// Inspiring Stories about Boston
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tahirah
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« on: Apr 18, 2013 11:09 PM »


salam

I thought we could start a separate thread to post the awesome inspiring stories that are coming out about the first responders, runners, and others in the face of the tragedy.

I'll start with this tweet from NBC Sports Network: "Reports of Marathon Runners that crossed finish line and continued to run to Mass General Hospital to give blood to victims #PrayforBoston"

https://twitter.com/NBCSN
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« Reply #1 on: Apr 20, 2013 02:11 AM »

Nice article about the now-famous Uncle Ruslan in the Washington Post



Uncle Ruslan’s inspiring words — a moment we needed


Ruslan Tsarni is angry.

Uncle of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects whose baseball-capped images have been flickering over our TV sets for the past day, one of whom at the time of this writing is still the subject of a manhunt, Tsarni emerged into his yard in Maryland and delivered an impromptu news conference that has already slipped into the realm of meme and legend.
He denounced the men responsible for Monday’s tragedy. Asked what the suspects’ motive might have been, he responded, “Being losers.”

In the midst of an unfolding story, it is difficult to comment. No formulating your thesis before all the facts come rolling in. No reviews before the movie ends. No obituaries with George Soros still alive and kicking. But the half-tirade, half-inspirational speech from the man Twitter is already dubbing “Uncle Ruslan” was an isolated, brilliant moment in the midst of chaos. It was Antoine Dodson meets that sorority sister whose irate rant has been lighting up the blogs. But it was more than that. It was quotable. It was timely. It was poignant. It was wild, dramatic, angry, over-the-top. We can learn a great deal in the upcoming hours and weeks and it will not alter the peculiar magic of this speech.

Tsarni began by delivering condolences. “Those who were injured — this boy, this Chinese girl, the young 29-year-old girl — I’ve been following this from day one.” He is with us. He is one of the millions of people watching, horrified, as this unfolds. The New Yorker’s Nicholas Thompson said he looked like he was about ready to go hunt down the suspects himself. People on Twitter are already comparing him to a Russian Chuck Norris. You don’t want to be on Uncle Ruslan’s bad side. Best Dramatic Performance by an Uncle, people on Twitter said. Skip the Eugene O’Neill plays. Give this man a talk show. Give him everything we have to give. Fire Uncle Sam. Get us Uncle Ruslan.

This is the sort of inspiring speech that we all hope we could give, under any circumstances — much less the one in which he was asked to step up and speak up. Anything that rears its head after moments of tragedy, he covered. He was irate at the perpetrators of this violence and said they did not deserve to be on this Earth.

He acknowledged our unhappy tendency to spread the blame to entire groups. (“He put a shame on our family. … He put a shame on the entire Chechen ethnicity because now everyone blames Chechens…. When a Muslim or a person of color does something, someone always has to defend the whole community.”)

“Dzhokhar, if you are alive, turn yourself in and ask for forgiveness from the victims, from the injured and from those who left,” he pleaded to the surviving suspect.

People like Uncle Ruslan remind us that it’s the apples, not the barrel. Here is the humanity the bombers themselves were missing, in indignant spades. It’s what the comedian Patton Oswalt posted on Facebook right after this happened. “…Every once in awhile, the wiring of a tiny sliver of the species gets snarled and they’re pointed towards darkness. But the vast majority stands against that darkness and, like white blood cells attacking a virus, they dilute and weaken and eventually wash away the evil doers and, more importantly, the damage they wreak… So when you spot violence, or bigotry, or intolerance or fear or just garden-variety misogyny, hatred or ignorance, just look it in the eye and think, “The good outnumber you, and we always will.”” He’s right. We outnumber you. Your uncle is on our side, not yours.

It would have been remarkable if it had stopped there. But it didn’t.
A reporter asked Tsarni his opinion of America. He spoke eloquently. “I teach my children. This is the ideal micro-world in the entire world. I respect this country. I love this country. This country which gives chance to everybody else to be treated as a human being and to just to be human being. To feel yourself human being.”
I hope we keep living up to that.

To hear this from the uncle of the suspects, who (if the behavior of our worse angels in previous similar circumstances is any indication) could be on the receiving end of serious ugliness himself, is a real testimony to all the best things we hope are true about this country. And this in the midst of memorable yelling about the shame his nephews have brought on their family and their entire ethnicity. (“Losers!”)

“From now on, I ask you to respect our property,” he concluded. I hope we do. I hope we keep showing the good side of this place he’s chosen to make his home. He certainly managed to. Let’s keep being the place that Ruslan Tsarni believes we are. After all, the last thing America needs is to get on Uncle Ruslan’s bad side.
He ended: “Again, with the families of those who suffered, we share the grief with them… We seek forgiveness. Thank you.”

Thank you.

This was a moment we all needed.


http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost/wp/2013/04/19/uncle-ruslans-inspiring-words-a-moment-we-needed/
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« Reply #2 on: Apr 20, 2013 10:38 AM »

Me joining the Uncle Ruslan fan club....




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« Reply #3 on: Apr 20, 2013 03:52 PM »

And yet everyone else in the kids' family said that the boys would never do this and that they were framed....




Mother & Father Of Boston Bombing Suspects Speak Out!
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« Reply #4 on: Apr 22, 2013 02:43 AM »

Muslim man who lost his pregnant daughter in 9/11 offers free coffee to volunteers and first responders after the Boston bombing



For 9/11 victim’s family, grief is reignited

Ysuff Salie knows better than most how they feel.

He has been where the families of Martin Richard, Krystle Campbell, Lingzi Lu, and Sean Collier are right now. He knows what it’s like to lose someone you adore in a heinous, historic moment. He has felt the worst-imaginable personal pain amid immense public grief, known an anguish few see even as the whole world watches.

His daughter Rahma, 28, and pregnant with her first child, died in the September 11 attacks. She was a passenger on Flight 11, bound for a wedding in California with her husband Micky.

“You went into aimlessly looking at things and walking around and not really knowing what to do” afterward, he recalled last week. “We were numb, for many months, many years.”

As the family tried to absorb their loss, the aftermath of the attacks that killed Rahma played out all around them. The footage of the burning towers played in an endless loop. The repercussions unfurled over months.

Her brother Afkham couldn’t avoid the news, “but I definitely wasn’t looking for it,” he said. “I wasn’t associating it with my sister. She was gone, she was gone . . . There was nothing I could do to change anything.”

Monday’s bombings happened just a couple of blocks from L’Aroma, the cafe the Salie family owns on Newbury Street. Ysuff’s shaken staff called him at home: They had seen people bleeding, and they were afraid. He told them to close up. Then he turned on the TV, and that lost feeling returned.

“I was really in a daze,” he said. “Even today I am in a daze. Nothing seems to register with me.”

But he knew he had to reopen quickly. He thought of the people who would be walking around the area, feeling aimless themselves, and of the police and volunteers down on Boylston — men and women like those who had responded on 9/11, who might need a break and something to drink. An employee put up signs telling volunteers and first responders the coffee was on the house.

“It was repaying people for the kindness they showed us,” Ysuff said.

So many were kind to her family in the days and months after Rahma’s death. Friends and relatives made it a mission to distract them. Strangers offered help and condolences. The loss was not theirs alone.

“I’m sorry,” I said, as Ysuff spoke of Rahma’s sweetness.

“I know,” he said quietly. “Everyone is.”

Afkham feels blessed to have had Rahma in his life, sorry for everybody who didn’t get to meet her, grateful for the condolences. Losing his sister the way he did means his family’s “100 percent personal” loss will never be fully that.

“I am a little exhausted when the anniversary comes around,” Afkham said. “It’s a hard day for me, and I prefer it to be a quieter day.”

There has been much talk over the last week about how Monday’s bombings won’t change us. But some among us will be changed, and forever. After we recover from the initial shock, after we know all we can about how and why these men did what they did, after we begin to get on with our lives, they will be left with their losses.

For most of us, this horrific week will become an emblem of a city’s grit and resilience. For them, it will be emblematic of nothing bigger — nothing smaller — than empty places at their dinner tables.

On warm days, Ysuff Salie walks less than two blocks from his cafe on Newbury Street to the 9/11 memorial in the Boston Garden. He finds a bench by the horseshoe-shaped sculpture, which will surely soon have a companion somewhere nearby to fix the memory of this awful week. He finds himself with thoughts we all share, or will.

“I sit and wonder, ‘What is all this?’ It’s just not the normal thing, right?”

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2013/04/20/for-victim-family-grief-reignited/46ZSUzYeLBiYnNMJthA9IN/story.html

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« Reply #5 on: Apr 22, 2013 11:00 PM »






Jannah, lol, I found his reference to AOL so funny too.   Cheesy
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« Reply #6 on: Apr 23, 2013 02:02 AM »

Before you get all fuzzy and warm over the uncle, read this:

http://www.madcowprod.com/2013/04/22/was-boston-bombers-uncle-ruslan-with-the-cia/

He was a spook for the CIA. 
Real decent guy....  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #7 on: Apr 25, 2013 01:35 PM »

Rahma that article is like rampant speculation and is trying so hard to connect the dots but everything in this world is connected so don't see it as an indictment of anything. What I do see is Uncle Ruslan on TV condemning terrorists, denouncing terrorism and saying it has nothing to do with Islam. That deserves a cheer.


In other news gas station attendant was Muslim: 

 
Quote
They pulled into the Memorial Drive Shell gas station and Mary’s Deli food mart at Memorial Drive and River Street in Cambridge after midnight. Video surveillance shows the victim of the carjacking fleeing to a Mobil gas station across the street, according to Alan Mednick, the Shell station’s general manager. The brothers did not buy anything, Mr. Mednick said.

“Maybe they were going to try and buy something, but the guy took off running,” he said.

At the Mobil station, Tarek Ahmed, 45, was working the overnight shift when, he said, a panicked man “came in running.”

“He opens the door,” Mr. Ahmed recalled in an interview. “I stood up. He was screaming, saying: ‘Call the police. They have bombs. They have a gun. They want to kill me.’ I thought he was drunk.”

Then Mr. Ahmed realized he was serious.

“He ran behind the counter and ran into the back room, a storage room, and locked the door,” Mr. Ahmed recalled. “At this moment, I believe him. He was honest, that somebody wanted to shoot him. So I took the phone, and I called 911.

“I tried not to look outside at anything. I wanted to make it appear as if nothing was wrong. I was hoping the suspects didn’t see where he went. At the same time, I told the police what happened. As I’m talking to the police, I back up slowly and knock on the storage room door. The guy opened the door, and I handed him the phone.”

The carjacking victim left his cellphone in the Mercedes, a law enforcement official said, allowing officials to track it.


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/25/us/officers-killing-spurred-pursuit-in-boston-attack.html?pagewanted=2&_r=0
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« Reply #8 on: Apr 30, 2013 03:10 PM »

Amazingly beautiful!

================
Bagel Business Owner Donates 100-Percent Of Profits To One Fund Boston

http://boston.cbslocal.com/2013/04/29/bagel-business-owner-donates-100-percent-of-profits-to-one-fund-boston/

BOSTON (CBS) – Businesses large and small have reacted to the Boston Marathon bombings, but for the owner of Bagel Land in Winchester, this is personal, very personal.

Ehab Sadeek is an Egyptian Muslim who calls the marathon bombers “cowards.”

“They don’t represent my faith. They don’t represent my religion. They will not hijack my religion,” he told WBZ NewsRadio 1030.

“Being a Muslim, I felt I cannot stay quiet about that.”

So Sadeek says, with the urging of his young daughter, he has decided to give 100-percent of the profits from his retail bagel business to the One Fund Boston, and he will keep it up until the last victim is out of the hospital.

As of Monday, 29 victims of the marathon bombings remained in the hospital.

“I hope they come home soon, but we are committed to do it,” Sadeek said.

Sadeek says the attacks at the marathon were personal to him.

“If I stay quiet about it then I am giving these terrorists a chance to hijack my religion. I know what I stand for,” Sadeek said.

Meanwhile, his customers are amazed.

“I just think it’s awesome. I am a regular here so I had to come by and support him,” Patrick Keith of Stoneham said.

“I just think it’s a great way to give back to such a tragic event. It’s wonderful thing he does,” Babs Andrade of Winchester said.

It’s been just a few days and the shop has donated more than $1,000 already. Sadeek says his sacrifice pales in comparison to what the victims are going through.

“Some of them have given their own life. Nothing compares to that,” Sadeek said as he fights back tears.
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« Reply #9 on: Apr 30, 2013 04:18 PM »

 subh ! ....
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