// Occupy Wall Street Protests!
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jannah
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« on: Oct 17, 2011 11:44 PM »


Has anyone attended one of these? My question is why did it take people so long to realize there are some major economic injustices in our system. We should have realized this in the 80s?? When a few people were making a huge amount of money in the face of others. Remember "trickle down economics?" blech. Guess it takes a recession(depression) for people (the middle class) to realize how unequal it actually is.

The movement definitely needs a leader don't u think? And some demands??

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« Reply #1 on: Oct 18, 2011 03:06 AM »

Haven't been to one, but our initial gathering here in Portland was around 10,000 people and then this past weekend, we had our city marathon and they were told to move from one park to another, so the marathon route wouldn't be disrupted. There were some arrests from what I saw of the headlines (we don't get the newspaper anymore).

I think that is true Sis J (I remember all that talk about trickle down economics) though I didn't really follow politics back in the 80s - was kinda young for that stuff (no offense, lol) but yeah, these kind of problems always have roots in earlier times and I'm sure something could have and should have been done then.

As for the demands, that is one thing that people have criticized the movement for - though they say it's almost everything, banks, corporations and of course, the more elegant "we are the 99%" who are suffering while that rich 1% is only getting richer. The movement has quite a broad-base, that transcends political parties and other groups that our society is made of.

On the other hand, a high school friend of mine posted a picture of the protest and on it, was highlighted all the corporate/big company items that people were carrying (phones, cameras, clothing, etc) implying it was kinda of being hypocritical . . .

Anyways, I heard on NPR last week, a guy saying that it was the American revolution and though it would take longer than 18 days or even a year, it would happen eventually.

Interesting and scary times we live in, don't you think?

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« Reply #2 on: Oct 19, 2011 04:47 AM »

Good article on the subject! & great pics by ppl!!




According to the author: Bismillahir-Rahmanir-Rahim. "Surely, Allah does not change the condition of a people unless they change themselves." Al-Qur'an 13:11 These graphics serve only as a reminder to myself and others that change begins from within and doesn't end there. Protest peacefully, get involved, change stuff but please don't forget your souls along the way.









More great pics from a friend: http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150872327565032.754060.601245031&type=1

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January 23, 2010
Op-Ed Columnist
They Still Don’t Get It
New York Times


How loud do the alarms have to get? There is an economic emergency in the country with millions upon millions of Americans riddled with fear and anxiety as they struggle with long-term joblessness, home foreclosures, personal bankruptcies and dwindling opportunities for themselves and their children.

The door is being slammed on the American dream and the politicians, including the president and his Democratic allies on Capitol Hill, seem not just helpless to deal with the crisis, but completely out of touch with the hardships that have fallen on so many.

While the nation was suffering through the worst economy since the Depression, the Democrats wasted a year squabbling like unruly toddlers over health insurance legislation. No one in his or her right mind could have believed that a workable, efficient, cost-effective system could come out of the monstrously ugly plan that finally emerged from the Senate after long months of shady alliances, disgraceful back-room deals, outlandish payoffs and abject capitulation to the insurance companies and giant pharmaceutical outfits.

The public interest? Forget about it.

With the power elite consumed with its incessant, discordant fiddling over health care, the economic plight of ordinary Americans, from the middle class to the very poor, got pathetically short shrift. And there is no evidence, even now, that leaders of either party fully grasp the depth of the crisis, which began long before the official start of the Great Recession in December 2007.

A new study from the Brookings Institution tells us that the largest and fastest-growing population of poor people in the U.S. is in the suburbs. You don’t hear about this from the politicians who are always so anxious to tell you, in between fund-raisers and photo-ops, what a great job they’re doing. From 2000 to 2008, the number of poor people in the U.S. grew by 5.2 million, reaching nearly 40 million. That represented an increase of 15.4 percent in the poor population, which was more than twice the increase in the population as a whole during that period.

The study does not include data from 2009, when so many millions of families were just hammered by the recession. So the reality is worse than the Brookings figures would indicate.

Job losses, stagnant or reduced wages over the past decade, and the loss of home equity when the housing bubble burst have combined to take a horrendous toll on families who thought they had done all the right things and were living the dream. A great deal of that bleeding is in the suburbs. The study, compiled by the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program, said, “Suburbs gained more than 2.5 million poor individuals, accounting for almost half of the total increase in the nation’s poor population since 2000.”

Democrats in search of clues as to why voters are unhappy may want to take a look at the report. In 2008, a startling 91.6 million people — more than 30 percent of the entire U.S. population — fell below 200 percent of the federal poverty line, which is a meager $21,834 for a family of four.

The question for Democrats is whether there is anything that will wake them up to their obligation to extend a powerful hand to ordinary Americans and help them take the government, including the Supreme Court, back from the big banks, the giant corporations and the myriad other predatory interests that put the value of a dollar high above the value of human beings.

The Democrats still hold the presidency and large majorities in both houses of Congress. The idea that they are not spending every waking hour trying to fix the broken economic system and put suffering Americans back to work is beyond pathetic. Deficit reduction is now the mantra in Washington, which means that new large-scale investments in infrastructure and other measures to ease the employment crisis and jump-start the most promising industries of the 21st century are highly unlikely.

What we’ll get instead is rhetoric. It’s cheap, so we can expect a lot of it.

Those at the bottom of the economic heap seem all but doomed in this environment. The Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University in Boston put the matter in stark perspective after analyzing the employment challenges facing young people in Chicago: “Labor market conditions for 16-19 and 20-24-year-olds in the city of Chicago in 2009 are the equivalent of a Great Depression-era, especially for young black men.”

The Republican Party has abandoned any serious approach to the nation’s biggest problems, economic or otherwise. It may be resurgent, but it’s not a serious party. That leaves only the Democrats, a party that once championed working people and the poor, but has long since lost its way.
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