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Author Topic: Twas The Night Before Christmas  (Read 774 times)
BrKhalid
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« on: Dec 24, 2011 08:23 PM »



So the shopping has been done, the presents have been wrapped, the stockings have been hung and huge swathes of children across the world eagerly await...

There are no doubt many traditions which accompany a modern day Christmas, the vast majority of which have very little to do with the Christian faith.

One story that has become somewhat of a Christmas tradition, however, is probably one of the most adapted works of literature in history.

When Charles Dickens wrote 'A Christmas Carol in 1843, one wonders if he knew of the impact his story would have for generations to come.


For those not acquainted with the material, it tells the story of one Ebenezer Scrooge whose dour and selfish life is transformed over the course of one Christmas Eve night.

I recall first seeing it as a school play when I must have been Tiny Tim's age and over the years each adaptation has added that little something to the enduring narrative.

In truth, there is something very universal in a tale of redemption which depicts good overcoming evil, generosity overcoming miserliness and kindness overcoming selfishness.

But yet, the story of Scrooge is more than that. It is a reminder of how easily we can get lost in this world; lost to the extent that we cannot see right from wrong. This heedlessness is sometimes so pervading that often only a real jolt to system will actually bring us back to the world of reality.

As with many others, I have always been filled with a sense of foreboding when the Ghost of Christmas Future appears and in reality the remembrance of our own mortality is very much the shock we often need to address the discrepancies in our own conduct.

No matter who we are, where we have come from or what we have done with our lives, there is always *always* a chance to stop amidst our folly and vow to make a committed change for the better.


That was the lesson that Scrooge, not only learnt, but also *implemented* and it can never be said that there is anything 'Bah Humbug' about that!!






Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
jannah
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« Reply #1 on: Dec 25, 2011 03:46 AM »

Wsalam,

It's definitely nice to see all these films and cartoons this time of year that teach morals and good values to people. I have to say the one I most remember from childhood is the Charlie Brown Xmas special!! Wink And of course there's It's a Wonderful Life! which has a lot of the elements of A Christmas Carol including showing a person their past and future and giving them a second chance at life after their 'repentance'.

While we can see the good in some things at this time of year I think actually practicing the celebrations of Christmas like decorating, putting up lights, getting a tree and exchanging gifts goes a little too far. Obviously we believe in Prophet Isa as but I think we need to remind ourselves and our children why we do NOT celebrate Christmas. Scholars warned us that this was a slippery slope and I'm honestly shocked to hear about Muslims that celebrate the traditions of Christmas even if they claim they only do the traditions and don't believe in any religious aspects. Hmmm that's like getting your baby baptized and saying you just do it because you like the tradition and don't believe in any religious aspect to it! I don't buy it. Also, for parents who feel their children are "missing out" I have to wonder if one day they won't actually convert or become atheists so that their "kids can fit in and be part of the society". I mean can you figure out if you're Muslim or not? Have some character and hold on to your faith. (K just a lil mini rant.)

And I'll leave everyone with this...


'Twas the Night of Lailatul-Qadr


'Twas the night of Lailatul-Qadr
And all through the frat
Not a creature was stirring
Not even a rat.

The guys were all sleeping
All snug on the floor,
Till one of them woke
From a loud raucous snore.

It came from outside,
Not a snore but a clatter,
So Bilal rushed to the window
To see what was the matter.

The thought of a burglar
Was his reason to hurry,
But Alhamdulilah,
'Twas old Ramadan Ali!

His charm and charisma
Could surely outdo most,
His belly shook when he laughed
Like a plate full of hummos.

His aura was commanding
Yet jovial and funny,
Like a mixture of falafel
And chicken biryani.

His angels hung their blessings
Over the chimney with care,
In hopes that we thank
Allah later through prayer.

When Ramadan Ali was done,
He hurried away,
And Bilal swore that he glimpsed
A camel-drawn sleigh.

"Bismillah-Hirrahmaan-Nirraheem!
On Faisal! On Amina! On Abdul-Kareem!
On Aisha! On Sonia! On Hussain and Imran!
On Adil! On Omar! On Rudolph Ali Khan!" (he converted)

And through the most holy night,
Bilal waved the spirit goodbye,
And the crescent-shaped moon
Caught the noor from his eye.

And as he went back to sleep,
The faint voice didn't wake 'im:
"A peaceful Ramadan to all!
As-salaam-alaikum!"
um aboodi
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« Reply #2 on: Dec 25, 2011 04:42 AM »

salam

oh that layltul qadr poem was brilliant!! I love the Rudolph Ali Khan bit :-)

My son is enamoured with Christmas.  He is asking about Santa!   He wants a gift.  I said Santa won't come to our house because we are Muslims.  I have been drilling into him for a couple of months now that we are Muslims and celebrate Eid and that we  don't celebrate Christmas. But wherever we go, someone would wish us a  merry Christmas and  he would ask why did they say that.   So I try to explain to him that they celebrate Christmas but we don't.

The Christmas thing is really encompassing this time of the year.  Allahu almusta'an.

take care
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« Reply #3 on: Dec 25, 2011 09:49 AM »

wsalam,

Yikes, I hope you explain to him that Santa doesn't exist,  it just sounds so mean to say that Santa doesn't visit Muslims!! One of the kids at the Mosque asked me the other day why Christians have a Santa and I explained to him that no he's not a real person and he said all dramatic like "Whaa they lied to us?!!", I dunno it was really funny.

Just read this article in the LA Times that makes me think ppl have gone crazy, hence all the above: http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-muslim-christmas-20111224,0,2439877.story

Honestly I think parents have more guilt trips than the kids ever do. It's not going to kill a kid not to have lights or presents on Christmas. Really, they're very resilient, they "get it" and they can get over it as long as they have their own Muslim traditions and alternatives.

Sorry for going off on that whole tangent when BrKhalid was just giving us a beautiful reminder. Back to the true message we can take from "holidays" inshaAllah:

No matter who we are, where we have come from or what we have done with our lives, there is always *always* a chance to stop amidst our folly and vow to make a committed change for the better.
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« Reply #4 on: Dec 25, 2011 05:11 PM »

salam

jazak Allah khair br. Khalid, your post contains a great message, masha'ALlah.  

And jazaki Allah alf khair  Jannah for your commentary on the topic of Kids and Christmas.  To be honest, I never thought that it might be perceived as mean to say that Santa won't come to our house because we are Muslims.  But I see your point.  So, thank you for alerting me to this. I will try to explain it better insha'Allah.  Right now we have a cartoon DVD on because everything on the Children's channel is about Christmas!!

May Allah help us  guard the amana that is our children, ameen.

take care
BrKhalid
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« Reply #5 on: Dec 25, 2011 09:07 PM »

Asalaamu Alaikum bro

Quote
His aura was commanding
Yet jovial and funny,
Like a mixture of falafel
And chicken biryani.

Must try some falafel and Biryani and see what that tastes like Wink


Quote
The Christmas thing is really encompassing this time of the year.


It really is and parents have a tough time sometimes explaining the whole Christmas thing and why, as Muslims, we don't participate in the various traditions (be they religious or not).


And as for the real message in this thread, it is ironic how much 'Islam' is contained in the world out there but somehow it escapes us since it is covered in a different guise.









Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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