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BrKhalid
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« on: Apr 04, 2011 08:47 AM »


Asalaamu Alaikum bro

If only people realised that death does not mean the end…...




Assisted dying campaigners split over right to die for those not terminally


A leading campaigner for assisted dying, who opted to die in Switzerland despite having no terminal illness, has reignited debate between supporters and opponents of the right to die


Nan Maitland, 84, who suffered from agonising arthritis, travelled to Switzerland to end her life on 1 March. She said she didn't want to suffer a "long period of decline, sometimes called 'prolonged dwindling', that so many people unfortunately experience before they die".

Two weeks before her death, Maitland, separated with three children, wrote in a message: "For some time, my life has consisted of more pain than pleasure. I have a great feeling of relief that I will have no further need to struggle through each day.

She added: "I have had a wonderful life, and the great good fortune to die at a time of my choosing."

Maitland was an active member of Friends at the End (Fate), a Glasgow-based campaign group, and was also one of the founders, in 2009, of the Society for Old Age Rational Suicide (Soars), which campaigns for "elderly, mentally competent individuals" who suffer from non-terminal health problems to be given the right to choose.

Dr Michael Irwin, a friend of Maitland's for 15 years and who accompanied her to Switzerland, said she had become increasingly debilitated by her arthritis. "It was slowing her down; she was walking less. She had begun to use a wheelchair, and standing for more than a few minutes was agonising. She did it in style. We stayed in a five-star hotel, and had a lovely meal the night before. She was so composed and dignified. She just said: 'No goodbyes' and went in."

Irwin, who has accompanied four people to Swiss clinics, said he had previously campaigned only for those suffering from terminal illnesses to have the right to assisted suicide, but now believes a wider net should include people such as Maitland.


He said recent guidelines, resulting from a case brought in 2009 by Debbie Purdy over the legal position of companions, was not enough. "A two-tier situation exists where now you can opt for it if you have the money to go abroad," he said.

Care Not Killing, an alliance that campaigns against assisted dying, said the case demonstrated "a shifting of the goalposts" by pro-rights campaigners and would place pressure on vulnerable people to end their lives if they felt they were a burden. "It's a very scary situation that not very severely disabled people could, at the drop of a hat, opt to kill themselves, and [Maitland's case] shows a ramping-up by campaigners," said a spokesman. "Many people have to live with arthritis. It does expose the lie that only people who are terminally ill will be affected by changes in the law."

But supporters said Maitland had come to a rational decision and had previously accompanied someone to Dignitas, one of two Swiss clinics offering doctor-assisted suicide.

Dr Libby Wilson, a campaigner and medical adviser at Fate, said Maitland's decision had been hard for her family. "My fight is about choice and individual responsibility. We had it with contraception and abortion, and it's logical now to say we should have choice in the way we want to die. I do draw the line. I wouldn't encourage it for people with psychological illnesses, for example, acute depression in teenagers, who have to be helped.

"Nan was a very hospitable, sociable person and she loved her friends, but she was so exhausted."


However, Dignity in Dying, which campaigns for a legal change on assisted dying in the UK, said it didn't support assisted suicide for people without terminal conditions. A spokeswoman said: "We don't think that you could faithfully have in law assistance for someone who wasn't terminally ill. Then you're making judgements about quality of life, not quality of death." She said their work was to improve the experience of death for those "where it was an inevitability".


http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2011/apr/03/assisted-dying-nan-maitland-dignitas-arthritis

Say: "O ye my servants who believe! Fear your Lord, good is (the reward) for those who do good in this world. Spacious is God's earth! those who patiently persevere will truly receive a reward without measure!" [39:10]
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« Reply #1 on: Apr 11, 2011 12:16 PM »

islamically all of this has no point of debate. But in pure worldy terms i was wondering why did this concept took so long to come. Considering the way an almost godless west headed in all aspects of life why did this never occured to anyone 50 years ago. It should have closely followed teh establishment of old age homes. I seriously want to know why thsi is so novel. Any idea any body?
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« Reply #2 on: Apr 11, 2011 08:31 PM »

salam


The West isn't Godless, it wasnt too long ago that they all did believe in God, you wouldn't have found too many atheists when I was a child, and on Sundays everything stayed shut as they all observed the sabbath.

It's just as they've got richer and live longer that they've lost their faith, and instead become more and more intertwined with the dunya.



Wassalaam

And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186
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« Reply #3 on: Apr 12, 2011 01:38 AM »

Much of the support for the right-to-die is comes from inadequate pain management and poor palliative care.

Some doctors are afraid that the patient will become addicted to pain killers, so they withhold medications and let the patient suffer.

It's not necessarily a matter of being "godless".  People are living longer with conditions that used to kill very quickly.  Sometimes it seems as though we are focused more on extending suffering than on treating the patient with compassion and keeping them as comfortable as possible in their final days.

Hospice is such a great service, and should be available to anyone that needs it.

Akram
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« Reply #4 on: Mar 25, 2012 08:29 AM »

Why we have to fear the death?If we believe in Allah,his Prophet and own as a Muslim than Allah promised
that he will give us Heaven as Prize.So after our death this Heaven is a head of us.Moreover death is our only friend
who will never give up our back.So we should take it easy and be brave to be a Muslims.
Don't we?

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« Reply #5 on: Mar 25, 2012 09:41 PM »

Its not about the fear of death, this article is supporting a persons right to die when their life becomes unbearable due to medical conditions. Yes, people are living longer, which means that our healthcare system is not always equipped to handle the effects of longterm illness. Painkiller addiction can be even worse than the pain of the disease/disorder itself. Just providing pain medication doesnt address the root cause of the pain/illness. Hospice care, in my opinion, only works in theory. Ive worked at and treated many patients from hospice care/elderly homes. Its not pretty, these people are not cared for all that well (although im sure they are being given the best care possible, its still not enough). We just dont have all the adequate knowledge, technology, and means to carry out proper longterm care for chronically ill people. I think these people who chose or support physician-assisted-suicide dont fear death, they probably welcome it. Its not a question of being godless. It is a very controversial topic.

On a side note, I am not a supporter of physician assissted suicide, I just understand all the reasoning behind it.
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« Reply #6 on: Mar 26, 2012 02:22 AM »

Just read this article today that seems relevant to the above ^ topic.

Why Doctors Die Differently
Careers in medicine have taught them the limits of treatment and the need to plan for the end



Years ago, Charlie, a highly respected orthopedist and a mentor of mine, found a lump in his stomach. It was diagnosed as pancreatic cancer by one of the best surgeons in the country, who had developed a procedure that could triple a patient's five-year-survival odds—from 5% to 15%—albeit with a poor quality of life.

What's unusual about doctors is not how much treatment they get compared with most Americans, but how little.

Charlie, 68 years old, was uninterested. He went home the next day, closed his practice and never set foot in a hospital again. He focused on spending time with his family. Several months later, he died at home. He got no chemotherapy, radiation or surgical treatment. Medicare didn't spend much on him.

Con't
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203918304577243321242833962.html

austmuslimah
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« Reply #7 on: Mar 26, 2012 11:06 PM »

I agree with sis Jannahs article. Doctors or other medical professionals tend to realize the extent and limitations of treatment available and base their decisions on "logic" rather than "emotion", if that makes sense.
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« Reply #8 on: Mar 28, 2012 06:43 PM »

Quote
Charlie, 68 years old, was uninterested. He went home the next day, closed his practice and never set foot in a hospital again. He focused on spending time with his family. Several months later, he died at home. He got no chemotherapy, radiation or surgical treatment. Medicare didn't spend much on him.

Wow.  I'm actually quite impressed that he dealt with his situation in such a way.  As a doctor, he's probably seen the whole life and death cycle many times over so he has a more rational (i don't know if that's the word to describe it but it's all I can think of) way of looking at things.  I've known people, religious people, who have completely fallen apart at the idea of dying and being given a certain amount of time to live.  Not fearing death is easy to say, not so easy to practice when you're staring directly at it.

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« Reply #9 on: Apr 20, 2012 03:45 PM »

I have been reading about this and it is unislamic. However I am not sure where the non-muslims fit in, is there a law for Muslims and another for Christians etc according to their courts, as in the "millet system" which afaik was the legal system under the Ottoman empire. So what I mean is to ask ought the muslim law and ethos be universalised against the will of for example the secularits?
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