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Author Topic: Dubai Burj Khalifa: Ramadan fast 'lasts longer high up'  (Read 1495 times)
jannah
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« on: Aug 08, 2011 05:31 AM »

Wow... wonder how far above sea level we are? And this brings up that ages old question of what happens when we have space stations and things Smiley

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Dubai Burj Khalifa: Ramadan fast 'lasts longer high up'

A drawback of the high-life?

Muslims living in the world's tallest building, the Burj Khalifa, should fast longer during the Ramadan holy month, Dubai's leading clerics have said.

During Ramadan, Muslims are supposed to not eat or drink between dawn and dusk.

"Burj Khalifa is almost one km (0.6 miles) high, which means people in higher floors can still see the sun after it has set on the ground," Ahmed Abdul Aziz al-Haddad told Reuters.

He said they should break their fast two minutes after those on the ground.

Another Dubai cleric, Mohammed al-Qubaisi, has been quoted as saying that people living above the 80th floor should fast for an extra two minutes, while those on the 150th floor and higher should wait for three more minutes before eating or drinking.

The 828m- (2,716ft-) high Burj Khalifa has 160 floors and was opened in 2010.

The clerics say there are ancient precedents in Islamic law.

Mr Qubaisi said that under such rulings, people living on mountains should also break their fast after those at ground level.

Ramadan began last week.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-14437334
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lucid
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« Reply #1 on: Aug 08, 2011 04:50 PM »

assalamualaikum

so what happens if you're in a plane, or in a spaceship.  suppose you are in a deep tunnnel underground? 

seems a bit silly...

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BrKhalid
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« Reply #2 on: Aug 09, 2011 06:23 AM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

Perhaps part of this issue is the modern day reliance we have on timetables instead of observing natural phenomena.

Back in the 'old days', fasting ended once the sun had dipped beneath the horizon and obviously  if one is on a mountain, one will tend to see the sun for longer as compared to a person at sea level.

Obviously there are different rulings if one is traveling as opposed to being on the ground (all be it very far up!)

If buildings get very much taller, however, there could be this strange phenomena where a person could break his fast on the ground floor, take a high speed lift and then join his family breaking fast on the top floor!
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« Reply #3 on: Aug 09, 2011 06:54 AM »

Logic aside, its kind of confusing. But really, what is 2 minutes or even three, after having fasted all day?
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akhan
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« Reply #4 on: Aug 09, 2011 02:00 PM »

Quote
If buildings get very much taller, however, there could be this strange phenomena where a person could break his fast on the ground floor, take a high speed lift and then join his family breaking fast on the top floor
Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy I am definitely gonna try that, when the mile high tower gets built in Jeddah and if I happen to be there at the right time, InshAllah.
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akhan
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« Reply #5 on: Aug 10, 2011 02:08 AM »

The only person that can rival Sheikh Muhammad bin Rashid Al Maktoum's extravagance is Prince Al Waleed bin Talal. I like the fact that he's building a whole city to go with the tower - Middle Eastern Manhattan Smiley
Also, as with every major construction project in the Kingdom, the Binladin group has been awarded the contract.

A very exciting piece of news yet very scary. When bedouins compete with each other in building tall structures, the End is near.

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/technology-blog/kingdom-tower-set-world-record-tallest-mega-skyscraper-170649407.html

Saudi Arabia's soaring structure will boast 59 elevators and a dramatic 'sky terrace'
A new building soon to be under construction in Saudi Arabia will bump the world's current tallest structure from its sky-high first place status. The futuristic mega-skyscraper known as the Kingdom Tower will be built in Jeddah, a cosmopolitan, commercially-minded port city on the Red Sea. The challenger for the world's tallest building title intends to surpass its closest competition — Dubai's Burj Khalifa — by at least 568 feet.
The Burj Khalifa, completed in 2010, measures a soaring 2,717 feet, but the Kingdom Tower will stand at least 3,281 feet tall, according to Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill — the Chicago-based team that dreamed up the design. Earlier plans for the record-breaking structure put the tower at mile high, but were abandoned due to concerns that arose in soil testing for the site. The triangular structure will be the focal point of Kingdom City, a sprawling urban development that will cost a reported $20 billion.
Kingdom Tower will house a Four Seasons hotel, upscale office space, ultra-luxurious condos (of course), and the world's soon-to-be tallest observatory. Residents will be able to take a trip up on one of the building's 59 elevators, which travel at over 33 feet per second (22 miles per hour), and enjoy the private sky terrace on the 157th floor.
According to its creators, the monolithic skyscraper will serve as a dual symbol for the city of Jeddah— both cultural and religious. Jeddah is often considered the "gateway to Mecca" due to its proximity to the Islamic holy city, and the Kingdom Tower monument will represent both Jeddah's historic symbolism in Islam as well as Saudi Arabia's prominence in international business.
While only very preliminary construction is underway at the future site of the Kingdom Tower, there are plenty of stunning skyward concept images to marvel at in the interim.
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« Reply #6 on: Aug 10, 2011 02:31 AM »


so what happens if you're in a plane, or in a spaceship.  suppose you are in a deep tunnnel underground? 

seems a bit silly...


Actually, fasting in space and making salat in "microgravity" conditions have already been addressed with an assortment of fatwas.  Wink

http://www.space.com/4389-malaysia-muslim-astronaut-fast-space-ramadan-minister.html

Malaysia's Muslim Astronaut Needn't Fast in Space During Ramadan, Says Minister
by Sean Yoong, Associated Press WriterDate: 24 September 2007 Time: 03:05 PM ET

PUTRAJAYA, Malaysia (AP) – Malaysia's first astronaut will not be required to fast while in space even though he is a Muslim and the flight will be during Ramadan, a government minister said Monday.

"When you travel there is no compulsion to fast," Science Minister Jamaluddin Jarjis told reporters.

Sheikh Muszaphar Shukor, 35, is one of three people who will lift off in a Russian space craft on Oct. 10 for a 10-day mission in the International Space Station. He has said that as a good Muslim he hopes to fast in space even though his main priority is to conduct scientific experiments.

But Jamaluddin said Sheikh Muszaphar, who has been fasting during training along with his backup Faiz Khaleed, can postpone the fasting until after he returns.

The fasting month of Ramadan started on Sept. 13 and is expected to end on Oct. 12, which means Sheikh Muszaphar will have to fast for only two or three days if he insists on not eating from dawn to dusk, an Islamic religious requirement.

Jamaluddin also said he expects Sheikh Muszaphar to pray only three times a day instead of the obligatory five to reduce the inconvenience of going through prayer rituals in the gravity-free atmosphere.

Observant Muslims are required to turn toward Mecca in Saudi Arabia, and pray five times a day while kneeling. However that becomes difficult in zero gravity while the space station is circling the Earth 16 times a day.

Malaysia's National Fatwa Council has ruled that the astronaut will not be required to kneel to pray if the absence of gravity makes it too hard, nor will he have to wash hands and face with water as required – a simple wet towel will do.

Jamaluddin said Malaysia is hoping to send a second astronaut into space, depending on public support for the first mission. He said the second mission would cost US$30 million (euro21.5 million), but the long term benefits would be worth it.

"If there is good strong public support we should continue the mission to sustain the awareness. We should look not only on short term return but also medium to long term."

Meanwhile, Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi wished Sheikh Muszaphar success.

"I pray that this mission will proceed according to plan, safely and successfully," he said.

Sheikh Muszaphar will return to earth Oct. 20 along with two members of the station's current crew, cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov.
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« Reply #7 on: Aug 10, 2011 01:04 PM »

Salam alaikum

I wonder if he will be the first Muslim in space? it's kinda exciting!  And there's nothing different that they've said he should/shouldnt do from normal travelling is there?  And what about health risks in space? Maybe fasting is not good for your health in zero gravity?   

Sorry, fasting brain not all there after a morning filled with high-powered meetings.

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p.s I get the whole being able to see the sun set high up longer than on the ground...never thought if it honestly, but alhamdulillah, never to old to get a new thought or two Wink Cheesy Embarrassed Cool
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akhan
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« Reply #8 on: Aug 10, 2011 01:35 PM »

I wonder if he will be the first Muslim in space?

Naah..there have been many before him. This guy is the latest Muslim to go into space. The first was Prince Sultan Ibn Salman of Saudi Arabia. My dad led the team that set up the hotline for him to talk to his father from space. He was also one of the only two Arabs that ever went into space.
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