Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Chinese women scholars  (Read 3868 times)
jannah
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Reputation Power: 277
jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!jannah is awe-inspiring mA!
Posts: 7133


I heart the Madina


WWW
« on: Jul 14, 2008 07:45 AM »


How wonderful ma'shallah

==================

    YINCHUAN, June 23 (Xinhua) — At a tiny courtyard mosque in China’s most populous Muslim region, Jin Meihua leads other women in prayer and chants.

    Every day, the 44-year-old dons a black robe and violet scarf and preaches to dozens of women at the Little White Mosque in northwest China’s Ningxia Hui Autonomous region, where most of the country’s Islam-faith Hui ethnic minority live.

    Jin has a routine life. “Except attending funerals, I always stay in the mosque, teaching the female Muslims Islamic scriptures.”

    She is a female imam or “ahong,” pronounced ah-hung, from the Persian word “akhund” for “the learned.” In China, a female imam is an innovation, despite being rare in Arabic countries.

    Jin has 15 students, mostly middle-aged and elderly people. They learn slowly and need two years to grasp “The Holy Qu’ran.”

    “Many female Muslims do not have the benefit of a school education. Although they are Muslims, they know nothing about the Qu’ran. I want to teach them the holy scriptures and hope they can be inspired and think independently,” she said.

    “Women ahong are the best qualified to do this because they can communicate with the female faithful in ways the male ahongs can’t.”

    As early as the late Ming dynasty (around the 17th century), the faithful had set up female Muslim schools around the country. These turned into female mosques operated by women imams in late Qing dynasty (around the 19th century).

    The practice of female imams then spread to all the Chinese Muslim societies, said Shui Jingjun, a Henan Provincial Academy of Social Sciences researcher.

    In the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), religion was banned. It was revived in the 1980s, increasing the numbers of Buddhists, Taoists, Muslims and Christians, among others. The government’s push for gender equality helped broaden Muslim women’s roles.

    However, China’s women imams are not equal with the male prayer leaders. They do not lead salat — the five daily prayers considered among the most important Muslim obligations. The prayers are instead piped via loudspeakers into the female mosques from the nearby male ones.

    Still, the female imams guide others in worship and are the primary spiritual leaders for the women in their communities. In the female mosque, the female Muslims can learn the Qu’ran and the Islamic doctrines, as well as the Arabic language.

    “The appearance of female mosque and female imams has met the female Muslims’ demand for religious knowledge and promoted harmony in the Muslim society,” said Hei Fuli, vice chairman of the Islamic Association of Ningxia. “The Arabic teachings have also enriched their lives.”

    Currently, Ningxia has more than 80 female imams. There are more than 3,600 registered mosques and 6,000 ahongs in the region, he said.

    Unlike most of her classmates who went to the coastal areas as translators, Zhao Dongmei, 21, a graduate from the Tongxin County Arab Language School in 2005, chose to be a female imam in Yuanzhou District, Guyuan City. Here, nearly half of the population is Muslim.

    The timid girl with a mauve scarf and a pair of glasses, received her imam certificate issued by the local Islamic association before graduation. She became a female imam in the female mosque a month after marriage.

    “I teach 10 young girls Arabic and Islamic scriptures. They all come from the countryside,” Zhao said, adding, “They can further their studies, be translators or spread what they have learned in their villages.”
se7en
Sis
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 11
se7en has no influence :(
Posts: 358



« Reply #1 on: Jul 14, 2008 02:56 PM »


as salaamu alaykum,

Masha'Allah, awesome Smiley

I find it interesting that they refer to them specifically as 'imams'... I wonder what makes them different from an 'aalima' in India/Pakistan or a woman 'teacher/speaker/daaiya' in the West? 
Ehsan
Bro
Jr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 0
Ehsan has no influence :(
Posts: 60



WWW
« Reply #2 on: Jul 14, 2008 11:10 PM »

Mashallah that is beautiful, indeed i hope this is an encouragement to other sisters to be important figureheads in islam. Without our sisters, the deen is only at 50% strength.


INFORMING YOU ABOUT ISLAM

Abdurahman
Bro
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 4
Abdurahman has no influence :(
Posts: 390


Oh Allah, Guide us to the Straight Path.


« Reply #3 on: Jul 15, 2008 12:58 PM »

Asalamualaikum wrt wb,


I know several Muslims from China, may Allah ease their struggles for equality with non-Muslims.

It is an incorrect usage of language to say female imam, since it is not allowed for women to be imams in Islam.  Rather they are scholars, or 'aalimah.  Even according to those scholars who allow women to pray together in certain conditions, all the women must be in one line together, and no one is allowed to be 'imam' ie. in front.  The writer was correct in saying 'a female imam is an innovation', since it is not allowed in Islam.

The greatest woman scholar of all time, Aisha may Allah be pleased with her,  would pray behind her freed slave Dhakwan who read from the mushaf since he was not that knowledgable of the Quran.

Finally, it is not correct to say female mosque.  Mosques should be for men and women, as Allah says "Indeed masjids are for Allah (alone)."  Women cannot hold their own prayers in their own masajid as the Prophet (may Allah's peace and blessings be upon him) never allowed that.  If what is meant here is a madrassa for girls, then the Hanafi school which is the dominant madhab in China does not allow women to pray together, rather they should each make their prayers separately.

However, it is nice to hear that the sisters are learning the deen and becoming Aalimahs, as long as what they are learning is according to sound knowledge.  Perhaps the author of this article was not Muslim, as my understanding is the Chinese are strongly Hanafi and rarely contradict the sayings of their madhab.

If we follow the Sunnah, we will be rightly guided and attain success in both worlds.  May Allah guide us to follow the deen correctly.


And Allah knows best.



Be merciful to those on earth, and the One in the Heavens will be merciful to you.
Ehsan
Bro
Jr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 0
Ehsan has no influence :(
Posts: 60



WWW
« Reply #4 on: Jul 16, 2008 01:10 PM »

Assalamualaikum,

Brother just a question regarding this topic, isn't the imam simply the one who leads from the beginning of the salah to the end of the salah? Therefore isnt the female who is leading the salah for the women - the "imam" during this time?


INFORMING YOU ABOUT ISLAM

Abdurahman
Bro
Sr. Member
*

Reputation Power: 4
Abdurahman has no influence :(
Posts: 390


Oh Allah, Guide us to the Straight Path.


« Reply #5 on: Jul 19, 2008 11:48 PM »

Walaikum salam wrt dear brother Ehsan,


All praise be to Allah.


The Ulema unanimously agree that it is better for a woman to pray in her home rather than praying in the Masjid.  There are many wisdoms to this, but it would take time to get into it, so let us suffice to say it is the recommendation of the Messenger of Allah, may Allah's peace and blessings be upon him.

Thus, creating masjids specifically for women is contrary to the Prophetic Sunnah.

However it is from the Sunnah for Masajid to have areas for women, especially in shopping areas and other places where women happen to be in need to perform Salat.

But as for building Masjids specifically for women, than appointing a female Imam, and her holding the five daily salats there, this is something contrary to the Sunnah and is an innovation in the religion.  What would she do if she was leading prayer and she had her monthly cycle?  Nifaas?  What if her husband or her children need her?

The scholars who allow women to pray together allow it in the homes, and no adhan is called for this prayer.


As for your saying that a woman who leads prayer is like an Imam, so to speak, perhaps that could be correct is some sense, but then reflect on the wisdom of having the woman who is leading the prayer, pray in the same line as the other women.  Why do you think she is not allowed to stand in front of the other women? 

At the same time, Islam very much encourages the Muslim sisters to become scholars and Aalimahs and Faqhihas and Huffadh who memorize the Prophetic Hadith.  May Allah guide our sisters to excel in these areas.  I hope none of the sisters get upset when reading this.  I remember one sister saying in our community: "It doesn't matter if the sisters pray behind and the brothers in front, what matters is that we truly put Allah in front of us when we begin our prayers."

All success lies in following the Messenger, may Allah's peace and blessings be upon him.



And Allah knows best.

Be merciful to those on earth, and the One in the Heavens will be merciful to you.
nuh
Guest
« Reply #6 on: Jul 25, 2008 09:20 PM »

As salaam alaikum.

I watched a special last night entitled "Islam in China" -- it is part of a week long series that examines the role of religion in the PRC.

It turns out the communist government has created the role of 'government authorized female Imam' in mosques to teach PRC political doctrine on birth control and abortion. The 'female Imam' hands out booklet's that endorse these haraam activities in addition to teaching how to recite the Quran, offer salat etc.

Ma'as salaama,
nuh
 bro
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: