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Author Topic: The Gospel of Consumption  (Read 1783 times)
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« on: May 06, 2008 06:42 AM »


Salams,

This is an interesting (and very long) article on how consumerism developed in the US. It also talks about the benefits of a shorter working day. What I've been trying to tell people all along!! Working part time is the best!

The Gospel of Consumption
And the better future we left behind


PRIVATE CARS WERE RELATIVELY SCARCE in 1919 and horse-drawn conveyances were still common. In residential districts, electric streetlights had not yet replaced many of the old gaslights. And within the home, electricity remained largely a luxury item for the wealthy.

Just ten years later things looked very different. Cars dominated the streets and most urban homes had electric lights, electric flat irons, and vacuum cleaners. In upper-middle-class houses, washing machines, refrigerators, toasters, curling irons, percolators, heating pads, and popcorn poppers were becoming commonplace. And although the first commercial radio station didn’t begin broadcasting until 1920, the American public, with an adult population of about 122 million people, bought 4,438,000 radios in the year 1929 alone.

But despite the apparent tidal wave of new consumer goods and what appeared to be a healthy appetite for their consumption among the well-to-do, industrialists were worried. They feared that the frugal habits maintained by most American families would be difficult to break. Perhaps even more threatening was the fact that the industrial capacity for turning out goods seemed to be increasing at a pace greater than people’s sense that they needed them.

Continued: http://www.orionmagazine.org/index.php/articles/article/2962
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« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2008 12:51 PM »

As salaamu alaikum

Thanks for sharing this.  It puts a lot of things in perspective and also points out that it will be just as long a process to break free of the cycle as it was to launch the cycle.

Time for family and friends is indeed so important; no amount of material goods can ever take the place of that "priceless" time.

As salaamu alaikum

Fa'izah
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