Madinat al-Muslimeen Community

*


Login with username, password and session length

From the news...

Double, double toil and tazkiyah.


Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: On Jawami al-Kalam & Adab aka PLEASE READ Madinans!!  (Read 1980 times)
Abu Khaled
Bro
Newbie
*

Reputation Power: 11
Abu Khaled has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 37


« on: Sep 10, 2011 12:29 PM »


Bismillah Al-Rahman Al-Raheem

Assalam alaikum wa rahmatullah.

Is it me, or is there just a liiittle too much love in this thread? Lol.

I'm about to derail the thread. Feel free to relocate the post if you think it doesn't belong here, other threads could equally have lit the touchpaper.

Our Beloved Prophet - sallallahu alayhi wassalam - is said to have had a particular quality, that of jawami al-kalam. Perhaps one of you erudite folks can give an appropriate translation, but I have understood it to mean comprehensiveness of speech. I've seen others translate it as conciseness of speech. About which - on the authority of our teachers, Allah ta'ala bless them - I have understood that he - sallallahu alayhi wassalam - could convey much through saying/expressing little. Take the famous (and lengthy) hadith of Umm Zar'a, which may be an apt example given this thread, about the 11 women who were discussing their husbands (this hadith is mentioned, amongst other places, in the Shama'il of Imam Tirmidhi and the Sahih of Imam Muslim, radhi'Allahu ta'ala 'anhu).

Qadi Iyad - radhi'Allahu 'anh - the famous author of the absolutely seminal, and indispensable, work, Ash-Shifa fi Ma'rifat Huquq Al-Mustafa [The Healing Concerning the Knowledge of the Rights of the Chosen One (sallallahu alayhi wassalam), commonly known as just Ash-Shifa], is said to have written a (circa) 300 page commentary on this one hadith alone. So imagine then the lessons it must contain!

We like to talk about the the Sunnah, about emulating our Beloved Rasul'Allah - sallallahu alayhi wassalam - so what about striving to embody this quality too - of jawami al-kalam - as this is a Prophetic Sunnah as well. We should wonder why it takes some of us so long to make a point. The amount of words/posts we expend belabouring our, often ill-conceived, opinions. Why do we face so much opposition and resistance? Is it really always because others are wrong? Or could it be because we're too blind to see that we're not right?

So, I ask me, and us all, let us look to our words/posts on this board, and ask ourselves, of what utility are they in serving our objective when writing them? To be sure, there is no impunity from what we post, we will each be accounted for every single post we make, and each word that we write. So, will they be in our favour, or will they go against us? Surely that should be our measure before posting?

Yet it would seem some of us readly click "send" - time and again - on posts that foment negativity, offence, and in reality, lead to little by way of positive contribution and enrichment, regardless of our lofty intentions (which sometimes mask delusions that point to diseases of the heart). In fact, one might argue that some contributors' posts end up proving a negative example of Islam and/or Muslims. What a sad state of affairs. I don't want my words, or worse, me, to be  treated/considered as an example of how not to be. Not exactly a good look. The absence of adab [courtesy] towards your Brothers/Sisters when engaging with them, is itself a reason to question oneself and one's intention when posting. Some posts are patronising, self-indulgent, insensitively articulated and way too personal. And wisdom dictates knowing not to constantly raise contentious themes, especially when you don't know the sensitivities of those on the other side of the screen. Some of us act as if expressing one's opinion in public is more important than preventing the fallout it could lead to, on our scale of priorities. Which, to anyone with sufficient sense, maturity, and a degree of responsibility to this online community, as well as to the wider Muslim community, is entirely forseeable, and thus less excusable. Bearing in mind that the kinds of trigger issues that tend to inflame others and provoke unislamic responses, are often not even supposed to be debated over ipse dixit.  

Moreover, when an attitude of condescension and disdain pervades the lines between, then it is time to account oneself. Surely that is better, and more appropriate, than being accounted by Him - subhanahu wa ta'ala - on that day when you'll be asked whether you usurped the rights of your fellow Brothers/Sisters upon you, on this board.  

When the harm of your posts outweighs the benefit, it is time to re-evaluate the merit in posting. And remember, Allah ta'ala blinds one to their own faults, by preoccupying them with the faults of others. I have come across fewer, more obvious truisms in my life than this. Indeed I learned this the hard way through reflection and introspection, yet still I fall prey to it, may Allah ta'ala protect and forgive me from such a nasty trait.

You have to wonder, why does someone write on a messageboard? Presumably because they want to be read? And why do they want to be read? Because they feel they have something of value to say, an opinion they want to air, no? So how is it then, that some of us, when we write, instead of the content of what we write forming a substantive contribution and a worthwhile discussion, actually ends up itself becoming the subject of a fractured polemic?? Rather than the point(s) you're seeking to make, fostering some productive understanding, your post/thread itself becomes the headline of heated debate, consternation and worse, fitna? I see no sense in framing posts in a way such that what you're trying to say gets drowned out by how you're saying it. What value, exactly, does such a post/thread, possess? What has been achieved? And along the way, how much of it has counted towards your akhira??

Intense argumentation - I'm not saying this thread contains argumentation, this is just a general reminder - is seriously blameworthy in Islam, even if you are right. That is, the fact that you're engaged in intense argumentation is enough to render sin upon you, regardless of your being in the right. Such is the severity of how argumentation is viewed in the Deen.

I think I've said the following before, so apologies to those of you for whom this is repetitive.

There is someone in this world I've never met, yet to whom I consider I owe a massive debt. Because something this person once said managed to etch itself into my consciousness such that I'm sure it has saved me many a time from allowing myself to be drawn into a debate/dialogue which would have been detrimental to my hereafter, wallahu a'lam.

It was during a particularly heated and prolonged online discussion concerning a contentious topic. Too many of the participants were allowing themselves to get wound up, the mood was turning ugly in some quarters, a few tempers were flaring, the tone of the language had deteriorated, and things were getting personal.

In the midst of such charged atmospheres, voices of reason and sanity often tend to get drowned out and sidelined, as people are too far gone in their heatedness/entrenchment. Yet out of the haze, emerged this lone voice - I remember it as if it were yesterday - with such a simple, yet sublime, counsel, which - to these eyes at least - suddenly froze time, as it cut cleanly through all that invective, and shook me at least, to my core:

Should you find yourself unable to present your argument and retain your adab too, drop the argument and preserve your adab - surely that is more beneficial to you.

As if struck by a massive blow to the chest, I suddenly realised that we were being addressed by one of the Ahl-Allah [People of Allah]. We're not talking about a scholar, nobody famous, not "a name." Just someone whom Allah ta'ala had allowed to manifest the Prophetic quality of jawami al-kalam at that point in time. Right then and there, for all the high-level scholarly discussion I'd been following on that thread, transfixed and drawn into the to-and-fro of the debate betwen learned parties on both sides of the fence - including people whose opinion I respected - on a spotlight issue which was being discussed the world over - I had a fath [opening]. An epiphany. And it dawned on me that none of it mattered, because for me, the whole point of my involvement in that prolonged polemic was for Allah ta'ala to bring me to this point, this realisation. That this, was my lesson, my take-away from the thread. The rest of it was by the by.

And what a lesson, subhan'Allah. Years later and it is still etched within me. Because there is only so far you can stretch elastic before it either snaps back, or breaks. Either way, it's gonna hurt.

I appreciate that just quoting the above counsel may lack effect/impact since you didn't experience all that led up to it - I guess you had to be there to maybe really appreciate the profundity and layered nature of the advice - but insha'Allah those who prefer to pay attention to the road signs that are there to help avoid crashes, will take heed. For the others, including myself, we should make du'a that Allah ta'ala open their/our eyes to a way which is better. Imam al-Haddad - radhi'Allahu 'anh - is purported to have advised that gentility can often reach the places that harshness cannot.

If we cannot engage with one another with adab, then better not to engage at all. Because it might be that the cost to your akhira is too great. And practically, of what utility is a post that doesn't serve it's objective? If you find yourself having to defend your points repeatedly, or re-explain yourself, for how long will you continue to consider that the other is mistaken before considering the possibility, that, you know what, it might just be me?

Being right isn't always best for the nafs [ego]. Many valuable lessons are to be learnt from accepting that one is wrong. Yet the nafs likes to ride roughshod over the self and be in charge. It hates letting go. But you must, if you have any serious concern for your own spiritual welfare, wrestle it, defeat such spiritual sicknesses, and take control. Debate and discussion - especially in environments where people are strongly opinionated yet lack the temperament to control their tongues/tones when facing disagreement or opposition - are classic breeding grounds for bacteria like riya [pretentiousness], one-upmanship, entrenchment, ad-hominem digs, argumentation, disputation, contention, etc., that eat away at the soul. Some of which cause hardening of hearts. Others of which lead to, or risk, admixing pure intentions with some corrupted element. And who would want to accept an offer to drink from a glass of water that contained even a drop of urine?

It is related - on the authority of our teachers, may Allah ta'ala preserve them - that Imam ash-Shafi'i - radhi'Allahu 'anh - is reported to have have said that he never debated someone save that he wished the truth would appear on their tongue, so that he could submit to it.

If you're going to say something, make it priceless, not meaningless.

(By the way, I am completely aware of the irony of mentioning jawami al-kalam and then writing a verbose post like this. But then that's my challenge and my shortcoming.)

Abu Khaled
Nafs
Guest
« Reply #1 on: Sep 10, 2011 06:09 PM »


Should you find yourself unable to present your argument and retain your adab too, drop the argument and preserve your adab - surely that is more beneficial to you.



SubhanAllah brother, Thank you for sharing!

I think the verbose post was needed for those of us who might be blind and unaware Smiley

I also think that maybe this post should have its own thread and even be pinned... truely a reminder benefits the believer Smiley
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #2 on: Sep 10, 2011 06:39 PM »

walaikum salaam warahmatullah wabarakatuhu,

i was all excited to hear br abu khaled's thoughts on love  loveshower, but oh well.   gloomy

jazakAllah khair for that reminder bro. it's truly something every muslim who uses the internet in any way should take to heart. i will say in our defense our board is quite tame compared to some things out there Wink (ie facebook & some blogs where things get ugly as a rule & intense argumentation encouraged) but no doubt we fall into this all the time.

as an administrator it's always difficult to balance allowing ppl to discuss things and allowing them to argue with each other to the point where it gets ugly - (making things personal, adding insults or just plain arguing). but we also don't want to overly censor people's writings and ideas because they have a right to discussion and their differing viewpoints, even if we don't agree, but sometimes you must to benefit and protect the general audience.

i think i consider those crazy posts as like the man who urinated in the prophet(s)'s mosque or the man who pulled his beard. a kind of ignorance, but the real test is not his, but ours in how we handle it.

i have to tell you that 90% of our ummah is
- confused on or don't know certain islamic concepts
- like to argue their islamic view is right
- believe everyone else is wrong
- have some crazy ideas

(tell me i'm wrong Wink)

as someone whose main goal for the board is dawah i'm not going to squish or ban everything and everyone wrong. because that exists out there. what's the point then, there's no growth. no new ideas, no dawah.

so it's true the onus of responsibility is on each person, but it's also our responsibility to be able to answer and counter things. as long as it doesn't get out of control Smiley

i know it gets frustrating seeing ppl 'arguing' and in a better world, as better muslims we wouldn't have any arguing.

but i can't deny differing ideas exist in our ummah and that there are many, many muslims that think in certain ways. i personally don't like when ppl sanitize things so much so that it has no relation to reality. ie i attended a meeting yesterday for teaching weekend school at an inner-city mosque where the men and women teachers were in both sides of the musallah with an open door in between with a curtain. people were coming in and out, the kids were screaming, athan was going off, the women were having their own conversations and didn't hear anything of the mens. the men were bickering among themselves, and the brother organizing everything was so frustrated having to repeat everything to the women's side. we didn't hear a word and nothing got done on either side. it was just so. ridiculous. and has no resemblance to reality. i know those kids and they're dating each other, dealing with gangs, and other major major problems. i just found it so stupid. it's not like they don't see and interact with women everyday for dunya goals. i realize ppl want to be safe and have an ideal islamic environment but it's just not functional to our aims sometimes. so this is the same way i see the board... a microcosm of society, not perfect, not idealized, but what we are, inshaAllah growing together to be better and Allah knows best.

Abu Khaled
Bro
Newbie
*

Reputation Power: 11
Abu Khaled has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 37


« Reply #3 on: Sep 11, 2011 01:28 PM »

Bismillah Al-Rahman Al-Raheem

Assalam alaikum wa rahmatullah Sayyida Jannah.

If my post read as if I was seeking to stifle discussion, then I should clarify that that was absolutely not my intent. I fully believe it's important for us to have a space to discuss ideas, even controversial ideas. I just think we need to deliberate more carefully when we do and post more responsibly. You can tell when you read many posts that not enough forethought has gone into them, and they're written carelessly. We need to think about what it is we're trying to say; how best to convey it; about who our audience is, how much we don't know about them, and therefore to temper our words with the requisite care; and how our message is likely to be perceived. Yes, you can't control someone taking things the wrong way, but you can mitigate that by posting (more) responsibly.

We're all adults here, so whilst I appreciate your role as the Administrator, my words were really directed at us each taking ownership for our actions. If a thread gets to a point where you're intervening, then to me that suggests those individuals are incapable of policing themselves. Which obviously happens, that's just life too.

Now, you alluded to a couple of examples from the Prophetic era, including the instance of the bedouin who urinated in the mosque. I understand where you're coming from, but what I was addressing wasn't such solitary instances of some breach, rather, tendencies that members exhibit. Discernible patterns and trends, which reflect a certain, shall we say, posting pathology. So I'm not alluding to rare exceptions that contravene posting etiquette and general ethics around discussing and addressing one another. Rather, I mean basic qualities that govern our interaction, like courtesy, politeness, respect. Elements which embroider one's words and render an exchange more amenable. Indeed, even questionable topics can be rendered more palatable if conducted in a civil, mature manner.

Whilst I can't vouch for the 90% statistic, I agree with you about the four points you listed.

My purpose in posting the above, wasn't to advocate censorship, but self-censureship. To take oneself to task, rather than being taken to task by others, especially since the latter often chafes at the ego.

I've seen tenants of Madinat al-Muslimeen come and go, and it saddens me to witness the same contentious issues which have plagued the Muslim psyche for so long, continue to cause friction perennially.

I actually have no issue with discussing any topic with anyone. My only conditions are adab and a respect for the limitations of one's knowledge. In this regard let me share with you (all) a true story:

I was once discussing with - I think - an Ibadi (a sect that is common in Oman). Someone was observing the discussion. After a while this third-person remarked that I was two-faced. I asked what prompted them to say that, and they replied that they'd seen me discuss with others, and that they'd noticed me say different things to different people. I asked them whether it was possible that perhaps I was varying my approach based on the differing contexts of the people I was engaging with? That reason got accepted by this third-person (!). But the exchange between us continued, with them then saying that I thought I was better than everyone else! So, again, I asked where they got that notion from, about me? But they refused to answer. Which I felt was unfair, so I pressed further. Still they wouldn't provide me with an answer. So I explained that if they thought I was going to judge them then they were wrong, because I wouldn't, as I try not to do that. After a while of this back-and-forth, they privately said to me that someone like me could never understand someone like them! So I pushed back, and asked them to try me. They refused, saying that we lived in different worlds. I told them that they didn't know me and not to base their perception of me solely on a few discussions they'd observed. But this person was adamant that there was just no way I could ever understand what they were upon. By now, I had a sense - and I'm sure you do too - of what was about to come. They said that I would consider them extreme. So I said it's possible, but that that still didn't mean I'd judge them. Eventually, this sister revealed what she meant. And she was right, her "Islam" would send a chill down the spine of any right-thinking person. I write "Islam" in speech marks because what she espoused went against the very essence of why our Beloved Prophet - sallallahu alayhi wassalam - was sent, namely, as a mercy to mankind. If that basic realisation does not form the core of one's understanding, then something somewhere has gone very very wrong. And anyone who has been round the block knows, we have in our midst some seriously ominous characters, may Allah ta'ala keep us afar from such influence. (To be clear, I mean ominous characters in the world, not on this board!)

True to my word, I didn't judge her. And as we went our separate ways, she came to realise that it was possible to have a conversation about even the most contentious (read: obnoxious) of subjects with someone you stand at the complete opposite end of the spectrum to, if you're just able to do so dispassionately, and with some sense of decorum. Rasul'Allah - sallallahu alayhi wassalam - came for mankind, not just for like-minded peace-loving monotheists with exemplary characters.

So, contrary to how my preceding post may have made it seem, I don't believe in curtailing discussion, as the consequences of that can be dire, especially if the issue is one which is affecting, or could affect, someone's iman. I just think there's a time and a place for everything. Thankfully the above encounter wasn't in a space where others may have gotten exposed to such abhorrent views. (Incidentally, I didn't go looking for such an encounter, it just chanced upon me. I don't go around flexing in front of Muslims who hold extreme views; that would be  arrogance and conceit, wal iyadubillah.)

I mention this example to underscore my view that discussion should occur, and even the most repugnant of views should have somewhere where they can be aired. But that that somewhere should not be somewhere where minds that are easily susceptible to being corrupted, are present. To not provide any such space whatsoever though, is to force such views underground, which then makes it harder for the voices of rightly-guided learning, sense and wisdom, to tackle them.

I have observed threads on this board in the past which have expressed ideas that other members have found unpalatable - understandably so - and I've seen the difficult position it puts you, as an Administrator, in. Which is why, it needs to be reinforced that whilst people may have a right to discuss, there are parameters and protocols which Islam mandates them following. It is unfortunate that far too many of us - I'm talking in general, not just on this board - aren't aware of what these are, hence why a lot of these discussions end up being addressed by/to the wrong audiences.

Additionally, nor should we seek to be voyeurs when such extremism rears it's ugly head, thinking that we're too secure in our selves to get influenced, for that can lead to a complacency which could allow some element of deviance to take root, ma'adAllah [Allah forbid]. The same applies to any sort of heterodox idea. And these are days when theism itself is under siege from all sorts of philosophical propaganda which can cause the most ardent of believers to second-guess their aqida [belief].

Alhamdulillah, if this board is indeed a microcosm of the wider Muslim Ummah, then it reassures that, on the whole, Muslims are indeed capable of discussing sensibly, with adab. Which is why these kinds of reminders apply to a select few whose words have the effect - if not the underlying intention - of provoking and stirring.

Concerning the right to discuss, for me that is different from the right to hold a particular opinion/viewpoint. I consider the former is an important, if not necessary, factor in arriving at the latter. However, I'm not convinced that it's a level playing field for everyone having the right to hold an opinion on anything and everything they want to, by default. I think that depends on what the issue being discussed is. I believe sometimes such a right needs to be established and/or qualified, sometimes it even needs to be questioned. Some matters required advanced knowledge, so the entitlement to hold an opinion is the purview of those subject-matter experts - for example: theologians or jurists - who are capable of discussing at that level. To allow a non-specialist the right to an opinion in such issues is like validating a quack to operate on the surgeon's table. Because that non-specialist isn't positioned to be able to undertake the necessary due-diligence in arriving at an informed opinion (that shouldn't be confused with following a qualified scholarly position, in which case the opinion one holds is held by way of taqleed, not by way of following it, or establishing it, from first-principles). I don't doubt you agree with this. Yet, ironically, this analogy is all-too-often disregarded when it comes to Islamic opinion. The result of this is many lay Muslims functioning at a dumbed-down level. And the ongoing consequences of this are all around us everyday.

The following is an interesting article that throws up some considerations worth pondering, about the relationship between the right to have an opinion versus others' duty to entertain it:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/guest_contributors/article467194.ece

As far as this board goes, I agree with you, it is a beacon compared to many - I've seen those ones too - and I guess part of what motivated me to write was my jealousy in guarding the standard of this Madinat al-Muslimeen, so it doesn't go the way of those other online communities, where anything goes, including, unfortunately, any sense of Islamic propriety.

Abu Khaled
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Gender: Female
Posts: 7134


I heart the Madina


WWW
« Reply #4 on: Sep 11, 2011 05:22 PM »

walaikum salaam warahmatullah wabarakatuhu,

definitely no need to call me sayyida (i'm no lady! lol) although i believe we should be calling u sidi. jazakAllah khair for your second explanation along with the first. i agree with you on each of us taking responsibility and i hope we can do that inshaAllah. and hope the message reaches those who most need it and doesn't stop everyone else from posting even if their messages aren't 'perfect' islamically. may Allah allow us to benefit each other in the best way.


Jaihoon
Jaihoon
Bro
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 21
Jaihoon barely matters :(Jaihoon barely matters :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 362



WWW
« Reply #5 on: Sep 12, 2011 05:49 AM »

Twitter is a good tool to sharpen (read as enforce) our briefing our words.  Smiley

BrKhalid
Bro
Hero Member
*

Reputation Power: 27
BrKhalid barely matters :(BrKhalid barely matters :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 1352



« Reply #6 on: Sep 12, 2011 07:02 AM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

I really hope people take the time to read properly the posts in this thread (rather than just skim reading them) because there are so many good reminders/learning points.


I could have quoted any number of passages from this thread but have chosen the one below because it is equally applicable to our dealings with people in the outside world as well as online.


Quote
We need to think about what it is we're trying to say; how best to convey it; about who our audience is, how much we don't know about them, and therefore to temper our words with the requisite care; and how our message is likely to be perceived



PS Is the link to the Times article working? I only get an error message when I try to access it.


Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
Cinders
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 25
Cinders barely matters :(Cinders barely matters :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 397



« Reply #7 on: Sep 12, 2011 04:06 PM »

Assalamu Alaiykum,

I managed to open The Times article link. It's a great read. Smiley

Ma'Salam,

Cinders

وَلَسَوْفَ يُعْطِيكَ رَبُّكَ فَتَرْضَىٰ

And soon will your Lord give you so that you shall be well pleased.
Al Qur'an (93:5)
Abu Khaled
Bro
Newbie
*

Reputation Power: 11
Abu Khaled has no influence :(
Gender: Male
Posts: 37


« Reply #8 on: Sep 12, 2011 06:27 PM »

Wa-alaikum assalam wa rahmatullah Sidi Khalid.

Apologies, the link works, but if you're having difficulty, it is an article by Jamie Whyte entitled Sorry, but you are not entitled to your opinion. It was first published in The Times on 9th August 2004. Hopefully that should assist you in finding it.

Rationally speaking, his argument seems, ostensibly, quite compelling. See what you think?

Abu Khaled
UmmWafi
Sis
Full Member
*

Reputation Power: 12
UmmWafi has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 231



« Reply #9 on: Sep 14, 2011 06:09 AM »

Assalamu'alaikum wr wb

One of the many reasons I love this board is because of the tremendous opportunity for learning and Maasha'Allah, so much to learn from this post.

I posted in another thread my concerns regarding the nature of some posts, and the style or tendencies of some members, which I felt could bring about discord instead of unity. Reading the Time article is indeed very refreshing, and a much needed reminder.

Jazakallah for taking the time to share this brother, and may Allah SWT Bless us with hikmah and knowledge after reading it and reward you for your effort, ameen.

Wassalam
austmuslimah
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 10
austmuslimah has no influence :(
Gender: Female
Posts: 386



« Reply #10 on: Oct 27, 2011 04:12 PM »

I have finally, a bit late, perhaps, but nevertheless finally have read this whole thread carefully.
It is such a wonderful post. I do believe in the responsibilities we all have towards ourselves and each other, and that we do need to be very careful in what we say, how we say it, and what reactions/actions we are intending/expecting as a result of what we say.

I think this is great advice not only for posting but for everyday life. Endless argumentation is not beneficial for anyone involved.

This raises an issue I am having at the moment, but I will ask it in another thread.

Jazakallah
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
 
Jump to: