// Miss America looks more Indian than Indians!!
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« on: Sep 19, 2013 12:17 PM »


My actual first thought was... dang she really looks Indian!! Indians are not gonna like this!! It's pretty awesome if you ask me... pisses off the racist Indians and racist Americans... what more can one ask for Wink

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Miss America and the Indian Beauty Myth

Nina Davuluri made history Sunday night when she became the first Indian-American to be crowned Miss America. Much of the media coverage since has focused on the entirely predictable racist comments tweeted after she won ("OMG Miss America is a terrorist!" -- wow, I didn't see that one coming). Of course, that only lasted a few hours before public shaming websites popped up exposing the bigoted tweeters and encouraging followers to spam them back. The pushback is heartening and well-intentioned, but misses what ought to be the real shame target: India. After all, despite being a country of almost a billion people, India has left it to America to crown the first Indian beauty queen who looks... well, Indian.

The Indian beauty myth has its roots in the so-called history of the Aryan-Dravidian divide, which has permeated Indian consciousness for decades. As the story goes, Aryans invaded India sometime in 1200 B.C., driving Dravidians, the original Indian race, farther south. The Aryans-in-the-North and Dravidians-in-the-South theory supposedly explained linguistic differences between the two regions. More importantly, it explained why North Indians were lighter skinned than South Indians, an idea which gained traction during the racial stratification of British rule and elevated the social status (read: marriageability) of lighter-skinned Indians above their darker counterparts. The Aryan-Dravidian myth was debunked in 2009 by a study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School, which used DNA samples from Indians in both regions to prove that there was no genetic difference between the two. Still, the idea that some Indians have a claim to "whiteness" continues to rule the country's concept of beauty.

Take, for example, Bollywood actress and former Miss World, Aishwarya Rai. Known as "the most beautiful woman in the world," Rai is India's crown jewel of female Indian beauty and the standard against which all other Indian women are compared -- despite the fact that she has barely-olive skin, brown hair and green eyes, practically a mutation in the predominantly dark-complected subcontinent. Do a Google search of historical and recent Miss India winners and other top-billed Bollywood actresses, and you'll see why Indians collectively spend more on skin-whitening products than they do on Coca Cola (about $470 million), including creams, face cleansers, shower gels and -- I'm not kidding -- vaginal washes. The industry is supported by the Bollywood stars themselves, who do ad campaigns for major companies like Fair & Lovely. A typical ad has a movie star tossing a tube of lightening cream to a dark-skinned fan, who miraculously transforms into a star also.

The trickle-down effects of the beauty myth can be seen in Indian matrimonial sites, where the most desired quality in a would-be bride is that she be "fair." The racism goes both ways: Indian women seem to seek "fair" in a potential partner as well, though men can usually trump this requirement by 1) being a doctor; 2) being tall; or 3) living in the U.S. Unfortunately for the gals, education, height and country of residence don't count for all that much: If you're dark, you're basically left to scramble after the scraps on the marriage market. It's no wonder that in the U.S., "intermarriage" -- marriage to non-Indians -- occurs at a much higher rate among Indian women than Indian men. I guess it's better to be considered "exotic" and desirable by members of other races than to be considered ugly by your own.

For all the racist commentary following Davuluri's win at Miss America, the fact remains that America is way ahead of India in celebrating a realistic ideal of Indian beauty. In fact, Davuluri is following in the footsteps of other darker-skinned Indian women who have been recognized in America for their talent and beauty, like The Office's Mindy Kaling or ER's Parminder Nagra -- women who'd never get a second glance in India. Davuluri's title offers some vindication for the Indian women and girls whose value, according to Indian standards, has been eclipsed by the color of their skin; with luck, it will be a wake-up call for India to follow America's lead and finally start taking note of the real beauty of Indian women as well.
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« Reply #1 on: Sep 19, 2013 12:24 PM »

skin whitening vaginal washes.....SERIOUSLY!

And when My servants question thee concerning Me, then surely I am nigh. I answer the prayer of the suppliant when he crieth unto Me. So let them hear My call and let them trust in Me, in order that they may be led aright. Surah 2  Verse 186
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« Reply #2 on: Sep 19, 2013 12:37 PM »

skin whitening vaginal washes.....SERIOUSLY!
And armpit whitening deodorants.

I'm waiting for the time when even this will be mentioned in matrimonial ads, that the girl has to be light skinned all over lol
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« Reply #3 on: Sep 20, 2013 03:45 PM »

Yeah the Fair and Lovely creams...and yes, I've heard about the private-area lightening creams before...sad..Yeah I though it was awesome she won, though I had no idea the contest was happening until I went online and check the day's news.

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« Reply #4 on: Sep 20, 2013 03:51 PM »

this is hilarious... (has a lot of swear words)


The Truth with Hasan Minhaj: Nina Davuluri (Miss America) is the new America
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« Reply #5 on: Sep 20, 2013 03:54 PM »

Will check that out Sis J -  but here is another view of the race issue from an Indian American.

Why I'm Not Proud an Indian-American Is Miss America

There is nothing I hate more than when an Indian person does well at something.

It's not some sort of innate self-loathing (well, not for that reason anyways) or jealousy, but because news reports of any noteworthy South Asian achievement are immediately followed by texts from friends of "Did you see? S/He's INDIAN." It's as if this stranger's victory is all the more palpable to me by some grace of shared concentration of melanin, and I never know how to respond. "Great"? "Can't hold down that brown"? "I think that's my cousin"?

I understand why it's a big fucking deal that an Indian-American woman won Miss America for the first time. It's just as important as when Rima Faikh became the first Lebanese-American, and first Muslim, to win Miss USA in 2010. I find beauty pageants moronic (the title is a meaningless honor, 35 percent of which can be attributed to how good she looks in different articles of clothing and zero percent to her ability to grasp a basic concept of percentages), but I'm aware that these victories can shake up and change previous models of "All-American." I'm glad that we're moving toward a future where beauty queens of color are normal and not exceptional. It's just that every time an Indian achieves something big—a beauty pageant, a huge spelling bee, majority ownership in a major sports franchise—I feel like my excitement for my brown brethren is less actual excitement, and more just something I'm supposed to say.

Two nights ago, when Nina Davuluri became the first Indian American to be crowned Miss America, I got another flood of texts, and the cycle started all over again.

Facing a barrage of racist tweets that ranged from calling her an Arab and a terrorist to correlating her victory with a potential decline in gas prices, Davuluri hasn't had it easy. But is being lauded for her race by those decrying the racist tweeters any better? Those that have come to her defense have chosen to mainly focus on her race as well, not just as a reason to celebrate her victory, but as the reason. Maybe I'm just looking to pick a fight with my white-hating coworkers, but where I find the racist drivel on Twitter offensive, I also find the uplifting blog posts on race condescending. Writers have done a marvelous job defending Davuluri, but in doing so, they've focused the entire conversation on just one facet of her life: her race.

A lot of the problem lies with Davuluri herself—who, despite not being the only "diverse" contestant in the the group, ran and wowed the judges on the platform "Miss Diversity." While I don't blame her for picking an angle, the self-adopted title will never sit well with me. What makes her more diverse than any of the other many non-white contestants? And why is she willing to marginalize and tokenize herself as a justification for her win?

I grew up in a family that has always been proud of its Indian heritage. My parents emigrated from India to Indiana in the 70s (not because they just got confused, despite my insistence), and I was born and raised in California—specifically, in a model-minority suburb where my Indian background gave me no specific advantages over my many other other Asian and South Asian classmates.

It's not that I'm color blind. I'm aware that I've been given jobs in part because people look at my skin color and think: Hard working and smart. I know this because bosses have said it to me, more than once. (I'm not sure they know I graduated college with a 2.7 GPA and rarely had the discipline to attend lecture.) I've been out with many a guy who has crowed to me proudly of his love of Indian girls—but I've never continued to date someone who bragged about it. I don't want to be anyone's fetish. Or their quota.

I'm proud of Davuluri for breaking new ground, but not because she's a fellow Indian. I'm proud because that's how the U.S. grows. But I can't reconcile her willingness to put an asterisk on her own victory. Mindy Kaling was once asked by New York Magazine what it was like to be an Indian female show runner: “I never want to be called the funniest Indian female comedian that exists. I feel like I can go head-to-head with the best white, male comedy writers that are out there. Why would I want to self-categorize myself into a smaller group than I’m able to compete in?"

I understand that my views might not be reflective of my fellow Indians. I could have it wrong. Perhaps I'm just an ornery ex-pageant contestant myself, bitter that Davuluri succeeded where I couldn't. (In all fairness, my program didn't have a beauty component—it was a stage show for the uglies!) Maybe I should be happy that Indian kids here can feel less left out now that one of their kind has been accepted and lauded by one of the most conservative and traditionalist institution in the U.S. There's no shortage of role models for Indian-Americans in this country and around the world—both of the "looks good" and the "does good" variety. I'm happy to accept one more. But until we can accept these role models without a racial modifier preceding their accomplishments, please don't ask me to be proud.

Source: http://gawker.com/why-im-not-proud-an-indian-american-is-miss-america-1332249418

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« Reply #6 on: Sep 20, 2013 03:58 PM »

LOL at the closing statement via his mom!

And here is another funny segment on the issue from the Daily Show - "Back in Brown"

http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/thu-september-19-2013/back-in-brown-with-aasif-mandvi?utm=share_twitter

The Believers, men and women, are protectors one of another:  [9:71]
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