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Author Topic: H&M uses models created by computers, not real women, to advertise  (Read 1644 times)
jannah
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« on: Dec 11, 2011 06:08 AM »


salams,

wow well now we have to live up to completely fake computer images!!

i was just showing one of the sisters in the chat the pic of the elle model contest winner, and the girl looks literally skeletal. so much so there are articles really questioning the girl's health. still have to wonder why we as a society don't do more about this. i'd say 99% of women hate how they look/are. pretty sad.

=================================

Why does the fashion industry hate real women



We all knew this was waiting to happen, didn’t we? Not content with using ever-younger models who are clearly freaks of nature, the fashion industry has now done what it always wanted to do, deep, deep down: replaced real women, with their accompanying tears, needs, salaries, period pains, and, I don’t know, humanity, with something computer-generated.

High Street fashion chain H&M has admitted the swimwear models featured in its latest online catalogue are not real. ‘We take pictures of the clothes on a doll that stands in the shop, and then create the human appearance with a program on [a] computer . . . The message is clear: buy our clothes, not our models.’

It took a Swedish website to notice the poses and contours in each photo were identical and blow the whistle.
H&M is under fire for using fake bodies on its models in it latest bikini adverts
H&M say the message is clear - buy our clothes, not our models

Which is telling, isn’t it? Until then, the fact each body was of a uniform size, with no extraneous curves, no tiny flaw, was not enough to tip off even the most beady-eyed of observers around the world that these bodies, with their stuck-on, gurning heads, were not, in fact, God-given.

Because, over the past three decades, we have been brainwashed to accept perfection as the new reality. Cellulite, moles, a bit of a wobble here and there, a curve, a swelling of flesh at the top of thighs or even the curve of a tummy have no place on display in the fashion and beauty world.

I grew up believing models were perfect, and that I did not measure up to them, resulting in a lifetime of self-flagellation.

Only when I started working in the fashion industry did I learn that even these strange, young, other-worldly beings were not all they seemed.

I sat in the front row at a fashion show for the first time, and noticed with shock that Erin O’Connor had thread veins, Kate Moss had short legs and cellulite, and magazine cover star Angela Lindvall had bad acne.
Shocked: Liz Jones says she wants to know why the flaws that make women who they really are are erased before they meet the gaze of a woman on the street

Shocked: Liz Jones says she wants to know why the flaws that make women who they really are are erased before they meet the gaze of a woman on the street

On a shoot with the then very young Brazilian model Fernanda Tavares — now modelling the M&S Per Una range — I was shocked to notice that she had badly dyed hair, with her roots showing.

By then I was editor of Marie Claire, a woman of 40, who would never leave the house with even a millimetre of regrowth, and yet here was a world-renowned beauty who couldn’t give a fig.

I was shocked, and continue to be shocked. Why are the flaws that make women who we really are erased before they ever meet the gaze of the woman on the street, the consumer? Why are the image-makers so terrified of showing us that even the most beautiful among us possess physical blemishes?


I have asked this question repeatedly of the movers and shakers in fashion, and am always met with the same blank stare. When I challenged one magazine editor about the extremely etiolated death mask that was a recent cover photograph of Keira Knightley, she replied that ‘my readers want amazing and beautiful . . . are women so stupid to believe that the image is real?’

Um, yes. We bloody well are. The largely male, nerdy whizz kids behind all these images are so good at their job, even the most sophisticated and jaded among us continue to be fooled.

So we look down at our own bodies, and see tummy fat, and dimples on our buttocks, and we feel the need to buy stuff to fix us. We feel that if we only had that H&M bikini, the rest of us would be transformed. When it isn’t, we feel we are the ones who have failed, when the truth is it’s the garment itself.

I honestly don’t know why I am so shocked that only the heads on these H&M photos are ‘real’ (the faces, too, I’m sure have been tweaked and airbrushed). Because, even 20 years ago, photographs were being routinely doctored.
The bikinis are displayed on mannequins which are then placed onto a head using a computer
It is possible the faces in the H&M photos have also been airbrushed

In 2000, my art department at Marie Claire were able to move Renee Zellweger’s head and place it on a different body. We did this because the actress’s real body was far too thin and bony to make it onto a cover to promote the first Bridget Jones film. As soon as the movie was completed, Zellweger frantically dieted to lose the weight she had gained for the part, as quickly as possible, developing jutting bones and hair so thin that the lights of the studio bounced off her scalp. But far from our readers being able to spot the difference, no one ever even knew.

What was shocking, too, was that I did this act of subterfuge, albeit it in the reverse way to normal (fancy making an actress look less emaciated!) even though my own life had been ruined by such sleights of hand.

I would never get naked in my teens, 20s or 30s in front of a man, as I had no idea other women had cellulite, and thread veins, until I actually got to produce photographs for publication myself and saw how they were touched up. In my 20s, I experimented with strange eye drops, as I thought women should have the perfect bluey ‘whites’ to their eyes, as seen on the covers of magazines. I had no idea they would have been enhanced on screen by a nerd.

I was recently interviewed by a young male journalist for the new Industrie magazine, as I’ve been chosen as one of the 30 most influential people in fashion in the world.

He asked me why, over the years, I have become more and more anti-fashion, more and more vitriolic. I replied that as I have learned more about its artifice, and found out just how it ignores the needs of its customers, despite the pressure from me, the Government and even the editor of British Vogue, I have become more disappointed.

I told him I’m on the brink of no longer having the strength to fight these people. So, why don’t I let this latest assault on our intelligence, pockets and wellbeing slide? It is just another piece of wizardry, after all.

Nothing has changed: Lynne Featherstone promised legislation last February, but the H&M models prove that nobody in the fashion industry paid any notice to her at all

Yet let’s not forget that H&M’s customers are young, impressionable and riddled with self-doubt. They will each be trying to find their identity.

This latest scandal comes on the back of the store’s new collection of clothes inspired by the film The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo: the look the clothes promote is grungy, super-slim and drug-addled.

Magazine editors may think these young girls know the difference between fantasy and reality, but the truth is they just look grown-up and all-knowing.

I wish they could see some of the letters I receive each week from children, telling me how they feel they don’t fit in, that they will never measure up to these images.

Take this missive I received last week from a young black girl in Bradford: ‘My skin is darker at my elbows, knees and in the creases below my buttocks. Can you tell me how Kelly Rowland avoids this, and how to get her hair?’

Now, I can tell these girls about Kelly’s wigs and her hours in make-up, as I did in this newspaper on Monday. I can bang on, as I have for years, about what goes on behind the scenes at fashion shows and on photo shoots.

But still nothing has changed! Back in February, Equalities Minister Lynne Featherstone promised legislation would be brought to bear on the fashion industry to promote transparency and responsibility.

That month, I wrote in these pages that she was ‘naive if she thinks anyone in Milan or Paris will listen to her’.

Having pored over these latest images from H&M, it seems no one paid her any attention at all.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2071877/H-M-uses-models-created-computers-real-women-advertise-clothes.html#ixzz1gCfeFRKx

Nafs
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« Reply #1 on: Dec 13, 2011 08:11 AM »

Walaikum Asalaam!

I am not sure if it was me that you showed it to ..but yeah I saw the image somewhere and my o my ... In my eyes there is nothing wrong with promoting real beauty, but this idea of unreal perfected beauty is pretty awful as we can see it impacts many people :/ healthy beauty is a good thing though and it's not bad at all to promote such a thing ..  girl
um aboodi
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« Reply #2 on: Dec 13, 2011 12:17 PM »

salam

honestly, these very perfect images can mess someone's self-esteem. who can live up to that??

take care
jannah
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« Reply #3 on: Jan 18, 2012 05:44 PM »

The Best Beauty Secret Ever!!! Check it out Cheesy

Fotoshop by Adobé (Adobe)

This commercial isn't real, neither are society's standards of beauty.
Nafs
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« Reply #4 on: Jan 18, 2012 06:23 PM »

Gosh this is so crazy! And yes unreal perfected images stink Sad

hehe @ "awesome help from awesome people"
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« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2013 04:10 PM »

Here's another sad story. Apparently even Disney princesses have to be photoshopped!!

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2013/may/13/brave-director-criticises-sexualised-merida-redesign

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« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2013 04:49 PM »



Don't despair!

http://rebeccahains.wordpress.com/2013/05/13/disney-faces-backlash/

Disney faces backlash over new “sexy” Merida; pulls new image from web site as a result



On Saturday, Disney held a “coronation ceremony”(1) for Merida, star of the Disney-Pixar film Brave. In the coronation, Merida officially became part of the Disney Princess lineup. This means that her image has been added to the 2D collection of princesses in a cartoon form that fits stylistically with that of her princess peers.

Unfortunately for Disney, the new cartoon image of Merida that Disney created for the lineup overshadowed all conversation online about the coronation. The reason? The new cartoon sexualizes Merida.

That’s right: Although Merida was created by a woman as a role model for girls, the male-dominated consumer product division at Disney has ignored the character’s intended benefits for young girls, sexualizing her for profit.



Compared with her film counterpart, this new Merida is slimmer and bustier. She wears makeup, and her hair’s characteristic wildness is gone: It has been volumized and restyled with a texture more traditionally “pretty.” Furthermore, she is missing her signature bow, arrow, and quiver; instead, she wears a fashionable sash around her sparkly, off-the-shoulder gown. (As Peggy Orenstein noted when she broke the news of the redesign, “Moms tell me all the time that their preschool daughters are pitching fits and destroying their t-shirts because ‘princesses don’t cover their shoulders.’” I’ve heard the same from parents, as well.)

It doesn’t have to be this way. Some might argue that the changes to Merida are simply a result of her being rendered in 2D, but these are deliberate, calculated changes. She has been presented in 2D form in children’s books since before the movie was released, and she’s still looked like herself.

No–these changes to Merida’s appearance are significant. Sadly, they align with the American Psychological Association’s definition of sexualization, which says that sexualization occurs when any of the following four conditions are present:

a person’s value comes only from his or her sexual appeal or behavior, to the exclusion of other characteristics;
a person is held to a standard that equates physical attractiveness (narrowly defined) with being sexy;
a person is sexually objectified — that is, made into a thing for others’ sexual use, rather than seen as a person with the capacity for independent action and decision making; and/or
sexuality is inappropriately imposed upon a person.
Since Merida is beloved for breaking the princess mold, proving that a girl needn’t be stereotypically “girly” to be a princess, realigning Merida’s look to echo the other 10 Disney Princesses’ narrow range of appearances is a huge mistake.

The backlash from parents has been tremendous; a petition on Change.org already boasts more than 120,000 signatures. The petition explains:

The redesign of Merida in advance of her official induction to the Disney Princess collection does a tremendous disservice to the millions of children for whom Merida is an empowering role model who speaks to girls’ capacity to be change agents in the world rather than just trophies to be admired. Moreover, by making her skinnier, sexier and more mature in appearance, you are sending a message to girls that the original, realistic, teenage-appearing version of Merida is inferior; that for girls and women to have value — to be recognized as true princesses — they must conform to a narrow definition of beauty.

What’s more, Brenda Chapman–Merida’s creator–has gone on record voicing her outrage at this redesign. Chapman argued:

They have been handed an opportunity on a silver platter to give their consumers something of more substance and quality — THAT WILL STILL SELL — and they have a total disregard for it in the name of their narrow minded view of what will make money. I forget that Disney’s goal is to make money without concern for integrity. Silly me.

As of today, Disney has quietly pulled the 2D image of Merida from its website, replacing it with the original Pixar version. Perhaps we’ll be spared an onslaught of sexy Merida merchandise yet.

—–

If you haven’t yet signed the petition, you can do so at Change.org.

—–
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« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2013 04:56 PM »



And then there's this reaction...


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-trumble/ten-real-world-princesses_b_3275835.html#slide=more297532

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« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2013 04:22 AM »

Have to say I was a little shocked by these pictures... don't know why...

http://www.chilloutpoint.com/misc/celebrities-before-and-after-photoshop.html
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« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2013 04:47 PM »

Just saw that commerical...ugh..though it's fake...just goes to show....

I still have to see Brave and I did hear about the change...I hope the protests etc pay off...she's so cute/beautiful and of course, without seeing the movie, she was a total warrior kickin' some rear - what cooler image can you get than that?

Though I see friends/classmates agonize over split ends and the make-up issue or even comment when our medical school hosted some medical companies and one was promoting implants, my Pakistani classmate was lamenting that it made her feel bad/negative about her body image/less curves etc).

As a guy - even though it might LOOK neater, more attractive in our male eyes, the whole bone-thin look not attractive in the real world - I would make this joke - if I wanted to embrace/hug a skeleton, I could just go up to to the anatomy department Wink

I'd rather have something to actually hold if/when I embrace Mrs. WCoastbaba - know what I mean? Smiley Thankfully, most women are like that - it was great to see that a newer VS model quit the business (claiming her Christian upbringing) as she felt too used/manipulated in the chase for "perfection" and fitness.

And also, I think as it relates to the other discussion of our future relationships, it doesn't help that either, as regards the over-sexualization issue and expectations of what our spouse should look like.

BABA
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The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
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