// Blind Spot
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« Reply #75 on: Aug 03, 2009 11:01 AM »

Shariah and Fiqh

Fiqh is the legal science and can sometimes be used synonymously with Shariah. The two are, however, different in that Shariah is closely identified with divine revelation (wahy), the knowledge of which could only be obtained from the Quran and Sunnah. Fiqh has, on the other hand, been largely developed by jurists and consists of rules which are mainly founded on human reasoning and ijtihad. Shariah is thus the wider circle, and it embraces in its orbit all human actions, whereas fiqh is narrower in scope and addresses mainly what is referred to as practical legal rules (al-ahkam al-amaliyah). The path of Shariah is laid down by God and His Messenger; the edifice of fiqh is erected by human endeavour.

Muslim scholars have generally regarded fiqh as understanding of the Shariah, and not the Shariah itself; a certain distinction between them had thus existed from the formative stages of fiqh. Note, for example, that the leading schools of law that were developed in the first three centuries were all known as the schools of fiqh. They were not known by any such terms as the Hanafi Shariah, or Shafii Shariah but consistently as Hanafi fiqh, Shafii fiqh and so forth. The underlying message was one of unity in reference to Shariah but of diversity with regard to fiqh.

Compiled From:
"Shariah Law - An Introduction" - Mohammad Hashim Kamali, pp. 15, 16
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31072167&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://www.oneworld-publications.com/cgi-bin/cart2/commerce.cgi?pid%3D344%26log_pid%3Dyes

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #76 on: Aug 10, 2009 10:12 AM »

Cool or Fool?

Our friends can either be the rope that ties us to our faith in Allah, or the knife that cuts any connection we had with our Creator. They are blessings, they are tests. Ask yourself, who are your friends? And more importantly, what kind of friend are you?

“You can do it!”

“I have faith in you!”; “C’mon don’t be a wimp”; "Here, try one”; “If you say no, people will think you’re weird”; “Don’t hang out with those boring, ‘religious’ guys!”

Whether you are in school, college, university, or working in the corporate world, these are the voices of many of the people you interact with. In our teenage culture, which exaggerates the idea of personal freedom and excessive entertainment, you are exposed to Peer Pressure.

You know You are a Victim of Peer Pressure when….

Most teenagers fall into flirting, clubbing, smoking, cursing, cheating, stealing, bullying, gambling, drinking, drugs, pornography and other immoral practices due to negative peer pressure. You know you are a victim of this pressure when you:

  • are curious to try something new because "everyone's doing it";
  • want to be liked, to fit in, to look cool;
  • worry that others will think you are weird or a coward if you resist;
  • say and do things in the group which you would not do on your own;
  • wish your parents should stay out of your ‘social life’;
  • do something without questioning the outcome.

Compiled From:
"Cool or Fool? Choosing the Right Friends" - Young Muslims Publications [Download and distribute]
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31076112&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://web.youngmuslims.ca/resources/brochures/93-coolfool.html
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31076112&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://web.youngmuslims.ca/brochures/CoolorFool.pdf
 

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #77 on: Aug 31, 2009 08:36 AM »

Living the Quran

Reading the Quran will be of little benefit to you, it may even bring misery and harm, unless you, from the first moment, begin to change and reconstruct your life in total surrender to God who has given you the Quran. Without the will and striving to act, neither the states of heart and enraptures of the soul, nor the ecstasies of mood, nor intellectual enrichment will be of any use to you. If the Quran does not have any impact upon your actions and if you do not obey what it enjoins and avoid what it prohibits, then you are not getting nearer to it.

Reading the Quran should induce faith inside your heart; that faith should shape your lives. It is not a gradual piecemeal process, by which you first spend years reading the Quran, then understanding it and strengthening your faith, and only then act upon it. All things take place simultaneously: as you hear or recite the words, they kindle faith inside you; as you have faith inside you, your life begins to change.

What we must remember is that to live by the Quran requires a major decision on our part: we have to completely alter the course of our life, irrespective of what may be the dominant thought-patterns around us, or what our society may be dictating, or what others may be doing. This decision requires major sacrifices. But unless we, as believers in the Quran being the word of God, are prepared to take the plunge, not much good will come out of the time spent with the Quran.

Compiled From:
"QURAN: Your Gateway To A New World" - Young Muslims Publication [Download and distribute]
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31088091&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://web.youngmuslims.ca/resources/brochures/52-brochures/76-quran.html
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31088091&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://web.youngmuslims.ca/brochures/quran.pdf

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #78 on: Sep 07, 2009 07:03 AM »

Remembrance

Remembrance gathers what has become dispersed, disperses what has become gathered, makes near what has grown remote and removes what has grown near.

It gathers together what has become dispersed within the servant: his heart, will and intention. For these to be separated, dispersed and dissipated is the worst of all torments, while in their union is happiness and life itself.

[Conversely], remembrance disperses that which has accumulated within the servant. Cares and woes, sadness and disappointment at not getting his share or at not getting what he seeks; greater and lesser sins and burdens all fall away, crumble and vanish.

Bringing nearer what is remote refers to the next world, which both the Devil and illusions render seemingly distant. For the servant who keeps to remembrance, it is as if he enters the next world and dwells there. When the next world is close to his heart, this one will grow distant; whenever that level is nearer to him, this one withdraws. And there is no way to this except through constancy in remembrance. And God is our helper.

Compiled From:
"The Invocation of God" - Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya, pp. 81, 82

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #79 on: Sep 20, 2009 11:21 AM »

Fraud

Fraud (ghish) is concealing from people some fault, blemish, or harm, either of a religious or worldly nature. Others have said that fraud is making something useless or defective seem useful and beneficial, or making something bad appear to be good. One of the most widely transmitted hadith in the Islamic tradition is the Prophet's saying, "Whoever defrauds us is not one of us." Sacred Law forbids selling something without pointing out its defects. If the seller conceals defects or fails to disclose them intentionally, this is fraud, whether its victim is a Muslims or not.

The Sophists of ancient Greece loved and practically worshipped rhetoric. They were the first historical relativists, in that they held the theory that right and wrong do not exist in an objective and transcending sense. Whoever makes the most skilled and persuasive argument is right. The Sophists believed that the most important thing is to be convincing, whether one is telling the truth or lying, whether one is defending corruption or upholding justice. This is fraud of the tongue.

Rhetoric was also an art form in Islamic literacy and oratorical history. But to the Muslim, rhetoric was the art of embellishing the truth and presenting it persuasively.

Compiled From:
"Purification of the Heart" - Hamza Yusuf, p. 100

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #80 on: Sep 28, 2009 12:38 PM »

Appreciate the Scenery

The most beautiful thing about beautiful scenery is that it usually inspires us. It has us connecting so many dots and feeling such harmony. If a husband has just had a big fight with his wife, a walk in the fresh air would likely have him come back home calmer, and more ready to find a solution. If a family wants to spend quality time together, have fun, and make memories that would last for generations, they might go on a camping trip together. A stressed employee might take lunch in the park because the natural surroundings might mean a tranquil break in the day. A student who takes a year off for traveling before beginning university can open up his/her horizons and have the experience help decide what he/she really wants for the future.

At times, people will look into life-coaching or help when they feel like something in their life needs to change. They may feel that they're just going around in circles and all the scenery looks the same, and it isn't of the inspiring variety. They know they need goals, they know they need a point B, they know they need a vision for their lives, but for some reason, they haven't been able to define it. They haven't discovered what would make them love their life and savour everyday simply because they're working towards the realization of that vision. And they're hoping that a coach will tell them what their vision should be.

Sorry to say it, but that's a futile hope. Vision comes from within you. You decide. Others may influence your thoughts about it, perhaps even help you mould it, but, at the end of the day, it is you who has to live it. And if you've decided that it is not a fun one, that it is a futile waste of your time and might cause complete and utter misery, then it's a dumb vision to hold on to because you'll never do anything about it. You'll need to: "Get a life! Get a vision!"

When you finally find your 'right' vision, your life will never be the same. You'll have such purpose and drive, that you may wake up in the mornings much earlier than usual and perhaps even without the aid of an alarm clock.

If you can dream it, if you can picture it, if you can visualize it, you're on your way to yours. There's something so liberating about finally connecting to that dream. I can't tell you what that feels like, but I pray that you find it soon. Or maybe you've already found it, but have buried it somewhere beneath responsibilities or life's tasks that consume your time. Or maybe you're frightened of failure, or maybe even success. But if you don't do this, not much else will seem important. You set a vision so that you can start appreciating the scenery. And the waves upon your feet.

Compiled From:
"Release Your Inner Queen of Sheba!" - Heba Alshareef, pp. 76 - 78
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31101889&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://hassayhouse.com/

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
Halima
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Reputation Power: 39
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Posts: 1714



« Reply #81 on: Oct 05, 2009 10:22 AM »

Seeking Reputation

Seeking reputations entails informing others of one's acts of obedience after they had been performed free of blemishes.

This results from some causes of showing off. A good deed becomes corrupted when telling others of it. But should you repent, [the deed's goodness] is restored.

Similar to this are deeds done so that others may hear about them. The one who does this is also considered a seeker of reputation, according to those with insight.

The great brigand [al-Shizaz] who robs all of these wayfarers is covetousness.

This is the cause of every iniquity, such as backbiting, lies, preoccupation of the heart during one's prayers, and insincere praise of others. Indeed, one will inevitably resort to hypocrisy as a result of it.

If one recognizes that [creatures] are incapable of benefitting anyone even themselves, then [covetousness] wanes.

Compiled From:
"Purification of the Heart" - Hamza Yusuf, p. 74

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
Halima
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« Reply #82 on: Oct 16, 2009 06:52 AM »

Comprehending Allah's Names

When we beseech Allah by His names, we should do so with dignity, composure, and understanding.

There are two ways that we call upon Allah. The first is to beseech him with our petitions, to entreat him with the concerns we have about our worldly lives and our hopes for the Hereafter. This is what we usually understand by supplication (dua).

The second way we call upon Allah is through our devotions. We do so by invoking His names in our remembrances, by meditating upon the meanings and significance of those names. We do so by praising Him and glorifying Him as His noble attributes warrant through devotion in our prayers, our remembrances, and in our God-consciousness.

Ibn al-Qayyim observes: "Allah is Knowing and He loves those who have knowledge. He is Beautiful and He loves beauty. He is Merciful, and He loves those who show mercy. He is Kind and He loves those who show kindness to others."

When we take to ourselves something of the light of Allah's beautiful names by learning what they mean and developing ourselves and our temperaments accordingly, then we have truly comprehended His names.

It is as Ibn al-Qayyim explains, that Allah is Oft-Pardoning and He loves to pardon. Therefore, He rewards and blesses those of us who pardon their fellow human beings. He is Generous and loves for us to be generous as well. He is the Concealer of Faults, and He loves it for us to conceal the faults of those who might have wronged us. He is Merciful, and He shows His mercy especially to those of us who are merciful to others.

One way that we call upon Allah's names through our devotions is by reading the Quran. This is because the Quran is full of the mention of His names. We also do so when we call up their meanings in our minds so that they become a constant part of our lives. In this way, we become more fully reliant upon Allah, more penitent, more mindful of our conduct, and stronger in faith. These are all ways in which we bring Allah's names to full realization in our lives.

Compiled From:
"Calling Upon Allah with Our Words & Deeds" - Salman al-Oadah
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31108402&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://islamtoday.com/showme_weekly_2006.cfm?cat_id%3D30%26sub_cat_id%3D2337

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
Halima
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Reputation Power: 39
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Posts: 1714



« Reply #83 on: Oct 29, 2009 01:08 PM »

Ostentation

The root source of ostentation (riya) is desire, wanting something from a source other than God. The cure for ostentation is actively and sincerely seeking out purification of the heart by removing four things:

     1. love of praise;
     2. fear of blame;
     3. desire for worldly benefit from people; and
     4. fear of harm from people.

This is accomplished by nurturing the certainty (yaqin) that only God can benefit or harm one. This is at the essence of the Islamic creed.

Helen Keller once said that there is no slave in this world that didn't have a king somewhere in his ancestry; and there is no king that didn't have a slave somewhere in his ancestry. This world has peaks and valleys. Nothing in creation is permanent. To spend time and energy seeking permanence in the fleeting things of the world - like praise - and then neglect what lasts forever with our Maker is the summit of human folly.

So recognizing that there is no harm or benefit except with God purifies the heart of vain pursuits and ostentation.

Compiled From:
"Purification of The Heart" - Hamza Yusuf, pp. 57-59
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31111736&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://www.fonsvitae.com/hamzayusuf.html

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
Halima
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Reputation Power: 39
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Posts: 1714



« Reply #84 on: Nov 05, 2009 09:14 AM »

Five Degrees of Prayer

With respect to prayer, there are five levels of people. [The lowest] is he 'who wrongs his own soul'; who is remiss; who curtails his ablution and the times, limits and essential elements of prayer.

At the second level is he who keeps the times, rules and elements of prayer; who keeps its ablution but is taken away by distractions, which he lacks the inner strength to resist.

At the third level is he who keeps the limits and essential elements of the prayer, and struggles against distractions. This person is preoccupied with striving against his Foe, 'lest he rob him of his prayer'. In prayer, he is in sacred combat [jihad].

At the fourth level is he who, standing in prayer, completes its requirements, its essential elements and its limits. His heart is absorbed in safeguarding the rules and requirements of the prayer 'lest he miss any of them'. In fact, his entire concern becomes performing the prayer as it should be, completely and perfectly. In this way, his concern for the prayer and for worshipping his Lord absorbs his heart.

At the fifth level is he who, standing in prayer, performs it in the manner of the fourth, but in addition places his heart before his Lord. With this he beholds God - ever vigilant before Him, filled with His love and glory - as if, seeing Him, he were physically present before Him. Therefore, the distractions vanish, as the veil between him and his Lord is lifted. The difference between this person in his prayer and everyone else is as vast as the distance between heaven and earth, for he is occupied [only] with his Lord Almighty in prayer, in which he finds his source of gladness.

[Of these five persons], the first will be punished, the second admonished, the third redeemed, the fourth rewarded and the fifth brought near to his Lord - for his source of gladness has been placed in prayer. And whoever is gladdened by the prayer in this world will be gladdened by nearness to his Lord in this world and the next. He who finds gladness in God, gladdens others [in turn]. But whoever does not, leaves this world a loser.

Compiled From:
"The Invocation of God" - Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya, pp. 29, 30

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
Halima
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Posts: 1714



« Reply #85 on: Nov 09, 2009 08:17 AM »

Hajj Spirit

For those of us not going to Hajj this year, it's easy to dismiss the journey of a lifetime. But we non-Hajjis can swing into the Hajj spirit too, and we should. We must always remember that one day, when our health and finances are in the right shape, we too must make this journey to the House of God.

Here are a couple of ideas:

Help a Hajji

There's so much to do and so little time before leaving for Hajj. Any help you can offer a family member or friend about to make Hajj will be welcome. You can offer to make phone calls to various travel groups, cook or baby-sit so the pilgrim-to-be can pack, run errands for them or come up with a list of items they need to take with them. Ask them how you can be of most help.

Read/watch/learn about Hajj

When it comes to prayer and fasting, we tend to know much more about these pillars of the faith than Hajj. Most of us tend to put off finding more until we actually go. But who knows how long you have before going, so why wait? If books aren't your thing, find a video, an audio CD, a CD-rom or a DVD that can give you the basics.

You can and should also read travel accounts and diaries of those who have gone for Hajj. Their insights provide a more personal perspective of the journey.

Throw a party!

What better way to get into the spirit than to hold a party in honor of the person going for Hajj? This is also a great way to get kids interested in the topic of Hajj. It will also provide some much-needed relief from the stress before going to the pilgrim-to-be.

You can also hold a bash after your friend/family member returns as an official "Hajji."

Ask them to remember you in their Duas

Knowing that someone's praying for you at the House of God will no doubt help you remember Hajj. But don't just say the standard, "remember me in your Duas." Try to ask for at least one specific thing they can ask for on your behalf. Whether it's a job, a child, passing a difficult class or a better relationship with your spouse, remember that only God can grant us what we need and want. And what better place to ask than the House of God?

Read the Prophet's Last Sermon

The Prophet Muhammad's  http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31117741&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://www.soundvision.com/info/hajj/lastsermon.asp last sermon was offered on the occasion of the only Hajj he ever performed in his lifetime. Peace and blessings be upon him. Read the sermon not only for the wisdom it offers, but also, try to close your eyes and picture yourself there, with the thousands of other Muslims who were.

It will be hard not to cry.

Compiled From:
"Getting into the Hajj spirit" - SoundVision.com
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31117741&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://soundvision.com/info/hajj/gettingintohajjspirit.asp

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
Halima
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Reputation Power: 39
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Posts: 1714



« Reply #86 on: Nov 12, 2009 06:51 AM »

Rancour

Ghill is a malady of the heart that is closely related to rancour, extreme anger, and malice. It comes from the same Arabic root from which the word aghlal originates, which is used in the Quran to mean yokes around the neck (Quran 36:Cool, as if to say that rancour dwells in a heart bound to rancour and treachery. Rancour is pungent emotion that is rooted in being extremely angry at a person to the point that one wishes harm to come to him. But the ultimate victim of rancour is its carrier.

Imam Mawlud says that if a person feels rancour toward a particular person, he should show that person goodwill. By nature, people are naturally inclined to love those who do good to them. And if one shows a person good, feelings of rancour will fall to the wayside.

If a person has rancour toward another believer, God shall not forgive that person until he forgives his brother, for rancour is a serious affliction that festers in one's heart and blocks good things from coming to one.

Compiled From:
"Purification of The Heart" - Hamza Yusuf, pp.122, 123
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31120902&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://www.fonsvitae.com/hamzayusuf.html

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
Halima
Sis
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*

Reputation Power: 39
Halima is working their way up :)Halima is working their way up :)Halima is working their way up :)
Gender: Female
Posts: 1714



« Reply #87 on: Nov 13, 2009 09:26 AM »

General Supplication

What one wants for oneself, one must also desire for others. Islam induces man to share the good things of life with his fellowmen as his brothers. Islam teaches us that the more general a supplication is, the more likelihood there is of its acceptance. There are many sayings of the Prophet, peace be upon him, that corroborate this.

When a Muslim supplicates for others and wishes for them what he wishes for himself, and continues to do so over a long period, he benefits personally. It brings him nearer to Allah as well to his fellowmen. And he gradually attains to a state where his likes and dislikes merge and become one with the pleasure and displeasure of Allah. In addition, he is saved from moral diseases, like malice, envy, spite, and hatred of others. Good and healthy feelings eventually become the hall-mark of his social behaviour, so he is eager to help others and overlook their faults and is ready to forgive them.

Compiled From:
"Freedom and Responsibility in Quranic Perspective" - Hasan Al-Anani, pp. 200, 201

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #88 on: Dec 15, 2009 06:10 AM »

Shrivelled Culture

There are two ways by which the spirit of a culture may be shrivelled. In the first - the Orwellian - culture becomes a prison. In the second - the Huxleyan - culture becomes a burlesque.

No one needs to be reminded that our world is now marred by many prison-cultures whose structure Orwell described accurately in his parables. Of course, Orwell was not the first to teach us about the spiritual devastations of tyranny. What is irreplaceable about his work is his insistence that it makes little difference if our wardens are inspired by right- or left-wing ideologies. The gates of the prison are equally impenetrable, surveillance equally rigorous, icon-worship equally pervasive.

What Huxley teaches is that in the age of advanced technology, spiritual devastation is more likely to come from an enemy with a smiling face than from one whose countenance exudes suspicion and hate. In the Huxleyan prophecy, Big Brother does not watch us, by his choice. We watch him, by ours. There is no need for wardens or gates or Ministries of Truth. When a population becomes distracted by trivia, when cultural life is redefined as a perpetual round of entertainments, when serious public conversation becomes a form of baby-talk, when, in short, a people become an audience and their public business a vaudeville act, then a nation finds itself at risk; culture-death is a clear possibility.

An Orwellian world is much easier to recognize, and to oppose, than a Huxleyan. Everything in our background has prepared us to know and resist a prison when the gates begin to close around us. But what if there are no cries of anguish to be heard? Who is prepared to take arms against a sea of amusements? To whom do we complain, and when, and in what tone of voice, when serious discourse dissolves into giggle? What is the antidote to a culture's being drained by laughter?

Huxley believed that we are in a race between education and disaster, and he wrote continuously about the necessity of our understanding the politics and epistemology of media. For in the end, he was trying to tell us that what afflicted the people in Brave New World was not that they were laughing instead of thinking, but that they did not know what they were laughing about and why they had stopped thinking.

Compiled From:
"Amusing Ourselves to Death" - Neil Postman, pp. 155-163
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31126032&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://www.penguin.ca/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9780143036531,00.html?AMUSING_OURSELVES_TO_DEATH_Neil_Postman
 

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #89 on: Dec 17, 2009 01:12 PM »

Islam: It's Shahadah at Work

“We are perhaps living in times when living for Islam is more difficult than dying for it.” [Abdul Malik Mujahid]

Why must Islam be so emphatically linked with the idea of struggle? Cannot a person be a good Muslim without involving himself or herself in a struggle requiring sacrifices? The answer is: No. And for very obvious reasons. Islam is not merely the confession of a faith which is made once in a lifetime. It requires a radical reorientation of life and thought. The confession is not merely verbal; it is an act of witnessing (Shahadah) which must transform our life into a living testimony of faith. You enter Islam by saying Shahadah (bearing witness). But you can live in Islam only by constantly doing Shahadah (Quran 2:143, 22:28). This will bring you in ceaseless confrontation with false gods inside you and outside you. Every act of sacrifice nourishes your Iman; for it transforms a verbal confession into a living reality. Therefore, it is through sacrifice that you can truly learn to love Allah, and to live and die for Him!

Compiled From:
"Sacrifice - The Making of a Muslim" - Young Muslims Publication
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31129790&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://web.youngmuslims.ca/resources/brochures/99-sacrifice.html
 

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #90 on: Dec 22, 2009 06:43 AM »

Tawhid - Benefits for Humanity

Allah, by declaring and repeatedly stressing His Own Oneness and Uniqueness in the Quran, confers a three-fold benefit on humanity:

1. Peace with Allah

Allah bestows upon human beings freedom and spiritual dignity by providing the conviction that all creation, including human life, is not the outcome of a play of blind forces, but rather has a definite meaning and a definite purpose. Thus, man attains peace with his own destiny and with Allah.

2. Peace with himself

Man is informed through the Oneness of Allah that there is no inherent contradiction between the physical and the spiritual aspects of his own life. Thus, he may achieve peace within himself.

3. Peace with his social environment and his fellow men

One person is superior to another, not by birth or social function, but by virtue alone. Efforts to achieve social justice should take guidance and inspiration from the absolute transcendental justice inherent in the unique wisdom of Allah. Hence our social life, as well as our individual life, must be subordinated to the principle of moderation and equity, a just balance between what is due and necessary to oneself and what is due to others.

Compiled From:
"Words That Moved the World" - Qazi Ashfaq Ahmad, pp. 58-59
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31132598&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://sitecreator.siteberry.com/Appdata/build/paltop.asp?GoForFeature%3DStore%26GoForAction%3DDETAIL%26Product_Id%3D1219%26W_ID%3D1%26P_ID%3D3

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
Halima
Sis
Hero Member
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Reputation Power: 39
Halima is working their way up :)Halima is working their way up :)Halima is working their way up :)
Gender: Female
Posts: 1714



« Reply #91 on: Dec 24, 2009 06:12 AM »

Lesson of The Tragedy

Islam has a history of beautiful domestic affections, of sufferings and of spiritual endeavour, second to none in the world. That side of Muslim history, although to me the most precious, is, I am sorry to say, often neglected. It is most important that we should call attention to it, reiterated attention, the attention of our own people as well as the attention of those who are interested in historical and religious truth. If there is anything precious in Islamic history it is not the wars, or the politics, or the brilliant expansion, or the glorious conquests, or even the intellectual spoils which our ancestors gathered. In these matters, our history, like all history, has its lights and shades. What we need especially to emphasise is the spirit of organisation, of brotherhood, of undaunted courage in moral and spiritual life.

There is of course the physical suffering in martyrdom, and all sorrow and suffering claim our sympathy, — the dearest, purest, most outflowing sympathy that we can give. But there is a greater suffering than physical suffering. That is when a valiant soul seems to stand against the world; when the noblest motives are reviled and mocked; when truth seems to suffer an eclipse. It may even seem that the martyr has but to say a word of compliance, do a little deed of non-resistance; and much sorrow and suffering would be saved; and the insidious whisper comes: “Truth after all can never die.” That is perfectly true. Abstract truth can never die. It is independent of man’s cognition. But the whole battle is for man’s keeping hold of truth and righteousness. And that can only be done by the highest examples of man’s conduct – spiritual striving and suffering enduring firmness of faith and purpose, patience and courage where ordinary mortals would give in or be cowed down, the sacrifice of ordinary motives to supreme truth in scorn of consequence. The martyr bears witness, and the witness redeems what would otherwise be called failure. It so happened with Husain. For all were touched by the story of his martyrdom, and it gave the deathblow to the politics of Damascus and all it stood for. And Muharram has still the power to unite the different schools of thought in Islam, and make a powerful appeal to non-Muslims also.

That, to my mind, is the supreme significance of martyrdom. All human history shows that the human spirit strives in many directions, deriving strength and sustenance from many sources. Our bodies, our physical powers, have developed or evolved from earlier forms, after many struggles and defeats. Our intellect has had its martyrs, and our great explorers have often gone forth with the martyrs’ spirit. All honour to them. But the highest honour must still lie with the great explorers of spiritual territory, those who faced fearful odds and refused to surrender to evil. Rather than allow a stigma to attach to sacred things, they paid with their own lives the penalty of resistance. The first kind of resistance offered by the Imam was when he went from city to city, hunted about from place to place, but making no compromise with evil. Then was offered the choice of an effectual but dangerous attempt at clearing the house of God, or living at ease for himself by tacit abandonment of his striving friends. He chose the path of danger with duty and honour, and never swerved from it giving up his life freely and bravely. His story purifies our emotions. We can best honour his memory by allowing it to teach us courage and constancy.

Compiled From:
"Imam Husain And His Martyrdom" - Abdullah Yusuf Ali
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=1049602440&msgid=31135589&act=216G&c=68038&admin=0&destination=http://articles.youngmuslims.ca/movement-and-activism/imam-husain-and-his-martyrdom/

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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« Reply #92 on: Dec 27, 2009 11:38 AM »

Dar al-Islam

According to Abu Hanifah, a country or a territory becomes a Dar al-Islam if it satisfies two conditions: (a) the Muslims must be able to enjoy peace and security; and (b) it must have common frontiers with some Muslim countries (other places of Dar al-Islam). This view, which makes no reference to the supreme rule of Islamic law, allows greater freedom of movement to, and residence in, places around the world, so long as these are not too far from the heart of the Islamic world. Probably the second condition is intended to offer the possibility of a safe retreat in the eventuality that Muslims are, unexpectedly, subjected to hardship or persecution. According to this view, Muslims can take residence in such proximate lands, so long as they can earn their living in peace and practise their religious duties without affront to their dignity.

A contemporary version of Abu Hanifah's view can be envisaged by extending the concept of proximity, which is for him, quite understandably, exclusively territorial. Given the revolution in communications, proximity becomes increasingly relative. 'Accessibility' may be a more relevant term for modern times. The more open a society is in allowing free movement of its residents across its national frontiers, the more 'accessible' it is.

Abu Hanifah's view has important consequences for the position of Muslim minorities the world over. His definition of Dar al-Islam would encourage them - so long as, of course, their security is not endangered - to adopt a more constructive and vigorous attitude to residing in countries whose dominant culture is non-Islamic. Islam is, after all, a universalist religion, recognising no boundaries of race or language. The earth as a whole belongs to God, and Muslims have an important message to convey to mankind - it is their privilege to be trustees of this universal mission. Abu Hanifah's view, permitting greater movement, encourages at one and the same time a spirit of wonder and exploration and desire to communicate the ideals of Islam.

Compiled From:
"Hijrah: Story and Significance" - Zakaria Bashier, pp. 93, 94

The Almighty Allah says,

"When a servant thinks of Me, I am near.
When he invokes Me, I am with him.
If he reflects on Me in secret, I reply in secret,
And if he acknowledges Me in an assembly,
I acknowledge him in a far superior assembly."

- Prophet Muhammad (SAW), as reptd by Abu Huraira
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