// All-American Muslim reality show airs November 2011 - Reviews
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Blessedgrandma
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« on: Oct 24, 2011 11:09 PM »


Is anyone going to be checking this new show out?

Here is a link with a clip video

http://www.crescentpost.com/2011/10/video-tlcs-all-american-muslim-tv-show-premieres-in-november/

and

http://www.examiner.com/islam-in-santa-ana/muslim-american-reality-show-airs-november-2011
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« Reply #1 on: Oct 25, 2011 05:32 AM »

Salaams! Long time no see! I definitely will!  I even shared it on Google + where I am doing a bit of sharing/daw'ah with someone who is learning a lot (her words, not mine). She was happy that they were doing a program like this.

Let's see how it goes . .


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« Reply #2 on: Oct 31, 2011 11:46 PM »

Here's more about that show, trailer looks fab!

But... where's the desis?? Where's the african americans??? I know it's filmed in dearborn most populated Arab population in the US but I mean really??

==============

Muslim Reality Show, 'All-American Muslim,' To Premiere On TLC


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/21/muslim-reality-show-all-american-muslim_n_1024101.html#s426392&title=Sisters


What's life like as a Muslim-American?

A new eight-part series on TLC that premieres November 13 will try to answer that question by following the lives of five very different Muslim-American families. The show, "All-American Muslim", was filmed in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit that's known for it's large Arab-American population. It promises to go "inside the rarely seen world of American Muslims to uncover a unique community struggling to balance faith and nationality in a post 9/11 world," according to a press release.

Producers picked a diverse crowd to profile, from sisters who are polar opposites (one wears a headscarf and prays daily, the other has tattoos -- generally frowned upon in Islam -- and is married an Irish Catholic) to a high school football coach to newlyweds, in order to show people who "share the same religion, but lead very distinct lives that often times challenge the Muslim stereotype." The series will also address issues such as the post-9/11 life for Muslims and gender roles in Islam.

The show, which is rare for its focus on Muslims, has generated much buzz in the Muslim-American community as well as non-Muslims. Dawud Walid, the executive director of the Michigan chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, said he is looking forward to watching the series.

"It'll give us a taste of the lives of Muslim-Americans in both their aspirations and concerns. I think the show will be good and humanizing for the Muslim community of Dearborn," said Walid, who is friends with one of the cast members. Walid cautioned that, in terms of ethnic background, Muslims are "much more diverse than what Dearborn may show. Dearborn is an anomaly in the American Muslim landscape for its large Arab-American population and concentrated Muslim population."

The first episode of "All-American Muslim" airs at 10 p.m. Eastern time on TLC.

Here is a run-down of the show's characters, courtesy of TLC.

    Suehaila and Shadia: Suehaila wears a traditional headscarf and follows daily prayer rituals - while Shadia, her outspoken sister, is decorated with piercings and tattoos and recently married Jeff, an Irish Catholic who is converting to Islam.

    Nader and Nawal: Newlyweds expecting their first baby, Nader and Nawal are working to strike the right balance between their traditional Muslim roots and American culture.

    Fouad: As head coach of the Fordson High School football team, Fouad has pioneered a shift in his team's summer practice schedule by flipping to night workouts from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. since a majority of his team are Muslim and are fasting for Ramadan.

    Mike and Angela: Mike, a deputy chief sheriff, and his wife Angela, a consultant to a major auto manufacturer, are juggling their busy careers with raising their four children in a modern Muslim family.

    Nina: A strong, independent Muslim businesswoman, Nina's family runs the premier wedding and banquet hall in Dearborn — but against their advice, she is trying to venture off on her own to open a nightclub.

    Samira and Ali: Samira and her husband of seven years, Ali, struggle with fertility issues and are pursuing numerous options including conventional fertility techniques, dietary alternatives and Muslim supplication prayers. After years of unsuccessful attempts, Samira considers putting on the Hijab in order to be closer to God and hopefully be blessed with a child.

Check out a slideshow of some of the cast members below.
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« Reply #3 on: Nov 15, 2011 06:55 PM »

Salams,

Did anyone watch this??!! Don't have cable Sad so couldn't watch it, but heard the reactions from most friends who did watch it were like overwhelmingly negative...??

Here's one review:

--------------------

A new unscripted show about a handful of Muslim families from Dearborn premiered on TLC this weekend. Like many other American Muslims, I waited anxiously for the show “All American Muslim,” hoping it would put a more human face on our community through a mainstream media outlet. I watched patiently as one Arab family after another introduced themselves and tried to highlight how their multiple identities shaped their everyday lives. Just a few minutes into the show, my Facebook and Twitter newsfeeds started buzzing with commentary about the show. Many Muslims seemed to be disappointed that the show was not truly representative of them or what they knew about their fellow Muslims in America.

This kind of criticism should have been expected. Muslims across the globe are incredibly diverse, and American Muslims are no exception. The majority of American Muslims are not of Arab descent. Many of them do not live in 4,000 square foot homes. Some of them do not have belly dancers at their weddings receptions, but many of them do. It goes without saying that American Muslims are not a homogeneous group.

Even though a show cannot capture the complete diversity of American Muslims, many viewers would argue that it did not even come close to capturing the reality of Muslim communities in America. While the Fordson football team enjoys attending a high school where 95% of the students are Muslim, most American Muslims do not. More likely, their high school has only a handful of Muslim students. That handful would probably include an African American, a Pakistani American, and an American convert. The fact that these kinds of Muslims who represent a larger segment of American Muslims in the U.S. were nowhere to be found on the show is a legitimate criticism.

There is no denying that the name of the show is somewhat misleading. But if the goal was not to represent all Muslims in America, instead to just provide viewers with a birds-eye view of a town where Muslims happen to be the majority, then that goal was accomplished. The show could have been more aptly named, “All American Dearborn Arabs” as most of the families highlighted are authentic Dearbonites, many of whom happen to be Shiite and have a Lebanese heritage.

The “reality” is, “Jersey Shore” doesn’t represent Italians in NJ, “Sister Wives” doesn’t represent all Mormons, “Kate Plus Eight” doesn’t represent all families of multiples, so why would would we expect this show to represent all American Muslims? After all, it is NOT a documentary with journalistic standards a la PBS’ Frontline, for example. It is a made for television reality TV show. It’s a show that needs to bring in advertisers in order to keep on running. It’s a show that needs high ratings so it does not get cut.

We have to ask ourselves, to what extent can a 40-minute episode cut from hundreds of hours of raw footage represent reality? How “real” can these families be when they have camera crews stationed in their living rooms all day? We have to take these facts into account before trying to set such high standards for everyday entertainment television. These families had the courage and openness to allow TLC to come into their homes, to film their strengths and vulnerabilities, a challenge that many Muslim American families would shy away from.

“All American Muslim” is not supposed to represent you or your community. It represents the individuals and families that are featured on it, no more, no less. How much “reality” is in this “reality TV show”? A lot, if you ask me: the reality of being parents of a newborn child facing sleepless nights, the reality of being a small business owner (yes, a club is a business) and the reality of coaching a bunch of rowdy teenage football players. These are challenges and issues that Americans face everyday, and that’s what non-Muslims will hopefully glean from this. Moreover, this show is a reality check for our own Muslim American communities. Let’s stop assuming that Muslims do not drink, have tattoos, or own clubs. If you were somehow shocked by the scenes on this episode, it simply indicates your lack of interaction with a representative sample of American Muslims.

Not only do the featured families deal with everyday run-of-the-mill challenges that Joe Shmoe faces, they also have to worry about hate crimes, discrimination at work, and bullying at school. The previews of the next few episodes seem to indicate more depth as the show dives deeper into the lives of these five families. I hope people will continue to tune in, while pushing aside their own judgements of what an “American Muslim” is or should be.
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« Reply #4 on: Nov 16, 2011 05:36 PM »

Salaams

I watched it . .

While I thought, going into it, it would be a chance for non-Muslims to see a positive side of us, a simulates for education and understanding. after some short exchanges on Twitter as I watched, I did realize that it could also be a step backwards for us and a source of confusion for those who are ignorant. As you already know, it only showed a narrow segment of our community here - Arab and Shia. I think the one positive and "cool" segment was when they featured the coach from the documentary Fordson, which probably showed a more clear cut side of the Faith.  Also, I think the conversion story was also typical or increasingly common issue, so I think that was also a good thing to show.

Yet, the central characters seemed to be portrayed or wanted to portray that they were American and more Arab, as again, the culture seemed the stronger presence. A mosque was never shown, no one was shown praying, etc. Also, from the trailer, you probably saw that one woman (the one getting married, whose fiancee was considering conversion) was not so modest in dress, not even by moderate standards (i.e. non-hijab).

One lady that I highly respect, Linda Sarsour, was saying several times on Twitter that we had to understand that these families were not representing ALL MUSLIMS, but just a small portion. I understand that given that it was set in Dearborn, so we can't expect to see Black Muslims, South Asian Muslims and other sectors of our community. So people were saying it should be called All Arab American, or something like that. For example, belly-dancing was shown, which I think we know isn't typical of Muslim gatherings, but rather Arab gatherings.

One reason that I changed my mind was that after having a short Twitter exchange with YouTube Bro BonsaiSky, who makes nice videos and he was saying what I was relating above, that it could cause us to take a step back, confuse those who are already ignorant and I saw that this could indeed be true. He was saying of course, that no one is perfect but it doesn't mean we need to show certain sides of our faith. I am not denying that we have those who are less practicing, etc (not like I'm a great example myself!) but since these families are going to be followed, I would hope in the future, the other members of our larger community will be shown in a public forum, whether a TV show or some other medium - and I think a reality show isn't the best way to portray any group for that matter.

Another Twitter associate was saying she liked how it showed "this side" of the community and that the conservatives, as she put it, had their voice being heard, so it was nice to see the other side of the story as well.

I mean, it is a big step to have Muslim on screen that are the central character and not playing terrorists or some negative role, but at the same time, it carries a responsibility with it, so that is nothing to be taken lightly and in fact, is a heavy weight in these times.

Anyways, those are my thoughts, sorry that it wasn't organized. I don't think I'll be watching the remaining parts.
I saw yesterday that there were 1.7 million viewers for that first episode.

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« Reply #5 on: Nov 17, 2011 04:24 AM »

Another view of the show and I think reflects what I think those who thought it was negative were truly trying to say. Today, I've seen some people saying that those of us who didn't like it, that "when did you become the perfect Muslim" and while I think we all know we are not near from perfect, it is just that it didn't show a side we are necessariloy proud of, but again, reality is reality and I think this article states in a more relevant and clearer manner than I could ever have put it.


All-American Muslim: An Outrageous but Sad Reality

REASON FOR OUTRAGE OR INTROSPECTION?

Dearborn, Michigan used to be famous for being the auto headquarters of the world. These days, it's better known for producing the extreme poise and class of Team Rima Fakih and All American Circus...we mean, Muslim. Why anyone would expect reality television to explain Islam to Americans in a factual and clear way is beyond our comprehension. Unfortunately, those who are outraged by the show among the Muslim community need some perspective: it's a show about Muslims, not Islam.

All-American Muslim is not a form of propagation of Islamic beliefs due to the kindness of the hearts of television executives. In fact, TLC is rivaled by only MTV when it comes to documenting subgroups of American culture that are entertaining (read: filled with drama) and different. Would anyone watch a show depicting five devout and pious Muslim families? Absolutely not! If the show offends you as a Muslim, then you've got bigger problems with reality than reality TV could ever show you. All-American Muslim doesn't even begin to highlight the problems our community faces. There is merit in condemning the idea it represents Islam, but it certainly provides a snapshot into some of the growing epidemics facing our community.

Event planner Nina Bazzy wants to open a night-club. Considering the way she is dressed and carries herself, was anyone expecting her to open a mosque? As terrible as her portrayal of an American Muslim is, we shouldn't worry about that image. We should be more concerned about the countless number of our youth who partake in haram activities at venues such as night-clubs.

Another slightly ironic situation arises when many in the Muslim community voice outrage at the wedding that takes place on the first episode of All-American Muslim. Well, I'm outraged that you're outraged. Every day in Dearborn, a gender mixed wedding takes place, where women, even those in Hijab, wear formfitting dresses and makeup and dance with men. In fact, Dearborn weddings have constantly been the topic of discussion by scholars who have been offended and frustrated with this community's failure to take a stand against mixed weddings with music, dancing, and immodest dress. Why is it that now this is a problem, and previously no one said anything? Un-Islamic weddings have become such a norm in Dearborn that otherwise practicing individuals find themselves pressured into attending or even incorporating strictly un-Islamic practices into their own weddings.

Perhaps it would be against our interest to realize that many Muslims fall short of the great status God has given us as followers of Islam. The worst part of it all? TLC didn't make anyone act in a way that was untrue to them. The families shown on All-American Muslim are part of our community too, and they are far from the only ones who may disregard Islamic laws. Of course, not all the characters on the show behave in this way. But at the end of the day, TLC has its own agenda to promote. Watering down Islam and making it kosher serves the interest of many parties and powers. However, our interest doesn't lie in fighting a reality show, but rather, making sure that our daughters embrace dignity over the disgrace of immodesty, and making sure our community seeks to reach a more profound level in our understanding and practice of Islam.

In a few years, TLC will find itself a new community to document and edit to its liking, but in a few years, how many more Nina Bazzys will our community have produced?


http://www.islamicinsights.com/news/opinion/all-american-muslim-an-outrageous-but-sad-reality.html

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« Reply #6 on: Nov 17, 2011 05:04 AM »

Salams,

OK Just watched this!!! and........ I liked it!!!  Tongue

You know I think that last review really does give some perspective. The show is about a certain group of Muslim Lebanese families in Dearborn, Michigan and their lives. I think that's how we should look at it. Not as a documentary about Islam!!

In any case, nothing they actually said was wrong Islamic wise, those who don't practice as much admit it openly, and they even translated all the Arabic perfectly! This is going against like everyone, but I personally liked the show!! Smiley I would watch it and find it interesting if I was a non-Muslim too and give non-Muslims some credit they know there are more practicing Muslims and less practicing Muslims and it's highlighted quite a bit in the show. I think they actually made that one of the points of drama of the show; showing how all the families differ in their religiosity and stuff. And it's not like these people don't exist. We all know these archetypes: Muslims in name only, Muslims who have faith but don't practice, Muslims that practice, ppl that convert only for marriage etc. They all exist in our community and we know them, and if someone doesn't they're ignoring quite a large bit of of our population!! (And the show seems to be showing all these types.)

I actually think they did some Dawah too by showing certain things ie prayer, why we cover, how someone converts, that hijabis try to look nice too, that we all don't have heavy accents, how we get married, that we grew up here, that women work, the husbands helping the wives, what we do in ramadan, how we don't drink etc.

Before watching it I really felt one of the criticisms was that they didn't include Muslims of other ethnicities like South Asians, African Americans, Converts (practicing one's), but I think maybe they felt the contrast would be so great, it would be a completely different show. We know how much culturally Muslims differ, but in this show because everyone is Lebanese the main difference is their lives and practice.

Anyways, I didn't think it was as bad as ppl were lamenting about and I'd definitely watch the rest of the season!! Just my opinion Wink
 

PS - The funniest part was when the bride was talking about her unmarried sister and was like my sister's not that old but in Arab years she's like 65!! lol ohhhh how I feel ya sistah Smiley Let's hope she gets some proposals out of this! She looked gorgeous at the wedding!
 

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« Reply #7 on: Nov 17, 2011 09:06 AM »

I understand your view and it's at least to have us on as a focus of a program that isn't negative, but again, I feel weary of "reality" TV . . .but yes, I do realize we have people across the board in terms of religiousity and practice, that's fine.

Again, maybe in future shows or projects, we can show other sides of our community, even though I'm guessing it would be very boring . . not sure how this would work . . i think that the real communication and understanding will happen at the community level, with people getting together, rather than watching a scripted show, etc.

Maybe if I was less stressed out with this exam stuff, I would watch it, but I just wanted to see the first one at least.

But yeah, as you point out, there were some fun, light-hearted moments that I think it was good for "outsiders" to see.  Smiley

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« Reply #8 on: Nov 18, 2011 06:21 AM »

From the very cool Wajahat Ali (Also, I saw that Sh. Webb is going to talk about Penn State and this show during his khutbah tomorrow) - BABA

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifamerica/2011/nov/17/reality-all-american-muslim-reality-tv


The reality of the 'All-American Muslim' reality TV show


The series about five American Muslim families can't represent all of us – any more than Jersey Shore does Italian Americans

For those constantly fretting about the inability of Muslims to integrate or assimilate into western culture, fret no more!

American Muslims finally have their own reality TV show – the Learning Channel's "All-American Muslim" – focusing on the lives of five American Muslim families in Dearborn, Michigan, who are predominantly Lebanese and Shiite. The show's premiere gave TLC huge ratings and made the show No 2 in its time period. Mainstream critics have embraced the show citing it as "intimate and informative" and a "deeply intriguing, uncharacteristically thoughtful reality series".

Reality TV is the current zeitgeist of popular culture. Unlike the euro, it is the predominant cultural currency, whose value is skyrocketing. America is on a first-name basis with their cultural ambassadors: Snookie, Kate Plus 8, Paris, Ozzie and Kim. Could Shadia, the show's tattooed, country music-loving Lebanese American Muslim, with an Irish Catholic boyfriend, belong in the pantheon?

"[All American Muslim] is just a natural fit for us …We're always all about telling compelling stories about real families," says TLC's Alan Orstein, VP of production and development. But some have already taken deep offense to this "reality" show, which claims to portray the "real" lives of Muslims.

Within days of the show's premiere, the fear-mongering Islamphobia network complained the show is actually propaganda that promotes a "submission to Islam through the hijab" and "tries to make a religion which believes in world domination and the inferiority of women, seem normal". The author of this article, posted on David Horowitz's inflammatory Front Page Magazine, also goes on to compare Muslims to Nazis: "Muslims are like us [Americans]; that's the problem. The Nazis were like us too. So were the Communists."

Apparently, TLC is a stealth-jihadist outfit with grand schemes to brainwash American women into burning their swimsuits and tank tops and replacing them with modest, traditional Islamic clothing as a gradual means towards converting them to Islam. I'll be waiting for their next reality TV show: "UV Radiation Fighters."

Pamela Geller, founder of the shrill Atlas Shrugs blog and co-founder with blogger Robert Spencer of Stop Islamization of America, is convinced the show "is an attempt to manipulate Americans into ignoring the threat of jihad". Who would have thought a reality TV show could have so much brainwashing potential? Instead of mounting violent campaigns, all our enemies needed to secure victory was to produce "The Real Housewives of al-Qaida."

If Geller, Spencer and Horowitz were producing their version of American Muslim reality, the episodes would focus on the families' radical stealth jihadist plots. Through eight episodes, they would attempt to turn McDonald's golden arches into minarets, transform California to Caliph-ornia, place a burqa over the Statute of Liberty, creep sharia into the Denny's breakfast menu, and spike the elementary school eggnog with sumac and lentils.

A "real Muslim" according to many is this anti-American, extremist, violent stereotype – an image often plastered over news headlines. This myth is unsurprising, perhaps, considering 60% of Americans say they don't know a Muslim. Furthermore, the No 1 source of information about Muslims for American is the media, and often, the images are negative. Yet, according to all the studies and evidence, the reality of American Muslims is that they are moderate, loyal to America, optimistic about America's future, in tune with American values, well-educated, and are the nation's most diverse religious community.

That being said, nearly half of American Muslims say they have faced discrimination. The FBI just announced anti-Muslim hate crimes have risen 50%. And a Republican presidential candidate with an alleged proclivity towards sexual harassment and unintentionally hilarious campaign videos has claimed a majority of Muslim Americans are extremists.

The portrayal of Muslims living their daily lives is not only a welcome relief from the usual tawdry caricatures of Muslims as terrorists, extremists and taxi cab drivers, but it also helps defuse the deep-seated fears and bias that unfairly lumps 1.5 billion members of a faith in with the perverse criminal actions of a few.

However, even American Muslims have voiced their criticisms with the show. The Twitterverse exploded (figuratively) with comments reflecting the diversity of the American Muslim opinions. Some said the show misleads with the title "All-American Muslim", since it solely focuses on one niche religious, ethnic community (Lebanese Shiite in Dearborn, Michigan) and leaves out the majority of American Muslim communities, such as African Americans, South Asians, Sunnis and those from the low-income middle class. Others, apparently, want their TV Muslims to be avatars of religious and moral perfection and complained about some of the characters' portrayal of Islam. (Shadia is a tattooed, partying rebel dating a white, Irish Catholic man who converts to Islam in order to marry her. Nina is a busty, dyed-blonde, opinionated business woman, with a penchant for tight dresses and ambitions to open her own club.)

Which only goes to show that representing Muslims and Islam in the mainstream is an utterly thankless job. The term "Muslim" is itself so politically and culturally loaded that it is impossible to escape controversy, no matter how trivial or manufactured. Since Muslims are a marginalised community with very few positive mainstream representations, audiences unfairly project onto these five families all their own insecurities, assumptions, fears, political ideologies, religious opinions, personal stories and other gratuitous baggage. So, if the characters do not 100% reflect the reality of certain audience members, then they cease to be authentic or valid.

The five families on "All-American Muslim" should not be asked to represent all Muslims, Arabs or Americans. Does Jersey Shore represent all Italians? If so, you can hear Frank Sinatra crooning in his grave. Similarly, Kim Kardashian does not represent all narcissistic, wannabe socialites with a fetish for athletes. (That may be an insult to fetishes.)

The best way to view "All-American Muslim" is simply a show about five families doing their best to be themselves. They're just people, who happen to identify as Muslim, Arab and American. Their story isn't the wild-eyed, paranoid fantasy that is colored by the hate-filled minds of the Islamophobia network. It isn't the terrorist stereotype familiar to most American audiences thanks to mainstream Hollywood depictions and sensationalised news headlines. And it won't be the story of this nation's 3-4 million American Muslims (population estimates vary from 1.3 to 7 million), who will hopefully find more avenues to tell their unique narratives through mainstream outlets.

In the meantime, we should exhale and simply let this reality TV show succeed or fail on the merits of its ability to entertain, instead of obsessing about how "realistic" its depiction of Islam and Muslims is. If the ratings decline, TLC can always create a new talent show featuring the cast members of "The Real Housewives" and "All-American Muslim", judged by Kim Kardashian and Ozzy Osbourne, whose winner gets an opportunity to join all the previous winners from "Dancing with the Stars" in a new "Survivor" series about who lives beyond the 15th minute of fame.

That's a reality show whose authenticity cannot be denied.

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
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« Reply #9 on: Nov 18, 2011 01:26 PM »

Quote
Instead of mounting violent campaigns, all our enemies needed to secure victory was to produce "The Real Housewives of al-Qaida."

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« Reply #10 on: Nov 18, 2011 05:55 PM »

haha, that was a funny line. Actually just read it, as I hadn't before posting (hope that isn't against the rules!)

I think he makes a good point in terms of the expectations of the show and I think we can't necessarity put those high expectations that I certainly wanted or desired, given the name of the show.

Just so funny how these right-wingers are so paranoid. Why not learn something about Islam first before they spew their hate? At least be an informed hater than an ignorant one that just looks plain stupid and then spread your hate to those who are even more ignorant themselves.

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« Reply #11 on: Nov 18, 2011 05:58 PM »

Another view, this time from Aman Ali of 30 Mosques in 30 Days fame - BABA



My Take: 'All-American Muslim' doesn't speak for this Muslim

Editor’s note: Aman Ali is a New York-based writer, stand-up comedian and the co-creator of 30 Mosques in 30 Days, a Ramadan road trip across America.

By Aman Ali, Special to CNN

Anytime I hear about a TV show coming out that features Muslims, my initial reaction is almost always “Oh man, please don’t suck. Please don’t suck.”

Unfortunately with TLC’s new reality show, it does.

“All-American Muslim” is the network’s new series about a group of Muslim families living in the Arab-rich city of Dearborn, Michigan.

Brilliant! What better way to show the mainstream public an insight into how multicultural and intellectually diverse Islam’s followers are… with a show focusing on just Arabs (20 percent of the world’s Muslim population) who follow the Shia sect of Islam (about 10 percent of the world’s Muslim population).

The show, which premiered over the weekend, presents itself as a glimpse into the American Muslim community but ignores an overwhelming majority of the cultures that comprise it. South Asians like my parents, who came from India, make up one of the largest group of Muslim immigrants in the United States.

That doesn’t bother me as much as the fact that the show makes no reference to African-American Muslims, another huge American Muslim group. Many of the black slaves that built the foundation of this country with blood, sweat and tears were Muslim.

And Malcolm X, Muhammad Ali, Dave Chappelle and Lupe Fiasco are all American Muslims, too. Hell, Detroit is right next to Dearborn. All the producers had to do was turn around and they’d find one of the most active African-American Muslim communities in the country.

The first episode said Dearborn has the largest population of Arabs in the United States – a statistic I’ve heard echoed time and time again. But I just checked the latest statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau and learned that the Arab population in New York City is more than twice that of Dearborn. Seems like TLC can’t even stereotype correctly.

A bigger issue I have is with the show’s characters.

One woman is a boozing, tattoo-laden rebel child who wants to marry an Irish Catholic. Another is a scantily-clad and confrontational business shark who dreams about opening her own nightclub.

While I appreciate that the show is implying that Muslim women are more than just devout, headscarf-wearing housewives locked in the kitchen all day, why do the “liberal” characters represent an opposite extreme? Most Muslim women in this country don’t fit neatly into the ultra-conservative or ultra-liberal categories. They’re in the gray area.

The men on the show, meanwhile, are just plain boring. There’s a Muslim cop who insecurely reiterates his patriotism every 10 seconds. I’m surprised he doesn’t sleep in American flag pajamas and that his cell phone ringtone isn’t a Toby Keith song.

My favorite part of the show’s first episode is the spotlight it throws on the predominantly Muslim football team at Dearborn Fordson High School. “All-American Muslim” spends significant time on the team but leaves out that they’re 6-5 this season and scoreless in the first game losing by more than 40 points.

While its great that faith means so much to these players, it would be nice if scoring touchdowns meant just as much to them, too.

I recently co-created a project with called 30 Mosques in 30 Days, in which my friend Bassam Tariq and I drove over 25,000 miles to each of the 50 states to tell unfiltered stories about Muslim Americans. “All-American Muslim” doesn’t speak for them, nor does it speak for me.

These stories bear little resemblance to the narratives of my own or the ones I’ve stumbled across in my community.

You want to do an authentic story about an American Muslim? Do a story about a scrawny 20-something guy who awkwardly spends months mustering up the courage to tell a girl he likes her. Or girls that blabber about another girl they see talking to a guy for more than 11 seconds.

Best yet, passive aggressive parents that try to segue anything that comes out of your mouth into a lecture about why you should have been a doctor or why you’re going to die alone if you don’t get married by age 23.

That’s Muslim America. They’re stories of people no different than any one else in this country.

TLC has disappointed me. But maybe that’s not saying much, considering the network airs two shows exploiting the lives of little people and one called “I Didn’t Know I Was Pregnant.”

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
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« Reply #12 on: Nov 19, 2011 05:44 AM »

wsalam,

All these viewpoints are so interesting!! I think every person would create their "All American Muslim" story differently don't u?? I'd make mine all General Hospital like.... and call it THE MOSQUE and all these ppl would be around with their different dramas -- families, teenagers, singles, immigrants, converts and it would all tie into the Mosque somehow... AND I'D Set it in the YEAR 2143 after humans have destroyed the Earth and they go back in time to create a new world all Terra Nova style... whatdy'a think would ppl watch it??  Grin
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« Reply #13 on: Nov 19, 2011 08:36 PM »

wsalam,

All these viewpoints are so interesting!! I think every person would create their "All American Muslim" story differently don't u??


As salaamu alaikum --

"All American Muslim" is definitely a step in the right direction.  I look forward to seeing Muslims on TV in the US and having it not seem odd. Usually, if there are any Muslims on a show at all, they are either extremists, honor killers, or hate-filled automatons, or they are positioned in the show with a "walk on" part and their only function is to insist that not ALL Muslims are extremists.  The various Law & Order series are particularly guilty of that.

I really like the rare occasions where you see someone obviously Muslim (hijab, beard/kufi, etc.) on TV as an extra and they are doing some normal: shopping, commuting to work, walking down the hallway at school. And nobody is staring at them or acting weird.

I'm African American and I remember a long time ago when you seldom saw a black person on American TV.  If you did, they were a servant, spoke poor English and weren't very smart.  When "Julia" premiered in the late 1960's, lots of people complained that most black women did not look, act or live like the character Diahann Carroll played.  

But so what?  She broke a barrier, playing a professional black woman (a nurse).  Nowadays it's not unusual at all to see a black nurse, doctor, cop, lawyer, etc on television.  Their characters are fully drawn; no "walk on" actor is required to appear at the scene and say "See, we're not ALL Bloods and Crips".

When a show entitled "All American Muslim" sounds as odd as a show entitled "All American Negro" would, that's when we will know that Muslims are accepted as legitimate citizens and human beings.  
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« Reply #14 on: Nov 20, 2011 08:11 AM »

I was really looking forward to this show as I have been so diappointed Little Mosque isn't on anymore.
After looking forward to it for weeks I have to admit I was both thrilled and disappointed.
Thrilled to be watching a show with other Muslims as I am not around other Muslims in real life,
thrilled that some were shown to be less than perfect light but still proud to be Muslim.
The younger woman with the tattoo's and such, maybe not a perfect Muslim but from her
preparing for her marriage came back to her religion and it's traditions, requirements and expectations.
You see when we only look at near perfect pious Muslims it only reminds me of my short comings.
I can relate to much less than perfect other Muslims because I am to very far from perfect.
Disappointed because I would like to see this not only for Muslims but to educate non Muslims.
However we all need to keep in mind it was just the first show. Hopefully it will get better as it continues.
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« Reply #15 on: Nov 21, 2011 05:33 AM »

Show discussing Reality-tv and humor for Muslims, Dearborn and the TLC show, with  Azhar Usman and a sister on the show.

Funny that he describes the show as Kardashians for Muslims lolll

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« Reply #16 on: Nov 21, 2011 06:02 AM »

Darn you beat me to it Sis J   Tongue (You know, me being the post-Al Jazeera videos-for-every-news-event person- I had posted this for my Google + audience last week though

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« Reply #17 on: Nov 21, 2011 08:16 AM »

as salaamu alaykum,

I haven't seen the show, but by default anything that Geller, Spencer and Horowitz dislike gets two thumbs up from me  twothumbsup.  I really thought that they would just go away once they had actual blood on their hands (via Anders Breivik the guy from Norway that killed lots of people after being influenced by their skewed views of reality) but I guess the pay for Islamophobes these days must be phenomenal.  (How much do souls go for these days anyway?)

In any case, I appreciate a lot of what pearl said.  I think its good to see Muslims - any Muslims really - in the media that are not bombing someone or acting sinister.  Being put in the spotlight - even if its not a completely accurate or just portrayal of the real diversity of our community - is a step in the right direction.  

Allah knows best
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« Reply #18 on: Nov 22, 2011 02:24 AM »

Quote
anything that Geller, Spencer and Horowitz dislike gets two thumbs up from me

True that!!! Apparently they're going nuts foaming at the mouth calling it "Jihad-tv" and says it's brainwashing Americans lol!!  hi

The one sister Suhyala in the above interview is pretty articulate and awesome, hope they show more of her. Honestly for ppl to see a Hijabi woman on TV open her mouth and talk in normal English saying she's as American as everyone else and this is her home, is a Revolution. No doubt about it!!


According to Hollywood reporter the show is a HUGE HiT!! Can't wait to watch Episode 2. A lot of ppl critical of the first one said the next one was muchhh better! Just wish they had the episodes on TLC's website.


Quote
'All-American Muslim' Opens Solid for TLC
The series opener drew 1.7 million viewers at 10 p.m. on Sunday night.

America couldn't get enough of TLC's All-American Muslim.

Sunday night's series opener for the network's latest docu-series scored, averaging 1.7 million viewers at 10 p.m. Among ad-supported cable nets, All-American Muslim drew a 1.5 rating in women 18-49 and a 1.8 rating in women 18-34, making it the No. 2 show in its time period.

The episode, "How to Marry a Muslim," boosted TLC to post its highest Sunday primetime performance in more than a year in women 18-34.

Last night's premiere saw Jeff, an Irish Catholic who faces a tough choice when he decides to marry his Muslim girlfriend Shadia. Event planner Nina, with plans to open a nightclub in the area, was the talk of her town.

All-American Muslim airs Sundays at 10 p.m.


Here's one review from the hollywoodreporter website. I honestly can't believe how positive it is and I think it's amazing how much the person watching it actually learned about Islam down to the shahadah and what Hijab is!!


================

All-American Muslim: TV Review
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/all-american-muslim-tv-review-258770

The Bottom Line

An intimate and informative look at the Islamic community in Dearborn, Michigan, All-American Muslim is a heartfelt story of immigration and assimilation that is as American as apple pie.
Airdate:

Sunday, Nov. 13, 10 PM EDT, 9 PM PT
Executive Producers:  

Nick Emmerson, Dan Peirson, Jennifer O’Connell  
Executive produced by Nick Emmerson, Dan Peirson and Jennifer O'Connell, the show offers an authentic and moving portrait of a little-known sector of American life.

What does it mean to be an American? Since the founding of our country, that question has been the subject of countless novels, films, plays and poems. Reality television has also recently flirted with the intersection of cultural and national identity on shows like Mob Wives, Russian Dolls, Bordertown: Laredo, chronicling the lives of Americans whose traditions were shaped elsewhere.


As its title suggests, TLC’s engaging new series All-American Muslim concerns what some in the United States may view as a controversial topic: the growing number of Muslims in American cities and towns. Set in Dearborn, Michigan, a place with the largest concentration of Muslims outside of the Middle East, the show follows several members of the Lebanese community as they pray, eat, get married, play football, run businesses, and generally assimilate into life in the United States while continuing to practice Islam.

“Another Muslim might say I’m not Muslim enough,” declares Nina Bazzy, a platinum blonde with a penchant for form fitting clothing. “I don’t think I need to express my religion through the way I dress. So I’m not wearing a hajib and I’m a strong woman so people don’t really know how to take me.”

Bucking the notion of what it is to be a model Muslim female, Bazzy’s dream is to open a nightclub in Dearborn. And in true American style, the resistance she faces from more conservative members of the community only makes her more determined.

“I definitely get a little bit excited when people tell me I can’t do something, so it does make me a little bit more motivated to do it,” Bazzy boasts.

Another compelling story line in the premiere episode involves Shadia Amen, a second-generation “rebel of the family” who is engaged to Jeff McDermott, an Irish Catholic guy she met in the bar where she worked.

In order to marry Shadia, Jeff agrees to convert to Islam, a fact that gives his mother a few moments of pause.

“It’s that continuity of tradition that has been pretty much in our family, and this is a big break, a big break.” Mary McDermott, Jeff’s mom, tells her son.

As the wedding approaches, it’s fascinating to learn how few hoops there are to jump through for those looking to become Muslim. The ceremony, which is held at the middle class home of Shadia’s parents, consists of Jeff repeating two simple lines: I bear witness that there is no God but Allah. I bear witness that Mohammed is his messenger.

“It’s not like it is when I was baptized, confirmed,” Jeff quips afterward. “I am surprised how easy it is to convert to Islam.”

Though the bulk of the show is spent following its protagonists around Dearborn, interspersed group discussions on the varying degrees to which each cast member follows Islam prove equally entertaining and enlightening.

“I’m just like every other girl,” says Nawal Aoude, a pregnant newlywed who wears the traditional hijab head scarf.  “I like to do my hair. I like to condition it. I like to do hot oil treatments. I like to highlight it. You know I do all of that stuff, too, you just don’t see it.”

To be sure, Executive Producers Nick Emmerson (Basketball Wives), Dan Peirson (World’s Strictest Parents), Jennifer O’Connell (The Real Housewives of New York City) have focused on a very moderate sector of Dearborn’s Lebanese community, who, for starters, don’t mind appearing together on a reality show. There’s no doubt that a different version Muslim reality exists within the town’s more traditional Palestinian or Yemeni sections, but the portrait delivered here is undeniably authentic and moving.

Unlike so many concocted reality shows, whose conflicts seem dreamed up by producers up to stir ratings, All-American Muslim needs no tricks or gimmicks. You come away from the show having broadened your understanding for a sector of, yes, American life that you may not have had much contact with before. By the standards of the genre, that’s about as good as it gets.
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« Reply #19 on: Nov 23, 2011 09:50 AM »

Salam alaikum

Wow...

we get TLC here, wonder when they're going to air this, if ever...

I had always heard of Dearborn Michigan as *the* city for Muslims in the US.  They have a huge community, Shia and Sunni, and I'm sure it's good for the community to get positive exposure? 

It's so strange for me that you guys are excited to see a hijabi on TV (don't take this the wrong way, I find it fascinating that this is the case)...just shows you that being Muslim and visible is just different in the US/Europe/elsewhere.  Alhamdulillah, here it is not strange at all.  Even the smallest towns have visible Muslims and hijabis are on TV all the time.  People might get a bit startled to see a niqabi in real life, but Muslims in general and hijabis are part of this society, albeit a very non-Muslim semi-westernised mixed conglomerate of ethnicites.

a sheikh who visited us from Atlanta spoke about how Islam is viewed in the US.  So yes, I am also now excited that there are articulate muslims on mainstream TV there...to show that we are normal, and not at all alien!

Enjoy watching the show, I will let you know if it reaches the southern tip of Africa sometime this century!

salam
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« Reply #20 on: Nov 27, 2011 04:34 AM »

Salam,

Watched the second episode! Liked it a lot....they're definitely showing a lot more about Islam and religious aspects of it...really interesting people they picked too!! I think all the people on it are pretty amazing, and loved the section where they went to get their "hijabs styled". and SO GLAD the whole meeting with the Imams was totally in English! That was very cool. Jeff breaking his fast, uncool. Very disturbing to watch that, but I liked their handling of it and how they showed that it was his choice and that obviously if he didn't have any belief in Islam there was no point...

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« Reply #21 on: Nov 28, 2011 06:40 AM »

Watched the 3rd episode tonight. I liked it much more. Again, love the Fordson coach - he was invited to the White House Iftar this year, so that was cool (don't mean to give it away). Overall, I think the show got better, though I still don't like the whole sister-opening-a club thing, she could do something more worthwhile....while I was initially disappointed, I think and hope that it will do more good than harm. It is true that we have a myriad of personalities and levels of practice in the community and while it may not be flattering form within, it does at least show that we have people at different levels and it humanizes Muslims to those who think we are aliens or "the other."

Of course, it does serve as entertainment, as that is what reality TV is by definition...

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« Reply #22 on: Nov 29, 2011 04:43 PM »

This guy is a total stud - love what he has written in the past about our struggle here in America (I'm in touch with him on Twitter) and this piece of his on the show is getting lots of positive feedback - he even got a tweet from Shadia, (the girl who married Jeff, the convert). - BABA

My Take: Defending TLC’s ‘All-American Muslim’ against Muslim complaints

Editor's Note: Khurram Dara is the author of "The Crescent Directive: An essay on improving the image of Islam in America," coming this winter (Tensile). He tweets @KhurramDara.

By Khurram Dara, Special to CNN.com


For the last decade, Islam has been under a lot of scrutiny, and understandably so. When you’ve got terrorists all over the world declaring war on America and the West in the name of Islam, it’s only natural that people will have questions.

But this reasonable concern has rapidly turned into irrational suspicion, with anti-Muslim groups seizing on the opportunity to paint all Muslims in America as radical-loving, violence-approving foreigners.

The problem is that the response from American Muslims has been about as effective as Herman Cain’s PR strategy in the face of sexual harassment allegations. Instead of pooling our resources to combat radicalism, or taking a more active role in our communities so that other Americans better understand us, we’ve resorted to defense tactics.

We tell people that the Quran is being taken out of context. We focus on efforts to try to “educate” the American public. And we desperately cling to the idea that if people just had a better grasp of the facts on Islam, they wouldn’t buy into anti-Muslim propaganda.

Unsurprisingly, none of that has changed Americans' view of Islam.

So when I heard that TLC was doing a reality show about several American Muslim families, I was intrigued. The show wasn’t going to feature scholars refuting the (ridiculous) claims made about Islam. It was going to show regular Muslim families living in America. It was going to show, rather than simply tell, people about Muslims and Islam.

After three weeks of airing, “All-American Muslim” has done just that. Whether it was Mr. Aoude prepping his pregnant wife for that hectic hospital trip, or newlyweds Jeff and Shadia worrying about how their families will get along, it has shown viewers the single most important truth that will change the perceptions of Muslims: We are just like everyone else.

There has been widespread praise from TV critics, calling the show "intimate and heartfelt" and "as good as it gets" and praising TLC for how it has "upended the conventions of reality television."

The show’s premiere had 1.7 million viewers, making it the No. 2 program in its time slot among key demographics and scoring TLC's best Sunday prime time performance in more than a year.

Predictably, the show was also met with harsh and unfair criticism. Anti-Muslim groups wasted no time citing this as another example of Muslims trying to “take over” America.

This was expected. What wasn’t expected was the reaction from some other American Muslims.

“The families aren’t Muslim enough.”

“They aren’t good role models.”

"They don't represent all American Muslims."

Is the show a perfect cross-section of the American Muslim demographic? Are they the most religious families? Is it full of people you aspire to be one day?

No, of course not. It’s reality TV. It’s entertainment. We American Muslims ought to look at it in the grand scheme of things instead of just criticizing the show by saying it “doesn’t represent me.”

You’re right. It doesn’t represent you.

That’s because no TV show, no organization, no movement is ever going to represent you better than you can represent yourself.

“All-American Muslim” is not going to change the image of Muslims on its own. But it’s got the right idea. It’s premised on the fact that people judge a group not just on its beliefs, but also on their interactions with members of that group.

So if you don’t think “All-American Muslim” represents you, then go out into your community and show people what being Muslim is all about, from your perspective. Whether it’s a book club or a basketball league, we can all have our own “All-American Muslim” moments.

The most important take-away from a show like “All-American Muslim” is that we Muslims should focus our efforts on showing average Americans that we share far more in common with them than some would like them to believe.

And you don’t need a TV show to do that, you just have to have the courage to break out of your shell and share in those experiences with your American brethren.

Don’t treat TLC’s reality show as the only hope for changing our image, or as our one shot at showing America what Islam is all about. Don’t treat it as needing to be a flawless, immaculate portrayal of Muslims in America.

Treat it as a first step. Consider it a new approach. Look at it as the beginning of the long journey we have ahead, in changing the negative stereotypes about Muslims in America.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Khurram Dara.


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« Reply #23 on: Nov 29, 2011 07:42 PM »

Haven't watched the 3rd one yet!! Here's another positive view from Facebook.  Also saw this status message!!

"that's how you supposed to wrap up!" the lady at the Taco Casa drive through...and right before I was about to dismiss her as being sweet but unaware. She says "I know you do it cause you Muslim, I watch that show and you look just like that lady who put it on and who wants a baby, she so pretty and so is you!" So for all of you fellow Muslims who want to criticize All American Muslim, it is changing the hearts and minds of many people! Dear TLC, thank you!


====================

I have watched both episodes of "All-American Muslim", and I sincerely applaud TLC for putting it on the air. Despite a handful of personal frustrations, I absolutely love the message that the show portrays. I have also heard two major criticisms from a few individuals within the Muslim community - namely that the show does not represent Islam well, and that the show does not promote or highlight the clear diversity within the Islamic faith. Both seem to be reasonable criticisms, on their surface.

 

On the first point, I do not believe that "All-American Muslim" is meant to represent Islam as a religion. Rather, it is meant to portray Muslims and their standard lives. It is meant to humanize them, and to help many people to understand the normalcy and diversity in their various views and practices. The show features both practicing people, and less-practicing ones - as is the reality of the American Muslim community, or of any community. To be clear, I believe that an approach that presents a flowery ideal is not only not believable, such an approach actually serves to dehumanize Muslims in a different way than they have been traditionally dehumanized today - but still in a dangerous one. Even if respect for a faith itself should be ideally left intact, followers of any religion should never be made to be seen as almost above-human, and therefore, less than approachable. And it is worth noting that the characters in the show, out of respect for their faith, frequently differentiate between what is common religious practice, and what is their own.

 

As for the frustration that "All-American Muslim" does not represent the diversity of Muslims, I frankly do not believe that it was ever supposed to.

 

For example, some criticize and state that the show should be called "All-American Arabs". I vehemently disagree. Among some other reasons:

 

a.) This is not about Arab-American Christians - who in fact make up two-thirds of the Arab-American community - it is exclusively about Arab-American Muslims and their practices/daily lives.

 

b.) Its focus is about various religious practices, with far less weight on cultural practices. Being Muslim is the focus, not being Arab-American.

 

c.) It is not a documentary series. A "reality" show has to have a focus group/community. Had TLC put the entire focus on African-American Muslims or on the convert community, I would have said the same thing - that that should be its focus. That is how a "reality" show works - like Jersey Shore or Keeping Up with the Kardashians or 19 and Counting (sorry, I had to use three of the most "interesting" examples) - it has to be somewhat specific to be successful, based on "reality" trends.

 

Yet "All-American Muslim" could be the necessary spark for the increased involvement of American Muslims - of all communities - in media and entertainment. That is a truly positive step, and a blast against fanatics on all fronts. And that is desperately needed in order to help quell the dehumanization and bigotry that often, subtly or not, lace our national conversation.

 

Ultimately, with roughly 1.6 billion Muslims, disagreement is bound to happen. But rather than become angered and assess whether "All-American Muslim" is helpful based on a lack of ethnic/racial diversity or some "incorrect" statements in the show, let the show encourage a community conversation. From my work with other faith-based communities, there is always a wide range of opinions - some viewed as right by some, and some viewed as wrong by others. They face the same need for consistent intra-faith dialogue as American Muslims do. But that growing pain is part of having an open and truthful community conversation - and in that regard, "All-American Muslim" is a strong step in the right direction, for all American Muslims - and for all Americans.

 

The most dangerous thing for the bigots opposed to this show - including (no surprises in this list, but they are all louder than many reasonable human beings,) Robert Spencer, Pamela Geller, ACT! For America, Claire Lopez, Debbie Schlussel, World Net Daily, Free Republic, BareNakedIslam, Florida Family Association, American Decency, and the new Official Boycott TLC Facebook page - is to see a show that portrays the reality and truth of American Muslims; that they are human, are prone to normalcy, and are working for the best interests of their respective communities. And that "danger" is the reasonable human being's victory.

 

The show itself has received significantly high viewership thus far - roughly 2.8 million in two episodes - and rave reviews from high-level sources such as the New York Times, Time Magazine, Hollywood Reporter, the Atlantic, and many others. "All-American Muslim"'s premiere received the second-highest number of viewers in key demographics for any TLC reality show (second only to Sarah Palin's Alaska.) This being on a channel (TLC) that has its highest viewership in traditionally conservative states in our country where American Muslim populations are often not as prevalent. That is why these people (Spencer, Geller, Schlussel, etc.) and their bigoted organizations/teams are deeply frightened by humanization "tactics" that could ultimately affect their fear-mongering industry.

 

The blunt truth is that if American Muslims are humanized, the bigoted "market" could be threatened - thereby reducing their book sales, the success of their speaking appearances, etc. In the end, their concern is in keeping their positions of dominion over people's fears, at the expense of dehumanizing a significant and patriotic minority in our country, that is as diverse as it is proud. And yet, many if not most people still do not see how these individuals are profiteering off of a continuous and misdirected fear. Ultimately, if the bigoted critics listed above are truly concerned about their commonly-repeated question "so, where is this so-called mainstream?" - then they should celebrate an effort like this, not condemn it. Yet their reactions leave no more proof necessary of their actual intentions.

 

So, in your own capacities, work for the greater good. I have it from insiders that TLC executives were not too surprised to receive criticism from the bigots, but were indeed surprised to receive much of the same from mainstream American Muslims, who did not seem adequately informed about the purpose and scope of the show. I can say with confidence that their intentions with this show are positive for the health and future of relations in America. Whether you are Muslim or not, post about the show, get trustworthy friends on board, produce informed blog pieces, publish Facebook notes, write newspaper op-eds, submit letters to the editor, etc., in solidarity, that will all fight back against the bigoted criticism that TLC has received on the other side. Encourage friends to take a moment to watch the show, so that the advertisers do not find reason enough to pull their endorsements. And ultimately, work to get over your personal criticisms, and look at the bigger picture.

 

In the end, look at who the real enemies of "All-American Muslim" are. If these bigots can campaign against something so desperately-needed, then so too can level-headed citizens of our country, who still make up the overwhelming (if often less vocal) majority, campaign for it. It is unreal and unacceptable that fanatics of any sort make up the minority of any pot, but that they are always the loudest. So we need to bombard that dynamic with some positive change - it is possible - and I have personally seen the impact of that type of good work in action.

 

The question is - who will win over the dialogue in the end? And which side will each of us be on?
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« Reply #24 on: Dec 04, 2011 11:33 PM »

Salams,

Anyone watched the 3rd or 4th. Can't find em online anymore. Guess I'll have to wait till the end of the year or something. A shame TLC doesn't put these online on hulu or something.


Found the first two episodes here:
All-American Muslim How to Marry A Muslim Part 1-3


All American Muslim The Fast And The Furious Part 1-3
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