// Ok.... about this movie....
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rahma
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« on: Sep 14, 2012 05:27 PM »


So.

What's the word on this anti-Islamic movie?

This US main stream media is going on and on and on about how Muslims are being unreasonable and how they hate America, blah, blah, blah, because of all the protests in Muslims countries against the US embassies and the violence in Libya.  They say it's all because of this movie that Muslims are getting upset.

Now, I never heard of this movie before the protests started.  I've heard absolutely no talk among Muslims about this movie.  My son finally found it on YouTube.  After 2 minutes of watching it, he had to stop.  He said it was so poorly made that it was un-watchable. 

Smart people here in the US  (i.e., the independent news media) know that the reason for the protests isn't because of this stupid movie.  These protests are against American interference, imperialism, etc.

So,

What i'm really getting at...
To my brothers and sisters out there in "Islamic countries":  Is anyone upset over this stupid movie?  Is anyone even talking about it?  If you're from a country that is having protests, what are the protesters saying...?  Please let me know.  Thanks.
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« Reply #1 on: Sep 14, 2012 05:43 PM »

ws,

I just don't get this at all. Someone insults our beloved prophet saw so then ppl go out to the streets to protest and break into embassies and destroy stuff, to the point where people are KILLED over it.  idunno This is just incomprehensible to me. It's just so messed up. Like So. Messed. Up.


Update: True Rahma you make some good points. Don't think it's about the movie itself but a lot about geo-politics and American imperialism hate. Yet I know I say this as a western Muslim, but why can't they get over it and try to do something to improve their and their countrymen's lives??
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« Reply #2 on: Sep 14, 2012 05:50 PM »

That, apparently, is the BS that main stream media wants everybody to believe.  Like I said, the smart people over here realize that this is propaganda and that people over in the Middle East and other places are just angry over American interference in their country.
As far as the Libyan violence, they (the independent media) are saying that it is a false flag, that the people who did the killing were really hired thugs....

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« Reply #3 on: Sep 14, 2012 05:58 PM »

The anti west sentiment & predominantly anti USA sentiment is IMHO to do with the people fed up of having their lives ruled by an elite who cowtow to the west whilst neglecting & abusing the people. It's more 'Arab spring' nothing to do with films.

But the western media isn't going to admit that the poor of these third world country want them & their money(oil) grabbing, living it up, taking the best of everything selves out of their country.

So theyre blaming it on a movie nobody heard of let alone saw.

I have to say tho, someone slanders the Prophet (saw) we absolutely do stand up and defend him.


And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186
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« Reply #4 on: Sep 14, 2012 11:20 PM »

Anybody got a link to the movie?

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« Reply #5 on: Sep 18, 2012 01:47 PM »

Salaams,

There has been a lot of media coverage in Australia over protests held in Sydney this past week. 

Here is a really good article from the Sydney Morning Herald which addresses some really valuable points.


The Incredible Muslim Hulk proves to be no friend of Islam either

Waleed Aly
Published: September 17, 2012 - 9:48PM


WHERE do I start? Perhaps with the viral image that will come to define this episode: a child who'd be three or four hoisting a sign triumphantly above his head blaring ''Behead all those who insult the Prophet'' while a woman, presumably his mother, thinks this is cute enough to capture on her smartphone. Alternatively, I could begin with the observation that the trailer for the anti-Islamic film that ostensibly started this all, Innocence of Muslims, is now a blockbuster, with YouTube hits in the millions thanks largely to the protesters around the world who think nobody should see it.

No. Let's start with the fact that so few of the protesters who descended on Sydney's CBD this weekend seem actually to have seen the film that so gravely offends them. When asked by journalists, they bluntly admit this, one even adding that she refuses to watch something so offensive. It's almost impressive how cyclical this stupidity is. But it's also instructive. In fact, this is the key to making sense of something so gobsmackingly senseless. The protesters - at least the ones quoted in news reports - know nothing except how offended they are.

That, you see, is all that matters. This isn't about a film. It's about an excuse. We know because we've seen it all before, like when Pakistani protesters vandalised American fast food outlets and burnt effigies of President George W. Bush in response to the Danish cartoons.

We know because so much of the weekend's ranting was nakedly gratuitous: ''Our dead are in paradise, your dead are in hell''. Pardon? Which dead? Weren't we talking about a movie?

This is the behaviour of a drunkenly humiliated people: swinging wildly with the hope of landing a blow, any blow, somewhere, anywhere. There's nothing strategic or calculated about this. It doesn't matter that they are the film's most effective publicists. It doesn't matter that they protest using offensive slogans and signs, while protesting against people's right to offend. It doesn't matter that they object to insulting people on the basis of their religion, while declaring that Christians have no morals. This is baffling only until you realise these protesters are not truly protesting to make a point. The protest is the point.

It feels good. It feels powerful. This is why people yell pointlessly or punch walls when frustrated. It's not instrumental. It doesn't achieve anything directly. But it is catharsis. Outrage and aggression is an intoxicating prospect for the powerless.

Accordingly, it is not an option to leave an insult unanswered because that is a sign of weakness, rather than transcendence.

The irony is that it grants an extraordinary level of power to those doing the offending. It puts them constantly at the centre of your world. That's why, when Gallup polled 35 Muslim majority countries, it found that of all the gripes the Muslim world has against the West, among the most pervasive is the West's ''disrespect for Islam''.

And it is this disrespect that is the overarching grievance that subsumes others. Everything, global and local, can be thrown into this vortex: Swiss minaret bans, French niqab bans, military invasions, drone strikes, racist stereotyping, anti-immigrant politics, and yes, even films so ridiculously bad that, left to their own devices, they would simply lampoon themselves.

This is what gives Innocence of Muslims meaning: not its content, but its context. It's a symbol of contempt, which is why protests against it so quickly turn into an orgy of anti-Americanism. So, ''Obama, Obama, we love Osama'' they scream, mainly because it's the most offensive rhyme they can muster. Osama, too, is a symbol; the most repugnant one in their arsenal. How better to prove you exist than to say something outrageous?

That the Obama administration immediately condemned the film in the strongest terms doesn't register. Nor that the White House took the extraordinary (and ultimately unsuccessful) step of asking Google to pull the video. This is invisible to an audience of humiliated souls waiting desperately to be offended and conflate every grievance. Indeed, they need the offence. It gives them the chance to assert themselves so they can feel whole, righteous even. It's a shortcut to self-worth.

The trouble is that in our digital world, there is always something to oblige. Anyone can Google their prejudices, and there is always enraging news to share with others. Entire online communities gather around the sharing of offensive material and subsequent communal venting. Soon you have a subculture: a sub-community whose very cohesion is based almost exclusively on shared grievance. Then you have an identity that has nothing to say about itself; an identity that holds an entirely impoverished position: that to be defiantly angry is to be.

Frankly, Muslims should find that prospect nothing short of catastrophic. It renders Islamic identity entirely hollow. All pride, all opposition, no substance. ''Like the Incredible Hulk,'' observes Abdal Hakim Murad, a prominent British Islamic scholar, ''ineffectual until provoked.''

Sometimes you need a scandal to demonstrate an underlying disease. And that's the good news here. The vast bulk of Saturday's protesters were peaceful, and Muslim community organisations are lining up to condemn the outbreak of violence. But now a more serious conversation is necessary. One that's not about how we should be speaking out to defend our prophet and ourselves. One that's more about whether we can speak about anything else.


Waleed Aly hosts the Drive program on ABC Radio National and is a lecturer in politics at Monash University. 

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« Reply #6 on: Sep 19, 2012 12:07 PM »

Best article I've read on this so far....



AN APPEAL TO THE CONTEMPORARY MUSLIM CONSCIENCE
MARDI,  18 SEPTEMBRE 2012
Http://www.tariqramadan.com/spip.php?article12539&lang=fr

 
One controversy subsides ; another worse one begins. After the Danish cartoons, the Dutch video “Fitna” and several low-grade irritants, a short, crudely executed—and scrupulously insulting—film has inflamed deep-seated resentments. Several hundred furious demonstrators gathered in front of the American Embassy in Cairo and the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya. In the confusion and violence, a U.S. Ambassador and three diplomats were killed ; elsewhere embassies came under violent attack, with many wounded and serious material damage. Literalist Salafis succeeded in mobilizing a relatively small number of demonstrators ; over-excited young people and ordinary citizens who, firm in their intention to protect the Prophet’s reputation, joined in to express their rejection of the American government and its policies. The demonstrations were the work of a tiny minority, but media coverage and the rapid spread of the protest movement has destabilized the region, and may well have substantial consequences for the future of the Middle East, and for the process of democratization and normalization. The violence must be condemned unconditionally. To attack innocents, diplomats and to kill indiscriminately is anti-Islamic by its very nature ; Muslims cannot respond to insults to their religion in this way. On this principle there can be no compromise.

Still, there is every reason to ask what lies behind such vulgar provocations (whose intent is clearly to set off a reaction by mocking Muslims’ unanimous respect for the Prophet of Islam). Here we have individuals, or interest groups (and not the American government) that make cynical use of the noblest values—freedom of speech—to attain the most poisonous objectives, promoting hatred, racism and contempt. Well-established and protected in their rich and comfortable societies, they pretend to celebrate critical intelligence and wit at the expense of a religion practiced by much less fortunate people, many of who are struggling with numerous social frustrations and are barely surviving. But behind the celebration of freedom of speech hides the arrogance of ideologists and well-fed racists who feed off the multiform humiliation of Muslim peoples, the better to mock their “crazed” and “backward” reactions, thus to demonstrate the clear "superiority" of their civilization or the validity of their resistance to the “cancer” of retrograde Islam. In criticizing this ideological stance there can be no compromise either.

In the light of the contemporary Muslim conscience, while deploring and regretting the emotive reactions of the populations of the Muslim-majority societies of the Global South we must take into account their social and historical reality. Economically and culturally disadvantaged, their political and cultural sensitivities are sorely tried by deliberate insults to the sacred symbols that give meaning to their perseverance and their lives—the very symbols invoked by leaders or Islamist tendencies to nurture resentment and to give voice to anger. This reality in no way justifies violence, but helps us to understand its source and seek out possible solutions. It is the task of the elites, the leaders, of Muslim religious scholars and intellectuals to play a leading role in order to head off explosions of anger and mob violence. They bear three kinds of responsibility.

1. First, they must turn their attention to education, and work toward a deeper understanding of Islam, one that focuses on meaning and ultimate goals, and not simply on rituals and prohibitions. The task at hand is enormous, and requires the full participation of all schools of thought.

2. Second, Islam’s extraordinary diversity must be accepted and celebrated. Islam is one, but its interpretations are many. The existence of literalist, traditionalist, reformist, mystic, rationalist and other currents is a fact, a reality that must be treated positively and qualitatively, for each of them has its own legitimacy and should (must !) contribute a multifaceted debate among Muslims. Unfortunately, today today’s Muslim religious scholars, and the leaders of various trends, are caught up in ideological confrontation—and often a clash of egos—that create division and transform them into dangerous populists who claim for themselves the title of sole and authentic representatives of Islam. Within Sunni Islam, as within Shi’ism, between Sunnis and Shi’ites, scholars and schools of thought lash out at one another, forgetting the fundamental teachings and the principles that unite them and instead splitting along doctrinal or political lines that remain secondary at best. The consequences of these divisions are serious. Populism pushes people to vent their emotions blindly in the guise of legitimacy. The attitude—or the absence of attitude—of such scholars perpetuates among the Muslims nationalist, sectarian, and often racist postures based on their particular school of thought, their nationality or their culture. Instead of calling upon individual egos to control themselves, and upon minds to understand and celebrate diversity, leaders and scholars play, in their rhetoric or in their silence, upon people’s emotions and sense of belonging with catastrophic consequences. The Great Powers, West and East, not forgetting Israel, easily exploit these divisions and internal conflicts such as the danger-fraught fracture between Sunni and Shi’a. Instead, it is imperative that voices from the two traditions collaborate on the fundamental principles that unite all Muslims. Whenever considerations of belonging threaten to replace principles, religious scholars, intellectuals and leaders must to return to shared principles, must find common ground between these considerations, in full respect of legitimate diversity.

3. Third, scholars and intellectuals must have the courage to expose themselves further. Instead of encouraging popular feelings, or to use those feelings to further their own religious identity (Sunni, Shi’a, Salafi, reformist, Sufi, etc.) or their political ideology they must face the issue squarely, dare to be self-critical, commit themselves to dialogue and—more often than not—tell Muslims what they may not like to hear about their own failings, their lack of coherence, their propensity to play the victim, failure to understand and to accept responsibility. Far from the feverish rhetoric of the populists, they must put their credibility on the line to awaken consciences in an attempt to counter emotionalism and mass blindness. The educated elites, students, intellectuals and professionals also have a major responsibility. The way they follow their leaders, as does their status as intermediaries makes their active and critical presence imperative : holding the scholars and the leaders accountable, simplifying and participating in grassroots dynamics is an absolute imperative. The passivity of the educated elites, looking down upon inflamed and uncontrolled populations far below them, is a grievous fault.

Ultimately we end up with the leaders—and the peoples—we deserve. Without committed and determined religious scholars, intellectuals and business people aware of the critical nature of the issues, there can be little doubt that we will be heading for an upsurge of religious populism among the leadership, and the emotional blindness of the masses. The words and the commitment of the leaders must set the highest standards : beginning with knowledge, understanding, coherence and self-criticism. They must abandon the notion of victimization by appealing to responsibility, by freeing themselves from the illusion that opposition to the “other” can lead to reconciliation with one’s self. Make no mistake : the violent reactions to the insults uttered against the Prophet have driven many Muslims to behaviors far removed from the principles of Islam. We become ourselves not in opposition to someone else, but in accord and at peace with our conscience, our principles and our aspirations. In the serene mastery of ourselves, and not in the aggressive rejection of the Other. Such is the message the world’s Muslims need to hear, and most of all, put into practice.
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« Reply #7 on: Sep 19, 2012 05:53 PM »

VERY INTERESTING if true...

http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2012/09/a-letter-from-scared-actress.html
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« Reply #8 on: Sep 20, 2012 04:11 PM »

This is the thing about Muslims though...

We're so PLACID about everything. Isn't there something we should put our foot down on? If not our love for the Prophet (saw), then WHAT if anything will unite us.

If we were.... Jews, for example... we would NOT let this go. We woud talk about every day and make sure it never happened again.

We should ignore it? Really? So that we become used to ignoring things like this, and when someone makes a well-directed movie we have set a precedent to continue saying nothing?

I'm not saying flag-burning is the answer. But for reals, we're just going to let this pass?

The sentiment in the ROW (rest of the world), is that doing nothing is simply not good enough anymore.
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« Reply #9 on: Sep 20, 2012 04:15 PM »

As far as fixing ourselves before we react.... a friend put it succinctly:

You insult my Prophet, but wait, let me get my PhD before I respond to you.

Yeah, amongst other things, we need to get real about our present-day circumstances, and make them work for us (at the same time as working to improve them).
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« Reply #10 on: Sep 20, 2012 07:29 PM »


If we were.... Jews, for example... we would NOT let this go. We woud talk about every day and make sure it never happened again.


Actually, the opposite is true.  Make weirdo pictures of Abraham, Moses as much as you want, neither the Jews or the Christians will bat an eyelid.  And that is the crux of the problem.  In the West, religion is a joke to many and a private thing for all the rest.  So, when Muslims say they are deeply offended at some harmless cartoons, the Western response is "get over it; it's freedom of speech."

Furthermore, for us, innuendo about the prophet is a proxy for racism and bigotry.  Criticism of Judeo-Christian Icons carries no such message.  That's the real reason why you see so many migrant worker, unemployed muslims getting so worked up about the issue.

In regards to how we as muslims should view the protests:  well for me, its clear, these demonstrations are very, very political.  They are attempts by fringe Muslim parties trying to make an impression and garnering media attention.  These demonstrations, in Bangladesh and elsewhere were organized by politicos, albeit bearded ones wearing a cap.

In regards to how we should voice our disgust: i think folks should make it clear, that insulting the prophet, etc is worse than insulting one's parents.  And we should also shake our heads and say to them "We are surprised if you don't care if your religious icons are abused and insulted.  However, we do care, and we are offended.  And while its harmless, its still very important to make it clear our shock and dismay."



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« Reply #11 on: Sep 20, 2012 08:24 PM »

Actually  I think Muslims should be up in arms at insults to every single Prophet. Jesus and Moses are also Prophets in Islam.

The west no longer holds anything but money sacred.

And I think that is the crux of the problem, that demonising and insulting  an unlettered man born in the desert 1400 years ago can stir up such passionate hurt and anger is outside of the realms of their own comprehension. We are strange to them so they react to our reaction with fear and disdain.

They only do these things because they know we can't do anything about it, because the Muslims in power are their lap dogs and will never ever take action to prevent this from happening again.

I'd love for a muslim ruler to send an embassador to the country to tell the PM this film buiness has been terribly upsetting....oh and by the way we're going to have to raise the oil prices by a billion percent next year....because well frankly we can, its our freedom of expression.........


And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186
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« Reply #12 on: Sep 20, 2012 09:58 PM »

ws,

I don't think the issue here is about being upset and offended about people insulting our beloved Prophet and Deen. It's how we go about it. Muslims are very emotional people and it shows. You said the Jews would not let this go if this happened to them and you're right they wouldn't. They would start organizations like the ADL, put people in key places, work with the media and have a 20-year vision of how they would eliminate this. Tell me I'm wrong.

Muslims, they want to go to the streets and protest and destroy stuff. Hmmm and this helps defend our Prophet how? Lastly it's just so hypocritical to Westeners. They can't understand why Muslims are so upset by this and not about every other abuse happening in the Muslim world. This cartoon seems to say it all.


I'm sorry but Muslims abusing Muslims and Islam is more offensive to me than some guy making a youtube trailer.
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« Reply #13 on: Sep 21, 2012 04:40 AM »

That's exactly right..

I really think we can do something about it (and all other problems we face). And I really don't mean "we, the muslims" ... but rather, "we, madina board people"...

Maybe we can come up with some practical, implementable ideas that we can pass around to our communities as well. If we are the lucky few with income and literacy under our belts, it's time we did something.

I'm going for Umrah today (inshaAllah)... I plan on remembering all of you and the Ummah in my prayers.
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« Reply #14 on: Sep 22, 2012 05:07 PM »

And one more article:


http://www.vice.com/read/the-innocence-of-white-people


So I’ve just received an email from a reader, asking whether I might have something to say about The Innocence of Muslims. “Is tolerance for satire really a concept that is not compatible with Islam?” he asks. “Is there something about all this indignation that ‘we,’ the West, don’t understand?”

When asked to explain Muslim rage, I have an answer, but I already know the response to my answer. A defender of “Western civilization” will tell me, “Yeah, but we aren’t violent. They’re the ones who kill people over religion.” If numbers matter, however, the mythology of “America” kills many, many more people today than any myth of “Islam.” To sustain a pseudo-secular military cult, we have produced a nation of cheerleaders for blood and murder. We speak of the cult’s heroic work as “sacrifice” and say that it’s all for a divine cause of “freedom.”

That’s what we send out there, at them. This is not simply a world in which one side has a sense of humor and the other does not, or one side is “modern” and “enlightened” while the other side needs to catch up. The modern, enlightened side is burning people alive. Innocence is simply the playground bully calling your mother a slut after already breaking your jaw, and then wondering why you can’t take a joke.

I am not trying to excuse violence. As an artist, I support everyone’s right to make shitty, cheap-looking art, and I do not believe that bloodshed is ever an acceptable way of responding to art. But in the big picture, this isn’t really about violent religion vs. nonviolent art; it’s violence vs. violence.

Last week, the day on which my column runs happened to fall on September 11. My column was not about September 11; I offered no recollections of the day, no meditation on where we’ve gone as a nation since then, no diagnosis, no hope for a better future, and no apology on behalf of “moderate” Muslims. Instead, I wrote about drugs. It seems that every year, the anniversary produces a number of Muslim bloggers and commentators publicly performing our love of peace, assuring everyone that we, too, shared in the suffering of that day. I am thankful for them and respect their efforts, because this is work that needs to be done.  But I did not try.

The reason for my silence on 9/11 is that I am not only Muslim. I am also American. I am also white. I am male and heterosexual. However, I am not asked, as an American, to reflect on the yearly anniversary of our atomic bombs falling upon Japan, or our countless military interventions throughout the world. There is no date on the calendar for me, as a white person, to demonstrate that I have properly reflected on slavery and the generations of inequality and naked white sadism between the slave era and our own unjust present; we could potentially have such a day, but often turn it into shallow self-congratulation. As a white person, I am not asked to consider the wanton murders of young black men by white cops or white civilians, or the white terrorism of shootings in gurudwaras, as directly relevant to my identity. Nor do I have a designated anniversary for reflection, as a straight man, on the horrifying statistics of rape or the ways in which heterosexism makes this country unsafe for so many.

As a Muslim, however, people do expect me to show evidence of my soul-searching over a single event, and I am regularly instructed by popular media to imagine 9/11 as a cancer within my own self. Journalists ask me about Islam’s “crisis” as though it’s a private demon with whom I must personally wrestle every day; meanwhile, my whiteness remains untouched and unchallenged by the decade of hate crimes that have followed 9/11. Journalists don’t often ask whether “white tradition” can be reconciled to modern ideals of equality and pluralism, or whether the “straight male community” is capable of living peacefully in America. When it comes to my participation in America, my whiteness and maleness are far more likely than my Islam to wound others, and thus perhaps more urgently in need of “reform” or “enlightenment” or whatever you say that Islam needs. Again, this is only if numbers matter.

Yes, there’s something that we, the self-identified “West,” don’t understand: ourselves. We see the violence that we want to see. We ignore our legacy of hatred and destruction, always wondering how they can even look themselves in the mirror.

Michael Muhammad Knight is the author of eight books, including Journey to the End of Islam, an account of his pilgrimage to Mecca.
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« Reply #15 on: Sep 22, 2012 11:22 PM »

Shared by Norman Finkelstein on FB

The Free Speech Diary
by ESAM AL-AMIN
Beirut, Lebanon – September 17, 2012

In a rare public appearance, Hizbollah leader Hasan Nasrallah addressed tens of thousands of angry followers protesting the anti-Islam film “Innocence of Muslims.” The charismatic leader accused the U.S. of facilitating the movie with the intention to insult and humiliate Islam and Muslims. He further stated that the U.S. needed to be held accountable for the film and for creating ‘strife’ between Muslims and Christians. “The film was made and spread from the U.S,” Nasrallah added. “Muslims should say to the U.S.: ‘This happened in your country’.”

Even though peaceful demonstrations represent a civilized way to express strongly-held beliefs, and expressions of anger and protestations, the gulf between Muslim and Western societies is still very wide. While calls for international laws against libel, slander, or incitement that lead to the imminent breach of peace are legitimate, even laudable, unsubstantiated accusations are not. Muslim scholars, leaders, institutions, and governments must understand the cultural, legal, and political limits placed on secular democratic governments. While criticizing the U.S. or French governments of double standards when it comes to free speech against Muslim sensibilities is legitimate, accusing them of producing or promoting the vile movie or the offensive political cartoons is not only wrong, but also counterproductive.

There are two competing interests that prudent legal minds must reconcile in the interest of preserving global peace and harmony, namely free speech and expression that allow legitimate criticism, or unlimited harsh, even hostile, analysis, on the one hand, and the ban of libel, slander, and violent incitement on the other. Indeed all civilized societies have laws that criminalize or impose hefty fines on such transgressions.

Libel and slander are forms of defamation. Defamation is a common law tort in which an individual makes a publication or representation of a defamatory statement concerning an individual or entity that damages his or its reputation or standing. The elements of such transgressions include: the defamatory statement; the publication of the statement which the instigator knew or should have known was false; and finally that such statement or depiction caused injury to the subject of thecommunication. One could easily argue that all these elements were covered in the current cases. The challenge is how to widen Western slander and libel laws to also protect the reputation and legacy of historical venerated figures and symbols from outrageous insults and despicable fabrications of their lives.

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« Reply #16 on: Sep 24, 2012 05:05 PM »

15 people dead in your country hard2hit. And the gov't gives people a day off to protest??? Uhhh what is going on there??
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« Reply #17 on: Sep 24, 2012 05:31 PM »

I'm with you Sis J - what happened in Pakistan last Friday frustrates me so much - I know they have other greviences with teh drones etc, but this is no way to protest - I saw some smarter individuals who helped clean up and other Pakistanis who decried what occurred. In case you haven't seen it yet, Sh. Yasir Qadhi's thoughts on the matter. Very wise words.


Yasir Qadhi responds to the insults towards Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) | 19th September 2012

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
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« Reply #18 on: Sep 27, 2012 02:39 AM »

ws,

I don't think the issue here is about being upset and offended about people insulting our beloved Prophet and Deen. It's how we go about it. Muslims are very emotional people and it shows. You said the Jews would not let this go if this happened to them and you're right they wouldn't. They would start organizations like the ADL, put people in key places, work with the media and have a 20-year vision of how they would eliminate this. Tell me I'm wrong.

Muslims, they want to go to the streets and protest and destroy stuff. Hmmm and this helps defend our Prophet how? Lastly it's just so hypocritical to Westeners. They can't understand why Muslims are so upset by this and not about every other abuse happening in the Muslim world. This cartoon seems to say it all.
I'm sorry but Muslims abusing Muslims and Islam is more offensive to me than some guy making a youtube trailer.

I agree. Of course we should be offended by people insulting the Prophet pbuh-but this is not the way to go about protesting this. So far I passed around a "Letter from a Muslim" which very respectful but firmly put down that we do defend our Prophet, but we condemn those who use violence to do so. (on Facebook, you may have seen it) . It had a very positive response and people shared it around...imagine if we did something like that in real life!
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« Reply #19 on: Sep 27, 2012 08:24 AM »

Did anyone watch/read Obama's address to the UNGA? I read an article somewhere(I think on NYT or WSJ) written by a liberal democrat who didn't want to vote for Obama.
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« Reply #20 on: Sep 27, 2012 05:52 PM »

A video and more info:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/26/anti-islam-film-libya_n_1916278.html?utm_hp_ref=email_share

The anti-Islam film that sparked violent protests in several Muslim countries had "nothing to do with the deadly attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi earlier this month," Libya's president Mohammed Magarief told NBC's Ann Curry on Wednesday.

Magarief said he believes the attack -- which killed four Americans, including U.S. ambassador to Libya J. Christopher Stevens -- was "a pre-planned act of terrorism" that had been planned to coincide with the 11th anniversary of 9/11.

The Libyan president's comments contradict statements made 10 days ago by Susan Rice, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.

Rice told Fox News on Sept. 16 that "[w]hat sparked the violence was a very hateful video on the Internet."

"It was a reaction to a video that had nothing to do with the United States," she added.

She also stressed that "the best information and the best assessment we have today" is that the attack was not "preplanned," but “spontaneous.”

The Obama administration has maintained that the attack on the consulate in Benghazi wasn't premeditated.

Yet Magarief tells a different story. The Libyan president has reiterated several times since the tragedy that the attack was planned in advance and was not a reaction to the YouTube video "Innocence of Muslims."

"The idea that this criminal and cowardly act was a spontaneous protest that just spun out of control is completely unfounded and preposterous," Magarief told NPR earlier this month. "We firmly believe that this was a pre-calculated, pre-planned attack that was carried out specifically to attack the U.S. Consulate."

After the attack occurred, Magarief apologized to the United States on behalf of the Libyan people.

"We consider the United States as a friend, not only a friend, a strong friend, who stood with us in our moment of need," he told NBC News.
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« Reply #21 on: Sep 30, 2012 12:45 AM »

You will not believe it...

In Bangladesh, they have banned many Google services and Youtube.  That means thousands of sites using some aspect of Google Services is banned.  For example, you cannot download your gmail attachments!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!   The only way to get your attachments is to use a mail handler like Apple Mail.  Many mail handlers like Thunderbird don't work though.

This whole film has given the authorities an excuse to ban gmail, youtube and stuff enabling people to deseminate information.  There are elections next year.  What will happen then?Huh?  Will they use the same excuse?


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« Reply #22 on: Oct 03, 2012 09:43 AM »

I wanted to share this, and I hope it can make a difference:

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/outlaw-offending-prophets-major-religions/94kL1tsN
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