingly though, most media seem more concerned about phone hacking rather than people dying!!



Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #7 on: Jul 20, 2011 11:39 PM »

Assalamu Alaiykum.

Exactly bro. This famine is a scandal, people dying due to hunger is a scandal instead of phone hacking. I'm not saying phone hacking is alright, but compared to this story about the famine... It really doesn't compare.  Sad

وَلَسَوْفَ يُعْطِيكَ رَبُّكَ فَتَرْضَىٰ

And soon will your Lord give you so that you shall be well pleased.
Al Qur'an (93:5)
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« Reply #8 on: Jul 21, 2011 06:29 PM »

Salam,

The video is very sad. So many of the women and children suffering as well. Animals dead, plants dead, nothing left that they're all moving to camps. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-14221766

Good to remember as we complain about the heat and fasting coming up..."Where is the UN, where are the Muslim countries", one woman asks.  They don't have any fancy ac's or huge iftars. We live in such true comfort but never realize it!!
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« Reply #9 on: Jul 22, 2011 10:20 AM »

Salam alaikum

This is a total humanitarian disaster.  Famine in 2011?? We should all be ashamed of ourselves, subhanAllah!  This should not be allowed to happen, may Allah provide relief for these people and forgive us our inability to free them of hunger.

We have a very reliable charity called Gift of the Givers (http://www.giftofthegivers.org) - they have taken some aid, but there are no other huge international charities active there, for many reasons.  As it is, there is unrest there, and even getting the aid in is difficult, but we have to try and help!   

The pictures and videos are just terrible. 
Wasalam
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« Reply #10 on: Jul 22, 2011 03:13 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro


There are so many issues around this story; war, violence, corruption, imperialism etc


An average mother who lives in the area, however, only cares about the food she can provide her hungry children


We live in a media driven world where celebrity and scandal appear to be more newsworthy than people starving and families being torn apart.


Are Rupert Murdoch or Casey Anthony really that more important?


Perhaps we are culpable as much as the media in allowing ourselves to be sucked into such tittle tattle because the hadith does say:


“Part of the perfection of someone’s Islam is his leaving alone that which does not concern him.”



Allah knows best.



PS I am not sure that link to the video is working?

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #11 on: Jul 31, 2011 05:30 PM »

I thought rains would help Sad Maybe long term... Don't know anything about this group but why would they prevent aid. Nice of the pope to bring attention to the famine. Hope people send food instead of missionaries. -- J.


================================================

Rains add misery to Somalia's famine refugees

APBy ABDI GULED - Associated Press | AP – 5 mins ago


MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP) — Tens of thousands of famine-stricken Somali refugees were cold and drenched after torrential rains pounded their makeshift structures overnight into early Sunday in the capital, leading to appeals for aid.

Rains are needed to plant crops and alleviate the drought that has lead to famine in Somalia, but they added to the misery of many refugees who live in structures made of sticks, flattened milk cans and pieces of cloth.

Disgruntled refugees in several camps in Mogadishu said that more aid is needed.

"We are living in plight, we left our homes, lost our animals and farms so we ask everyone to help us to survive," Abdi Muse Abshir said.

Lul Hussein, a mother of five, said her family had a sleepless night after their makeshift home crumbled.

"We are starved and we don't have enough help," she said. "Who's helping us? No one! So we are already between death and bad life."

Aid agencies have limited reach in Somalia where Islamist militants are waging an insurgency against the country's weak U.N.-backed government.

The most dangerous group among the militants __ the al-Qaida-linked al-Shabab __ has barred major relief organizations from operating in the territories it controls.

The U.N. fears tens of thousands already have died in Somalia
in areas held by the Islamist rebels because food aid could not reach them.

The African Union peacekeeping force anticipates that al-Shabab may try to attack the camps that now house tens of thousands of famine refugees in Mogadishu, disrupting even further the distribution of food aid. The AU force launched a new offensive Thursday to push the militants' front line farther back from the camps.

The drought and the famine it has caused in Somalia have affected more than 11.8 million people in the Horn of Africa and created a triangle of hunger where the borders of Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia meet.

The World Program says it cannot reach 2.2 million Somalis who live in al-Shabab controlled territory in south-central Somalia.

The refugees in the camps in Mogadishu complained that camps are cramped with makeshift homes that have little privacy.

"We can't even change our clothes because everyone is here," said Mumino Jimale. "We ask the world to help us in getting better settlements to be safe from cold and rains."

Also Sunday, Pope Benedict XVI urged the world not to forget to the victims of famine in the Horn of Africa during his weekly blessing to pilgrims.

"It is forbidden to be indifferent in the face of the tragedy of the starving," the pope said from his summer residence in Castelgandolfo, south of Rome, Italy.

The pope invited the faithful "to think of the many brothers and sisters who in these days, in the Horn of Africa, are suffering the dramatic consequences of famine, aggravated by war and the absence of solid institutions."

Aid agencies say the region's drought is one of the worst in years in terms of the number of people affected.

Thousands of Somali refugees are flooding camps in Ethiopia and Kenya in search of food after several seasons without rain decimated livestock and killed crops in their homeland.
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« Reply #12 on: Jul 31, 2011 09:40 PM »

I thought rains would help Sad Maybe long term... Don't know anything about this group but why would they prevent aid. Nice of the pope to bring attention to the famine.

Weakened livestock and humans can not withstand heavy torrential rains. They are too weak to stand the down pour. Lack of better shelter compounds the misery for the people.

Quote
Hope people send food instead of missionaries. -- J.

I hope not too, though it is difficult to convert Somalis in Somalia. The problem is if and when children are taken from weaker or dead parents - though relatives rally around them. This happened once before in time of same severe kind of famine in the early 90's.

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #13 on: Aug 01, 2011 05:05 AM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

This is one story where the saying 'out of sight, out of mind' rings true.

The pictures of starving children in this age of affluence are truly shocking.

Whilst Ramadhan days may be long during these summer months, at least we have the luxury of being able to break our fasts.

Whilst we may stand in Taraweeh for an hour or so, at least we don't have to trek across the desert for days in search for food.


A stark reminder indeed of how blessed we are just to be alive and healthy!!

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #14 on: Aug 01, 2011 02:31 PM »


Whilst Ramadhan days may be long during these summer months, at least we have the luxury of being able to break our fasts.

How true!

Quote
Whilst we may stand in Taraweeh for an hour or so, at least we don't have to trek across the desert for days in search for food.

Allahu Akbar!


Quote
A stark reminder indeed of how blessed we are just to be alive and healthy!!

Indeed!

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #15 on: Aug 01, 2011 05:42 PM »

Turkish foundation to send aid materials to Somalia

According to a statement released by the IHH, the Foundation will send the aid materials to Somalia's capital of Mogadishu on Wednesday.

The Foundation For Human Rights and Freedoms and Humanitarian Relief (IHH) will send 40 tonnes of aid materials to Somalia in a cargo jet.

According to a statement released by the IHH, the Foundation will send the aid materials to Somalia's capital of Mogadishu on Wednesday.

The aid materials include baby food, rice, sugar and oil as well as medical items.
To date, the IHH has distributed food items to 45,000 Somalians.
AA

http://www.worldbulletin.net/index.php?aType=haber&ArticleID=76923

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #16 on: Aug 03, 2011 04:33 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum

Amidst all our talk of samosas, pink milk etc, this story really does put things into perspective  Sad



Somali refugees: No food to break Ramadan fast



DADAAB, Kenya—As the Islamic holy month of Ramadan begins, Faduma Aden is fasting all day even though she doesn't have enough food to celebrate with a sundown feast. The Somali mother of three, who fled starvation in her homeland, says she fasts because she fears God



Muslims around the world mark sundown during Ramadan with extravagant dinners after not eating from sunrise to sundown. That kind of nighttime celebration is unthinkable this year for most Somalis, who are enduring the worst famine in a generation.


And even though Islam allows the ailing to eat, for many Somalis it's a matter of faith to participate in Ramadan's fast.


"It hard for me to fast, but I did fast for fear of God," said Aden, who is among tens of thousands who have made the arduous journey, often on foot, to this refugee camp in neighboring Kenya


Others, like Mohamed Mohamud Abdulle, are ashamed they don't have food "to console the soul" at sundown after fasting all day.

"How will I fast when I don't have something to break it?" asked Abdulle. "All my family are hungry and I have nothing to feed them. I feel the hunger that forced me from my home has doubled here."


For much of the Muslim world, Ramadan this year falls at a time of political upheaval. Food prices typically spike during the Muslim religious month, and the elaborate dinners many in the Middle East put on to break the daily fast drive a deep hole in household budgets.


Fleeing Somalis say they have already been forced by famine to fast for weeks or months, without the end-of-day meal to regain their strength.


"I cannot fast because I cannot get food to break it and eat before the morning," said Nur Ahmed, a father of six at a camp for displaced people in the Somali capital, Mogadishu, whose wife died last year during childbirth.


Sheik Ali Sheik Hussein, a mosque leader in Mogadishu, called it "worrying" that many Somalis cannot fast because they are already weak from hunger and don't have food to regain their strength after sundown.



"We have asked all Muslims to donate to help those dying from hunger," he said. "Muslims should not be silent on this situation, so we shall help if Allah wills."


At a hospital run by the International Committee of the Red Cross in the Dadaab camp, clinician Muhammed Hussein breaks away from examining a patient to note that his Ramadan fast gives him greater understanding of the suffering of famine victims.


"It gives you a lot of sympathy when you yourself feel hungry, you will understand the pain of someone who has not eaten... With this kind of severe malnutrition, people have no energy to walk, they have been walking from Kismayo in Somalia to this place. It gives you that heart to feel mercy for the people who are suffering."


In a Ramadan statement Monday, President Barack Obama said fasting can be used to "increase spirituality, discipline, and consciousness of God's mercy." Obama said now is a time for the world to come together to support famine relief efforts.


"The heartbreaking accounts of lost lives and the images of families and children in Somalia and the Horn of Africa struggling to survive remind us of our common humanity and compel us to act," Obama said.


Some in the communities around the Dadaab refugee camp are stepping forward to help. At the Dagahaley refugee camp, part of the larger Dadaab camps, three distribution centers run by local elders provide food and money each day for more than 1,000 families and individuals.


Moved by tragic scenes of haggard mothers and emaciated children, Somalis in the diaspora are wiring hundreds of dollars to community leaders so they can buy food and clothes for the new arrivals.


"The hunger and suffering faced by the new arrivals have moved us into action," said Hussein Sheik Mohamed, part of a team of volunteers who accepts donations from Somalis around the world and distributes aid.


The Dadaab initiative started with people at nearby mosques who wanted to respond to the needs of refugees pouring into the camp. They called former refugees to help new arrivals with whatever they can find: Food, money, clothing and mattresses were donated.


The U.N. says more than 11 million people in the Horn of Africa need food aid, but 2.2 million are in peril in a region of south-central Somalia controlled by the al-Qaida-linked militant group al-Shabab that is largely inaccessible to aid groups.


In a bit of good news, however, the International Committee of the Red Cross said Monday it was now distributing food to 162,000 people in south-central Somalia -- the first large-scale distribution in the region since the beginning of the year.


"This operation demonstrates the ICRC's ability to deliver emergency aid directly to the people affected in southern Somalia," said Andrea Heath. "But this distribution assists only a small percentage of those in need. More aid will be required to help the population bridge the gap until the next harvest in December."


Salad Salah is one of those still in need. He fled to a refugee camp in Mogadishu, and said that participating in Ramadan this year would be a form of "suicide."


"We wouldn't like to miss Ramadan but the conditions here say we must," he said.



http://www.boston.com/news/world/africa/articles/2011/08/01/somali_refugees_no_food_to_break_ramadan_fast/?page=full

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #17 on: Aug 08, 2011 05:48 AM »

A new blog by Sh. Hamza Yusuf talking about the beauty of Somalia...

http://sandala.org/blog/2011/08/07/ramadan-when-feeding-others-in-need-supersedes-our-own-hunger-and-greed/
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« Reply #18 on: Aug 08, 2011 01:37 PM »

Quote
In fact, the Somali of Mauritania are descendants of Somali migrants from East Africa.

Never knew about that! The Somali of Mauritania?

I worked with a colleague from Mauritania once.

Everything he said about Somalia and its people is true. Its unfortunate that the civil war destroyed such a country. That is what most people know about and plus the drought.

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #19 on: Aug 10, 2011 01:47 AM »

Maasha-Allah. May Allah SWT reward their efforts. Ameen.

LIVE - NOW SHOWING

http://www.islamchannel.tv/

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #20 on: Sep 06, 2011 06:35 AM »

Asalaamu Alaikum

Sad to see but it looks like things are still very bad with this latest report saying 750,000 people will die in Somalia because of the famine.

For those who haven't read Br Ikramuddin's Ramadhan Diary from Mogadishu, then please do because it really does put into perspective what is going on there at the moment.


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/un-warns-of-750000-deaths-as-somalia-famine-area-spreads-2349806.html


Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #21 on: Sep 06, 2011 10:59 AM »

Br Ikramuddin's had said the worst was yet to come. Its back in the news, saw it on CNN. Its distressing.

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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